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Title: The Blue Book of Chess
       Teaching the Rudiments of the Game, and Giving an Analysis
              of All the Recognized Openings

Author: Howard Staunton and "Modern Authorities"

Release Date: July 28, 2005 [EBook #16377]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ASCII

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TRANSCRIBER'S NOTE:

For the benefit of the reader, the eighty-five "Illustrative Games" in this book have been translated into Portable Game Notation. A hyperlink has also been provided, linking each of these games to its PGN format.






THE BLUE BOOK OF

CHESS

TEACHING THE RUDIMENTS OF THE
GAME, AND GIVING AN ANALYSIS OF
ALL THE RECOGNIZED OPENINGS

——ILLUSTRATED BY——

APPROPRIATE GAMES ACTUALLY PLAYED
BY MORPHY, HARRWITZ, ANDERSSEN, STAUNTON,
EVANS, MONTGOMERY, MEEK AND OTHERS


——INCLUDING——

LASKER, STEINITZ, SCHLECHTER, PILLSBURY,
AND OTHER RECENT PLAYERS

REVISED EDITION
Based on the work of Staunton and Modern Authorities

THE JOHN C. WINSTON COMPANY
PHILADELPHIA, U.S.A.







Copyright, 1910, by
THE JOHN C. WINSTON Co.

Copyright, 1870, by
PORTER & COATES



Chessboard

CHESS BOARD
Showing the men properly set up to commence play.


[3]

PREFACE TO NEW REVISED EDITION.

The following work is designed for those who are learning the noble game of Chess.

Many persons have been confused and discouraged at the very outset of the study by the great variety and the delicate distinctions of the openings: and this has constituted a fault in many otherwise excellent manuals for the learner.

The chief aim of the Editor of these pages has been to avoid this fault, by simplifying the openings, and by giving to the student chiefly such moves as are recognized to be the best, both in attack and defence. By playing over carefully the illustrative games, the learner will also see, at each opening, the variations made by experienced players in accordance with circumstances. As great a variety of actually played games has been given as was possible in a work of such limited scope. To this end the games of the distinguished players of different nations have been introduced, classified according to the different openings; and thus the reader will find the combined genius and skill of the old heroes like Philidor, Morphy, Staunton, Anderssen, Harrwitz, Evans, Montgomery and Cochrane, together with such recent masters as Lasker, Steinitz, Schlechter, Pillsbury, Marshall, Tarrasch, Janowsky, Tchigorin, and many other players of world-wide celebrity. The basis of this work is Staunton's "Chess Player's Handbook;" but other standard books have been drawn upon to fit it to be a manual for the beginner of to-day.

In order to insure perfect accuracy, all the lessons and games have been carefully gone over on the board after being put in type.

[4]

NAMES OF PLAYERS.

ANDERSSEN, 91, 93, 98, 165, 206, 207, 212, 214. MARACHE, 94, 110.
BIERWIRTH, 200. MARSHALL, 190.
BLEDOW, 132, 140. MEAD, 92.
BOUCHER, 57. MEEK, 110.
BUCKLE, 86. MONTGOMERY, 80, 184, 201, 206, 208, 209.
CAPDEBO, 79. MORPHY, 57, 58, 59, 60, 65, 91, 94, 98, 200, 203, 206, 207, 210, 211, 212, 214.
CHENEY, 85. NEW YORK, 108, 109, 202.
CLEMENTS, 204. PERIGAL, 178.
COCHRANE, 72, 111, 125, 166. PETROFF, 66, 73.
DANIELS, 126. PHILADELPHIA, 108, 109, 202.
DER LAZA, 96, 140, 141, 159. PHILIDOR, 60.
DESCHAPELLES, 111. PILLSBURY, 67, 188.
DESLOGES, 180. PINDAR, 201.
EVANS, 114, 135, 136, 166. POPERT, 85, 122, 141.
GHULAM CASSIM, 161. POTIER, 65.
HARRWITZ, 58, 59, 79, 86, 113, 210, 211. PRETI, 203.
HENDERSON, 114. ROUSSEAU, 131.
HILLEL, 93. SCHLECHTER, 188.
HORWITZ, 80, 83, 114, 132. SCHULTEN, 132.
JAENISCH, 73. ST. AMANT, 84, 136, 137.
JANOWSKY, 190. STANLEY, 131.
JONES, Dr., 208, 209. STAUNTON, 72, 80, 83, 84, 113, 122, 125, 162, 179.
KIESERITZKY, 180. STEINITZ, 99, 213.
KIPPING, 165. SZEN, 159.
LA BOURDONNAIS, 124, 161, 177, 178. TARRASCH, 199.
LASKER, 99, 199. TCHIGORIN, 67.
LEWIS, Dr., 204. THOMPSON, 206.
LEWIS, Mr., 158. VON BILGUER, 132.
McADAM, 184. WALKER, 126, 137.
McCABE, 80. ZUKERTORT, 213.
McDONNELL, 124, 161, 177, 178.
[5]

CONTENTS.

Chapter I.  IntroductionPage 7
The Chess-Board and Men—Moves and Powers of the Pieces and Pawns—Notation Used to Describe their Movements—Technical Terms of Chess—Illustrations of Technical Terms—Relative Value of the Chess Forces—The Chess Code, or, Laws of the Game—General Rules and Observations—Maxims and Advice for an Inexperienced Player—Preliminary Game.
 
II.  King's Knight's Opening51-115
Damiano Gambit, 52; Philidor's Defence, 54; Petroff's Defence, 61; Counter Gambit in the Knight's Opening, 68; The Giuoco Piano, 74; Captain Evans's Gambit, 88; The Two Knights' Defence, 95; The Knight's Game of Ruy Lopez, 97; The Queen's Pawn Game, or Scotch Gambit, 101; The Queen's Bishop's Pawn Game in the King's Knight's Opening, 116.
 
III.  The King's Bishop's Opening116-137
The Two Kings' Bishops' Game, 116; McDonnell's Double Gambit, 120; The Lopez Gambit, 121; The King's Knight's Defence in King's Bishop's Opening, 127; Counter Gambit in the King's Bishop's Opening, 128; The Queen's Bishop's Pawn's Defence in the King's Bishop's Opening, 130; Queen's Bishop's Pawn's Opening, 134.
 
IV.  The King's Gambit138-184
The King's Gambit proper, or King's Knight's Gambit, 138; The Cunningham Gambit, 142; The Salvio Gambit, 144; The Cochrane Gambit, 146; The Muzio Gambit 152; The Allgaier Gambit, 162; The King's Rook's Pawn Gambit, 164; The King's Bishop's Gambit, 166; The Gambit Declined, 180.
 
V.  The Queen's Gambit185-191
The Gambit refused, 188.
 
VI.  Irregular Openings192-214
The French Game, 192; The Sicilian Game, 193; The Wing Gambit, 194; The Centre Counter Gambit, 195; The Fianchetto, 196, Steinitz Gambit, 213.
 
VII.  Endings of Games215
Chess Problems248
[7]

THE CHESS HANDBOOK.

CHAPTER I.

INTRODUCTION.

DESCRIPTION OF THE CHESS-BOARD AND MEN—ARRANGEMENT OF THE MEN—THE KING—THE QUEEN—THE ROOKS OR CASTLES—THE BISHOPS—THE KNIGHTS—AND THE PAWNS—THEIR MOVEMENTS, POWERS, METHOD OF CAPTURING AN ADVERSE MAN, ETC.



DESCRIPTION OF THE CHESS-BOARD AND MEN.

The game of Chess is played by two persons, each having at command a little army of sixteen men, upon a board divided into sixty-four squares. The squares are usually colored white and black, or red and white, alternately; and custom has made it an indispensable regulation, that the board shall be so placed that each player has a white square at his right-hand corner.

The following diagram represents the board with all the men arranged in proper order for the commencement of a game:—

[8]

No. 1.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.

Each player, it will be observed, has eight superior Pieces or officers, and eight minor ones which are called Pawns; and, for the purpose of distinction, the Pieces and Pawns of one party are of a different color from those of the other.

A King Chessboard Chessboard
A Queen Chessboard Chessboard
Two Rooks, or Castles
(as they are indiscriminately called)
Chessboard Chessboard
Two Bishops Chessboard Chessboard
Two Knights Chessboard Chessboard
And each of these Pieces has his Pawn or Foot-soldier Chessboard Chessboard
making in all an array of sixteen men on each side.
[9]

On beginning a game, these Pieces and Pawns are disposed in the manner shown on the foregoing diagram. The King and Queen occupy the centre squares of the first or "royal" line, as it is called, and each has for its supporters a Bishop, a Knight, and a Rook, while before the whole stand the Pawns or Foot-soldiers in a row. (To prevent a common error among young players, of misplacing the King and Queen on commencing a game, it is well to bear in mind that at the outset each Queen stands on her own color.) The Pieces on the King's side of the board are called the King's, as King's Bishop, King's Knight, King's Rook; and the Pawns directly in front of them, the King's Pawn, King's Bishop's Pawn, King's Knight's Pawn, and King's Rook's Pawn. The Pieces on the Queen's side are, in like manner, called the Queen's Bishop, Queen's Knight, and Queen's Rook; and the Pawns before them, Queen's Bishop's Pawn, Queen's Knight's Pawn, and Queen's Rook's Pawn.

MOVEMENT OF THE PIECES AND PAWNS,
AND MODE OF CAPTURING AN ADVERSE MAN.

A knowledge of the moves peculiar to these several men is so difficult to describe in writing, and so comparatively easy to acquire over the chess-board, from any competent person, that the learner is strongly recommended to avail himself of the latter means when practicable: for the use, however, of those who have no chess-playing acquaintance at command, the subjoined description will, it is hoped, suffice.

The "Pieces," by which title the eight superior officers are technically designated, in contradistinction to the "Pawns," all take in the same direction in which they move. This act consists in removing the adverse Piece or Pawn from the board, and placing the captor on the square the former occupied. To make this clear, we will [10]begin with the King, and show his mode of moving and of capturing an adverse man.

Chessboard The King. Chessboard

The King can move one square only at a time (except in "Castling," which will be explained hereafter), but he can make this move in any direction, forwards, backwards, laterally, or diagonally. He can take any one of the adversary's men which stands on an adjoining square to that he occupies, provided such man is left unprotected, and he has the peculiar privilege of being himself exempt from capture. He is not permitted, however, to move into check, that is, on to any square which is guarded by a Piece or Pawn of the enemy, nor can he, under any circumstance, be played to an adjacent square to that on which the rival King is stationed. Like most of the other Pieces, his power is greatest in the middle of the board, where, without obstruction, he has the choice of eight different squares. At the sides, he may play to any one of five, but when in the angles of the board, three squares only are at his command.

No. 2.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.

[11]

Supposing diagram No. 2 to show the position of the men towards the conclusion of a game, and it being either party's turn to play, he could take the adverse Pawn from the board, and place his King on the square it occupied; and, by doing so, the King would not depart from the order of his march, which, as we have before said, permits him to move one step in every direction. In each of these instances we have placed the Pawn in front of the King, but he would be equally entitled to take it were it standing on any other part of the eight squares immediately surrounding him, always provided it was not sustained or guarded by some other Piece or Pawn.

Chessboard The Queen. Chessboard

The Queen is by much the most powerful of the forces. [12]She has the advantage of moving as a Rook, in straight lines, forwards, backwards, and sideways, to the extent of the board in all directions, and as a Bishop, diagonally, with the same range. To comprehend her scope of action, place her alone in the centre of the board; it will then be seen that she has the command of no less than twenty-seven squares, besides the one she stands on. (Diagram No. 3.)

No. 3.

Chessboard

Thus placed in the middle of the board, the range of the Queen is immense. She has here the option of taking any one of eight men at the extremity of the board, on the squares respectively numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8, should her line of march be unobstructed; and if these men were nearer, on any of the intermediate squares, she would be equally enabled to take any one of them at her choice. Like all the other Pieces and Pawns, she effects the capture by removing the man from the board and stationing herself on the vacated square.

Chessboard The Rook. Chessboard

No. 4.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.

[13]The Rook, or Castle, is next in power to the Queen. He moves in a straight line, forwards, backwards, or sideways, having a uniform range, on a clear board, of fourteen squares, exclusive of the one he occupies.

The Rook has the same power in taking as the Queen, forwards, backwards, and sideways, but he cannot, like her, take any man diagonally.

For example, place the Rook in the centre of the board, and an opposing man on each of the squares numbered, and the Rook has the power of taking any one of the four; and he has the same power if the Pieces are one or two squares closer to him, or immediately surrounding him, in the direction indicated by the four figures. (See Diagram No. 4.)

Chessboard The Bishop. Chessboard

The Bishop moves diagonally forwards or backwards, to the extent of the Board. It follows, therefore, that [14]he travels throughout the game only on squares of the same color as the one on which he stands when the game begins, and that each player has a Bishop running on white squares, and one on black squares. When placed on a centre square of a clear board, he will be found to have a range of thirteen squares.

No. 5.

Chessboard

The Bishop takes, as he moves, diagonally, either forwards or backwards, his range extending, on unobstructed squares, to the extent of the diagonal line on which he travels. (See Diagram No. 5.)

Chessboard The Knight. Chessboard

The action of the Knight is peculiar, and not easy to describe. He is the only one of the Pieces which has the privilege of leaping over another man. The movements of the others are all dependent on their freedom from obstruction by their own and the enemy's men. For example, when the forces are duly ranged in order of [15] battle before the commencement of the game, the Knight is the only one of the eight capital Pieces which can be played before the Pawns are moved—King, Queen, Bishop, and Rook are all hemmed in by the rank of Pawns, which they cannot overleap; but the Knight, having the liberty of springing over the heads of other men, can be brought into the field at once. His move is one square in a straight line, and one in an oblique direction; or it may be perhaps better understood by saying that he moves two squares in a straight line, and one in a side direction.

No. 6.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.

His power and method of taking an opponent's man will be seen from the diagram (No. 6) on page 14.

In this situation, in the centre of the board, he would have the power of taking any one of the men stationed on the squares numbered, by removing the man and placing himself on the vacant square.

Chessboard The Pawn. Chessboard

The Pawn moves only one square at a time, and that straight forward, except in the act of capturing, when it takes one step diagonally to the right or left file on to the square occupied by the man taken, and continues on that file until it captures another man. It may, however, for its first move advance two steps, provided no hostile Pawn commands the first square over which he leaps, for, in that case, the adverse Pawn has the option of taking him in his passage, as if he had moved one step only. A Pawn is the only one of the forces which goes out of his direction to capture, and which has not the advantage of moving backwards; but it has one remarkable privilege, by which, on occasions, it becomes invaluable, whenever it reaches the extreme square of the file on which it travels, it is invested with the title and assumes the power of any superior Piece, except the King, which the player chooses. From this circumstance it frequently happens that one party, by skilful management of his [16]Pawns, contrives to have two, and sometimes even three Queens on the board at once, a combination of force which of course is irresistible.

As we before observed, the Pawn is the only man which captures in a direction different from his line of march. Suppose, at the opening of the game, White begins by playing King's Pawn to King's fourth square (see the article on Notation), Black may reply in the same manner with King's Pawn to King's fourth square, and neither Pawn can do more than remain an obstruction to the onward march of the other, but if Black answer instead with King's Bishop's Pawn to Bishop's fourth, or as in the diagram, with Queen's Pawn to Queen's fourth, then White, if he choose, may take the adverse Pawn from the board and place his own in its stead.

No. 7.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.



[17]

THE NOTATION ADOPTED TO DESCRIBE THE MOVES OF THE MEN.

There is no portion of an elementary work on Chess of so much importance to the learner, and none which requires more resolute mastering than this.

The notation may be called the language of the game and a knowledge of it is absolutely indispensable to every one who is himself ambitious of excelling, or who is desirous of appreciating the excellencies of other players.

Having marshalled the men in battle order, as shown in the first diagram, you will observe that each party has two ranks of men, on the first of which stand the superior Pieces, and on the next the eight Pawns. The eight squares which compose the first rank are each distinguished by the name of the Piece which occupies it when the men are first arranged. There are, therefore, the King's square, the King's Bishop's square, King's Knight's square, and King's Rook's square, and in like manner, the Queen's square, Queen's Bishop's square, Queen's Knight's and Queen's Rook's squares. The files, that is, the row of squares running from top to bottom of the board, are also named by the Pieces occupying the first square in each file. Thus each of the superior officers has a file or row of eight squares running from his end of the board to the corresponding Piece of the enemy, and every one of these eight squares takes its name from such officer.

Bear in mind that White names every square on the board, in accordance with its relative position to one of his eight Pieces, and that Black does the same. Hence it follows that Black's first squares are White's eighth, and vice versÔ.

Before proceeding further, it will be desirable for the student to familiarize himself with the respective moves of the Pieces, names of the squares, &c. A very little practice will enable him to do so, especially with the aid of any friend acquainted with them. He should, in the first place, accustom himself to the setting up the men in [18]order of battle; after a few repetitions of the process, and comparing their position with diagram No. 1, he will soon have no difficulty whatever in arranging them correctly without referring to the book. It will then be well to clear the board of all but a single Piece, and practise with that until perfect in its movements; another, and then another, may be added, until the action of every one is as familiar as the alphabet.

Suppose, as a first exercise, you begin by placing your Queen on her square (i.e., her first square), then play her to Q's 5th square, then (diagonally, observe) to Q. Rook's 8th square, then to King's Rook's 8th square, then to Q. R's square, and then home again to her square. It is proper to mention that the directions for moving a Piece are not usually printed in full, and that, according to the modern abbreviations in the present and other chess-books, these several instructions would be given thus:—

1. Q. to her sq.
2. Q. to her 5th.
3. Q. to her R's 8th.
4. Q. to K. R's 8th.
5. Q. to her R's sq.
6. Q. to her sq.

As a next exercise, put the Queen's Bishop on his square, beside the Queen, and play him as follows:—

1. Q. B. to K. R's 6th.
2. Q. B. to K. B's 8th.
3. Q. B. to Q. R's 3d.
4. Q. B. to his sq.

To these two Pieces now add the Queen's Knight, on his own square, and play as follows:—

1. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.
2. Q. Kt. to K's 4th.
3. Q. Kt. to K. B's 6th.
4. Q. Kt. to K's 8th.
5. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 7th.
6. Q. Kt. to Q. Kt's 5th.
7. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
8. Q. Kt. to his sq.

By taking all the Pieces in succession thus, you will speedily obtain sufficient knowledge of their movements to commence the opening of a game; but before attempting [19]this, it is needful for you to be acquainted with the technical terms in use among chess-players, and the code of laws which governs the game.


TECHNICAL TERMS IN USE AMONG CHESS-PLAYERS.

Castling.—Although, as a general rule, the move of the King is restricted to one square at a time, he has the privilege, under certain conditions, once in the game, of moving in conjunction with either of the Rooks two squares. This peculiar movement is called Castling, and is performed in the following manner:—If a player wishes to castle on his King's side of the board, he moves the King to K. Kt's sq., and then places the K's Rook on K. B's square. If he castles on the Queen's side, he plays his King to Q. B's sq, and Q's Rook to Q's sq. The object of this compound move is to place the royal Piece in safety, and at the same time bring the Rook from the corner square into better play.

The conditions under which a player is permitted to castle are:—1st. The King must not be in check. 2d. The King must not have moved. 3d. The Rook must not have moved. 4th. The King must not pass over or on to any square attacked by an enemy's man. And 5th. There must be no Piece, either of his own or the adversary's, between the King and the Rook.

In exemplification of the importance of castling, to escape from an attack, and to retort one on the adversary, see, presently, the diagram No. 8 (p. 24).

Check and Checkmate.—The King is said to be in check when he is attacked by any Piece or Pawn, for it being a fundamental law of chess that the King can never be taken, whenever any direct attack upon him is made, he must be warned of his danger by the cry of check, and the player is then compelled either to remove his King out of check, or parry the check by interposing a man between the King and the attacking Piece, or capture the checking man.

When he can do none of these three things, he is checkmated, [20]and the game won by the other side. (See diagrams Nos. 9 and 10.) When the King is directly attacked by the Piece played, it is a simple check; but when the Piece moved does not itself give check, but unmasks another which does, it is called a discovered check. (See diagram No. 8.) The third species of check is named the double check, where the King is attacked both by the Piece moved and the one discovered. The fourth description is called perpetual check, a case which arises when a player has two or more squares on which he can give check, and his opponent can only parry one check by affording an opportunity for another. If the first player then persists in the repetition of these particular checks, the game must be abandoned as drawn. (See diagram No. 11).

Doubled Pawn.—When two Pawns of the same color are on the same file, the front one is called a doubled pawn.

Drawn Game.—When neither party can give checkmate, the game is drawn. This may arise from several causes, as:—1st. Perpetual check. 2d. Where there is not sufficient force to effect a mate, as a King and a Knight only, or a King and two Knights, &c., &c. 3d. Where one party has force sufficient, but is ignorant of the proper mode of applying it, and thus fails to checkmate his helpless adversary within the fifty moves prescribed by the "Code". 4th. Where both parties persist in repeating the same move from fear of each other. 5th. Where both parties are left with the same force at the end, as a Queen against a Queen, a Rook against a Rook, and the like, when, except in particular cases, the game should be resigned as a drawn battle. And 6th. When one of the Kings is stalemated.

En Prise.—When a Piece or Pawn is in a situation to be taken by the enemy, it is said to be en prise. To put a piece en prise, is to play it so that it may be captured.

The Exchange.—When a player gains a Rook for a Bishop or a Knight, it is termed winning the exchange.

[21]

False Move.—Any illegal move, such as castling when the King has been moved or is in check, moving a Rook diagonally, or a Bishop like a Knight, is called a false or an "impossible" move.

Fool's Mate.—This is the simplest of all checkmates, being accomplished in two moves in the following manner:—

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. K. Kt. P. to K. Kt's 4th.1. K. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. B. P. to K. B's 4th.2. Q. to K. R's 5th, checkmate.

It cannot possibly be given by the first player.

Forced Move.—When a player has one only legal move at command, it is said to be a forced move.

Gambit.—This word is derived from an Italian phrase in wrestling, and signifies a movement by which the adversary is tripped up. In chess, this is attempted by the first player putting a Pawn en prise of the enemy early in the game, by which he is enabled more rapidly and effectually to develope his superior Pieces. There are several gambits, but the most important, and one which includes many others, is the King's gambit, commenced as follows:—

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. K. P. to K's 4th.1. K. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. B. P. to B's 4th.2. P. takes K. B. P.

The Pawn offered by the first player here at his second move is called the Gambit Pawn, and when taken by the adversary the opening becomes a gambit.

The varieties of the gambits are often designated by the names of the players who invented or first brought them into vogue—as the Muzio gambit, the Salvio gambit, the Allgaier gambit, the Lopez gambit; while others obtain their names from the opening moves of the first player, as the King's Bishop's gambit, which begins thus:—

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. K. P. to K's 4th.1. K. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. B. P. to B's 4th.2. P. takes P.
3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.

[22]and is so called because the K's Bishop is played out at the 3d move instead of the K's Knight.

There is also the Queen's gambit, of which the opening moves are—

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. Q. P. to Q's 4th.1. Q. P. to Q's 4th.
2. Q. B. P. to B's 4th.2. P. takes P.

The gambits are the most brilliant and animated of all the openings, full of hair-breadth 'scapes and perilous vicissitudes, but affording an infinitude of beautiful and daring combinations.

"Giuoco Piano," a solid and instructive modification of the King's Knight's game, is safe and for drawing games generally practised by the leading players. The opening moves are:

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.

To Interpose.—When the King is checked, or any valuable Piece in danger from the attack of an enemy, you are said to interpose a man when you play it between the attacked and attacking Piece.

Isolated Pawn.—A Pawn which stands alone, without the support and protection of other Pawns, is termed an isolated Pawn.

J'adoube.—A French expression, signifying "I arrange," or "I replace," which is used by a player when he touches a man merely to adjust its position on the board, without intending to play it. (See the 7th law.)

Minor Pieces.—The Bishop and Knight, in contradistinction to the Queen and Rook, are called Minor Pieces.

The Opposition.—A player is said to have the opposition when he can place his King directly in front of the adverse King, with only one square between them. This is often an important advantage in ending games.

Party.—From the French partie. Frequently used by modern writers instead of the word "game."

Passed Pawn.—-A Pawn is said to be a passed one [23]when the adversary has no Pawn to obstruct its march on the same file, or on either of the next files to the right or left.

Pion CoiffÚ, or Marked Pawn.—This is a description of odds but rarely given, and only when there is a vast disparity between the skill of the players. It consists in one party placing a cap or ring on one of his Pawns, and undertaking to checkmate his opponent with that particular Pawn. He is not allowed to Queen the Pawn, and if he loses it, or happens to checkmate his opponent with any other man, he forfeits the game. The Pawn usually capped is the King's Knight's, because it can be more readily and effectually surrounded by protecting Pieces.

To Queen a Pawn, or to advance a Pawn to Queen.—When a player has contrived to advance a Pawn to the eighth or last square of the file, it assumes the rank and power of a Queen, or of any other Piece he chooses, and he is then said to have queened his Pawn. (See the 21st law.)

Scholar's Mate.—A checkmate occasionally given at the opening of a game by a practised player to one but little tutored in the science. The following are the moves:—

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
3. Q. to K. R's 5th.3. Q. P. one.
4. Q. takes K. B. P., giving checkmate.

Smothered Mate.—A checkmate which is sometimes given by the Knight when the adverse King is hemmed in, or smothered, by his own forces. (See diagram No. 12.)

Stalemate.—When one party has his King so circumstanced that, not being at the moment in check, he cannot play him without going into check, and at the same time has no other Piece or Pawn to move instead, he is said to be stalemated, and the game is considered drawn. (See diagram No. 13.)

Taking a Pawn en Passant, or in Passing.—It has been shown before, in speaking of the action of the Pawn, that [24]he is limited in his march to one square forward at a time, when not capturing, and one square forward diagonally, either to the right or left, when he takes an adversary, but that he has the privilege, on being first played in the game, to advance two squares, unless in so doing he pass a square which is attacked by a hostile Pawn; in which case the opponent may, at his option, permit him to make the two steps forward, and there remain, or may capture him in his passage in the same way as if he had moved but one step.


ILLUSTRATIONS OF TECHNICAL TERMS.

The Operation of "Castling;" and "Discovered Check."

No. 8.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.

In this situation the white King is threatened with what is called "a discovered check," that is, his opponent, by removing the Bishop, would discover check from the Queen, a proceeding in the present instance, which would [25]speedily involve the loss of the game to White. Not being at the moment in check, however, and having moved neither King nor Rook, and there being no intervening Piece between the King and his own Rook, White is enabled to castle, giving check to the adverse King at the same time, and win the game easily, for Black has no square to which he can move his King without going into check, and is consequently obliged to interpose his Q. at K. B's second, or K. B's third square, in either case being checkmated in two more moves, as you will soon be able to see.

Checkmate.

No. 9.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.

The above position represents the appearance of the forces on each side towards the end of a game, and will assist to explain the application of two or three of the technical terms described in the present section, as well as to exhibit the King in a situation of checkmate. You already understand that the moves at chess are played by [26]each party alternately; in this case it is White's turn to play, and he will checkmate his antagonist in two moves. Place the chess-men on your board exactly in the order they stand in the diagram; having done this, suppose yourself to be playing the White men, and take the Black King's Pawn with your Queen, in the manner before shown, i.e., by taking the Pawn from the board and stationing your Queen on the square it occupied. By this act, you not only take his Pawn, but you attack his King, and must apprise him of his danger by calling "check." He has now two ways only of parrying this check. It is clear he cannot move his King, because the only two squares to which he could move without going into check are occupied by his own men; he is forced then either to take the Queen with his K. B's Pawn, or to interpose the Bishop at King's second square. If he take the Queen with his K. B's Pawn, you must reply by playing your King's Bishop (which you will know by the color of the diagonal on which he travels) to K. Kt's sixth square, crying "check." Examine the position attentively, and you will find that Black has no square to which he can move his King, the only vacant one being attacked by your Queen's Bishop, that he has nothing wherewith to take the Bishop that has given check, and neither Piece nor Pawn with which to interpose between it and his King, and that consequently, he is not only checked, but checkmated. In like manner, if, at his first move, instead of capturing your Queen, he interpose his Bishop at King's second square, you immediately take the Bishop with your Queen, who is protected by her Bishop, and say "checkmate."[A]

[A] We append a diagram here, showing a position which has frequently been misapprehended by unpractised players.

By inspecting the diagram it will be seen that the White King is in check of the Black Queen. By the simple move of the White Rook to K. Kt's 5th square, checking the Black King, and at the same time discovering check by the White Queen, Black is checkmated, although having by far the strongest force of men. We give the position to show that any Piece or Pawn, although employed in covering a check of its own King, has nevertheless the power to check the adverse King.

No. 10.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.




Perpetual Check.

The diagram on page 28 will enable you to understand what is meant by perpetual check as well as the most [27]elaborate arrangement of the men could do. Place the men on your chess-board according to the diagram, suppose yourself to be playing the white Pieces, and that it is your turn to move. Your adversary, you will observe, has the advantage in point of force, but this is counterbalanced by the situation, which enables you to draw the game. To do this, you must first play your Queen to one of the three squares where she will check the King, i.e., to K's 4th, Q's 5th, or Q. B's 6th; it is indifferent which, say, therefore, Q. to K's 4th (check). Black has no option, his King cannot move, he must interpose his Queen. If now you were to take the Queen you would lose the game, on account of his two Pawns; but instead of doing so, [28]you play the Queen to King's 8th sq, giving check. The black Queen must again interpose; you repeat the check at K's 4th, Black can only parry it with his Queen, and you may persist in giving the same two checks, ad infinitum. In such cases, the game is resigned as "drawn by perpetual check."

No. 11.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.



Smothered Mate.

This is a familiar example of smothered mate, which you will find can be effected by no other Piece than the Knight. White first move is, Queen to her 5th square checking. Black is obliged to retreat his King to the R's sq., because, were he to play him to his B's sq., the Q would checkmate at once. Upon the King retiring, White gives check with his Kt. at K. B's 7th; this brings the King back again to Knight's sq., and affords to White an opportunity of giving double check, which he does by moving the Knight to K. Rook's 6th, checking with both [29]Q. and Knight; as before, the King must go to Rook's sq.; and now follows a beautiful move—White plays his Queen down to K. Kt's 8th (next square to the Black King), giving check; the King cannot take on account of the Knight; he is compelled, therefore, to capture with his Rook, and the Knight then gives the smothered mate at K. B's 7th square.

No. 12.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


Stalemate.
(See Diagram on page 30.)

Here you observe that White has the great advantage of a Queen against a Rook; but with all this, and the move to boot, it is impossible for him to do more than draw the game. It is evident that he cannot move his Queen from the front of his King on account of exposing him to check with the Rook. If he move his King, Black takes the Queen, and the game is drawn. And lastly, if he take the Rook with his Queen, he places the adverse King in the position before described of stalemate.

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No. 13.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.



ON THE RELATIVE VALUE OF THE CHESS FORCES.

An attempt to establish a scale of powers whereby the relative values of the several men could be estimated with mathematical exactitude, although it has frequently engaged the attention of scientific minds, appears to be an expenditure of ingenuity and research upon an unattainable object. So ever varying, so much dependent on the mutations of position which every move occasions, and on the augmented power which it acquires when combined with other forces, is the proportionate worth of this with that particular man, that it would seem to be beyond the reach of computation to devise a formula by which it can be reckoned with precision. But still an approximation to correctness has been made, and the result arrived at gives the following as the ultimate respective values:—

[31]
Pawn= 1.00
Knight= 3.05
Bishop= 3.50
Rook= 5.48
Queen= 9.94

The King, from the nature of the game, which does not admit of his being exchanged or captured, is invaluable, and he is not, therefore, included in the calculations.

The Pawn, it is seen, is the least valuable of all the men, the Knight being worth at least three Pawns.

The Bishops and Knights are practically considered of equal value, although there is a difference in the estimate here given.

A Rook is of the value of five Pawns and a fraction, and may be exchanged for a minor Piece and two Pawns. Two Rooks may be exchanged for three minor Pieces.

The Queen is usually reckoned equal, in average situations, to two Rooks and a Pawn, but towards the end of a game she is hardly so valuable as two Rooks.

These comparative values may be of service to the student in general cases of exchanging men, but he will find in practice the relative worth of his soldiers is modified by so many circumstances of time, opportunity, and position, that nothing but experience can ever teach him to determine accurately in every case "which to give up and which to keep."


THE CHESS CODE.
OR, LAWS OF THE GAME.

DEFINITIONS OF TERMS USED.

Whenever the word "Umpire" is used herein, it stands for any Committee having charge of Matches or Tournaments, with power to determine questions of chess-law and rules; or for any duly appointed Referee, or Umpire; for the bystanders, when properly appealed to; or for any person, present or absent, to whom may be referred any disputed questions; or for any other authority whomsoever having power to determine such questions.

When the word "move" is used it is understood to mean a legal move or a move to be legally made according to these laws.

When the word "man" or "men" is used, it is understood that it embraces both Pieces and Pawns.

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THE CHESS-BOARD AND MEN.

The Chess-board must be placed with a white square at the right-hand corner.

If the Chess-board be wrongly placed, or if there is a deficiency in number, or a misplacement of the men, at the beginning of the game, the game shall be annulled, provided the error is discovered before the second player makes four moves.

FIRST MOVE AND COLOR.

The right of first move must be determined by lot.

The right of first move shall alternate, whether the game be won, lost or drawn.

Whenever a game shall be annulled, the party having the move in that game shall have it in the next game. An annulled game must be considered, in every respect, the same as if it had never been begun.

CONCESSIONS.

The concession of an indulgence by one player does not give him the right of a similar or other indulgence from his opponent.

ERRORS.

If, during the course of the game, it be discovered that any error or illegality has been committed in the moves of the pieces, the moves must be retraced, and the necessary correction made, without penalty.

If the moves cannot be correctly retraced the game must be annulled.

If a man be dropped from the board and moves made during its absence, such moves must be retraced and the man restored. If this cannot be done, to the satisfaction of the Umpire, the game must be annulled.

CASTLING.

The King can be Castled only:—

When neither the King nor the Castling Rook has been moved, and

Where the King is not in check, and

Where all the squares between the King and Rook are unoccupied, and

Where no hostile man attacks the square on which the King is to be placed, or the square he crosses.

In Castling, the King must be moved first, or before the Rook is quitted. If the Rook be quitted before the King is touched, the opposing player may demand that the move of the Rook shall stand without the Castling being completed.

The penalty of moving the King prohibits Castling.

EN PASSANT.

Taking the Pawn "en Passant," when the only possible move, is compulsory.

PROMOTING THE PAWN.

A Pawn reaching the eighth square must be at once exchanged for any piece of its own color (except the King) that the player of the Pawn may elect.

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CHECK.

No penalty can be enforced for an offence committed against these rules in consequence of a false announcement of "check." When check is given it is not obligatory to announce the check.

"J'ADOUBE."

"J'adoube," "I adjust," or words to that effect, cannot protect a player from any of the penalties imposed by these laws, unless the man or men touched, obviously need adjustment, and unless such notification be distinctly uttered before the man, or men, be touched, and only the player whose turn it is to move is allowed so to adjust.

The hand having once quitted the man, but for an instant, the move must stand.

Men overturned or displaced accidentally may be replaced by either player, without notice.

A wilful displacement, or overturning of any of the men, forfeits the game.

PENALTIES.

Penalties can be enforced only at the time an offence is committed, and before any move is made thereafter.

A player touching one of his men, when it is his turn to play, must move it. If it cannot be moved he must move his King. If the King cannot move, the offender must move a man selected by his opponent.

For playing two moves in succession the adversary may elect which move shall stand.

For touching an adversary's man, when it cannot be captured, the offender must move his King. If the King cannot move, the offender must move a man selected by his opponent. But if the man touched can be legally taken, it must be captured.

For playing a man to a square to which it cannot be legally moved, the adversary, at his option, may require him to move the man legally, or to move the King. If the latter penalty be exacted, and the King cannot legally be moved, the offender must move any piece designated by the opposing player.

For illegally capturing an adversary's man, the offender must move his King, or legally capture the man, as his opponent may elect. If neither is possible, the offender must move a man selected by his opponent.

For attempting to Castle illegally, the player doing so, must move either the King or Rook, as his adversary may dictate.

For touching more than one of the player's own men, he must move either man that his opponent may name.

For touching more than one of the adversary's men, the offender must capture the one named by his opponent, or if either cannot be captured, he may be required to move the King or capture the man which can be taken, at the adversary's option; or, if neither can be captured, then the King must be moved.

A player moving into check may be required, by the opposing player, either to move the King elsewhere, or to move some other piece designated by the opposing player.

For discovering check on his own King, the player must either legally move the man touched, or move the King at his adversary's option. In case neither move can be made he must move a piece designated by his adversary.

While in check, for touching or moving a man which does not cover the check, the player may be required to recover with another piece, or move the King, as the opposing player may elect.

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ADJOURNED GAME.

Upon a game being adjourned, the player whose turn it is to move shall seal his move. Sealing a move consists in writing it legibly on a piece of paper which shall remain in the keeping of a third party during the adjournment.

Upon the resumption of an adjourned game the position existing at the time of adjournment shall be set up and the sealed move made on the board.

If the position existing at the time of adjournment cannot be ascertained the game shall be annulled.

If upon opening a sealed move the record cannot be interpreted as expressing a legal move, the offending player may be required to move his King, or, if the King cannot legally be moved, a piece designated by his opponent. If the record can be interpreted as expressing either of two moves, the offender shall make the one selected by his opponent.

DRAWN GAMES.

A game is drawn—

(a) When the players agree to treat it as drawn.

(b) Upon the proof by either player that fifty moves have been made on each side without a piece being captured.

(c) When either player claims a draw upon his turn to play, and proves that the existing position has occurred at least twice before during the game.

(d) When either player claims a draw and demonstrates that he can subject the opposing King to an endless series of checks.

(e) When a stale-mate occurs.

TIME LIMIT.

The penalty for exceeding the time limit is the forfeiture of the game.

It shall be the duty of each player, as soon as his move be made, to stop his own register of time and start that of his opponent, whether the time be taken by clocks, sand-glass, or otherwise. No complaint respecting an adversary's time can be considered, unless this rule be strictly complied with. But nothing herein is intended to affect the penalty for exceeding the time limit as registered.

ABANDONING THE GAME.

If either player abandon the game by quitting the table in anger, or in an otherwise offensive manner; or by momentarily resigning the game; or refuses to abide by the decision of the Umpire, the game must be scored against him.

If a player absent himself from the table, or manifestly ceases to consider his game, when it is his turn to move, the time so consumed shall, in every case, be registered against him.

DISTURBANCE.

Any player wilfully disturbing his adversary shall be admonished; and if such disturbance be repeated, the game shall be declared lost by the player so offending, provided the player disturbed then appeals to the Umpire.

[35]

THE UMPIRE.

It is the duty of the Umpire to determine all questions submitted to him according to these laws, when they apply, and according to his best judgment when they do not apply.

No deviation from these laws can be permitted by an Umpire, even by mutual or general consent of the players, after a match or tournament shall have been commenced.

The decision of the Umpire is final, and binds both and all the players.

RULES FOR PLAYING THE GAME AT ODDS.

I. In games where one player gives the odds of a piece, or "the exchange," or allows his opponent to count drawn games as won, or agrees to check-mate with a particular man, or on a particular square, he has the right to choose the men, and to move first, unless an arrangement to the contrary is agreed to between the combatants.

II. When the odds of Pawn and one move, or Pawn and more than one move, are given, the Pawn given must be the King's Bishop's Pawn when not otherwise previously agreed on.

III. When the odds of two or more moves are given, the player receiving the odds shall begin the game with these moves, but may not, in making them, advance any piece beyond his fourth rank.

IV. When a player gives the odds of a Rook he may move his King as though to castle with the Rook given, provided the square of the missing Rook has been unoccupied throughout the game, and provided the ordinary conditions as to squares and the King are complied with.

V. When the odds of a Pawn, Knight, Bishop, or Rook, are given, it is understood that the King's Bishop's Pawn, or the Queen's Knight, Queen's Bishop or Queen's Rook, is intended unless special agreement to the contrary is made.



GENERAL RULES AND OBSERVATIONS.

Concerning the King.—It is mostly advisable to castle the King pretty early in the game, and to do so on the King's side, because he is less subject to an attack, and better able to repel one on that side than the other.

Be fearful, when castled on the King's side, of permitting an adverse Knight to gain safe possession of your King's Bishop's 4th square, and remember that it is seldom prudent in an inexperienced player to advance the Pawns on the side his King has castled.

Be cautious of playing your Queen in front of your King and in subjecting yourself to a discovered check. It is better when check is given to your King to interpose a man that attacks the checking Piece than with one that does not. Beware of giving useless checks to your adversary's King, but when, by checking, you can oblige him to move, and thus deprive him of the right to castle, it is generally good play to do so. It is sometimes useful [36]to give a series of checks, and even sacrifice a Piece, to force the King into the middle of the board, where he may be subjected to the attacks of your other men.

Do not in all cases take an enemy's Pawn which stands before your King,—it may serve sometimes as a protection to him; and bear in mind that towards the termination of a game, especially when the superior Pieces have been taken off the field, the King should be made to compensate for his previous inactivity, by being busily engaged. The fate of the game is then dependent for the most part on the skill displayed in the management of the King.

Concerning the Queen.—The Queen is so powerful and important a Piece at chess that she should rarely be employed to defend or attack any point if you can do it as well with a subordinate.

It is not good to play the Queen out in the game at the beginning, because she can be attacked by inferior Pieces, and is compelled to retire with the loss of many moves.

Be careful, too, when about to capture a distant Pawn or Piece, that you do not remove your Queen too far from the immediate point of action. A skilful player will often permit you to win a Pawn with the Queen, that he may prevent her returning in time to rescue your King from his attack. The power of the Queen is wonderfully greater when she is aided and protected by other Pieces than when she goes forth unsupported; it is generally injudicious, therefore, to make an attack with her unless in combination with some other of your forces.

Concerning the Rook.—The Rook is a most important officer, yet few players even amongst the best avail themselves sufficiently of his power. He has seldom much scope for action in the early part of the engagement, but when the field is thinned no time should be lost in bringing him into action. You should then endeavor to double your Rooks, that is, to place them one before the other on the same file: in this situation, mutually sustaining one another, their potency on a clear field is equal to the Queen's.

It is usually good play to get command of an open file, [37]that is to say, a file which is occupied by no other man, by stationing a Rook at one end of it. When you have thus gained possession of the file, should your opponent try to dispossess you of it, by playing one of his Rooks on the same file, it is frequently better to defend with your other Rook than to take his or remove your own. You will often embarrass your adversary, too, if you can manage to post a Rook on his second rank, say at your King's 7th or Queen's 7th square. In this position he generally makes an attack on the Pawns unmoved, and compels the enemy to lose time in defending them, while you can bring more forces into action.

One of the strongest reasons for playing out your Pieces early in the battle, is, that while at home they are not only themselves inactive, but they utterly retard the movements of your Rooks. In an unskilfully developed game it is a common occurrence to see the victory won before the defeated player's Rooks have ever moved.

Concerning the Bishop.—When the game is opened by each party with King's Pawn to King's 4th square, the King's Bishop is somewhat superior to the Queen's, because it can be sooner brought into play, and may be made to bear immediately on the King's weak point, his Bishop's Pawn. It is desirable therefore generally to exchange your Queen's Bishop or Queen's Knight for the adversary's King's Bishop. The King's Bishop should rarely or never be played to the Queen's 3d square before the Queen's Pawn is moved. His best position, as we have remarked above, is to Queen's Bishop's 4th square, where he attacks the opponent's King's Bishop's Pawn. If your antagonist then challenges an exchange of Bishops by moving his Queen's Bishop to King's 3d square, it is not always prudent to accept it, because although you may double the Pawns on his King's file, you at the same time afford him an open range for his King's Rook when he has castled. The best play in such a case is, therefore, to retreat your King's Bishop to Queen's Knight's 3d square.

Be careful, as a general rule, in an open game, not to [38]move your Queen's Pawn one square before you bring out the King's Bishop, as by so doing you leave him but the King's 2d square on which to move, and there his position is defensive rather than attacking.

If strong in Pawns towards the conclusion of the game, endeavor to get rid of the enemy's Bishops, because they can impede the march of your Pawns more readily than either the Rooks or Knights.

When the other men are exchanged off, and you remain with a Bishop and two or three Pawns, it is often proper to keep your Pawns on squares of a different color from those on which your Bishop travels, as he can then prevent the opposing King from approaching them. If, however, you have the worst of the game, it is mostly better then to keep them on the same color as the Bishop, that he may defend them.

Supposing you have Pawns only at the end of a game, and the adversary has a Bishop, it is generally advisable to move the Pawns as soon as possible to squares of a different color from the diagonals on which he moves.

Do not indiscriminately exchange your Bishops for Knights, or vice versÔ. Two Bishops at the finish of a game are stronger than two Knights, and one Knight generally more useful than a single Bishop.

Concerning the Knight.—The Knight is at once the most striking and most beautiful of all the Pieces. The singularity of its evolutions, by which it is enabled to overleap the other men and wind its way into the penetralia of the adverse ranks, and if attacked leap back again within the boundary of its own, has rendered it the favorite Piece of leading players in every country.

The assault of the Knight is more subtle and dangerous than that of any other Piece, because he attacks without putting himself en prise, and his attack can never be resisted by the interposition of another man.

At the commencement of a game, the best place for the King's Knight is at K. B's 3d sq.; it there attacks your adversary's K's Pawn, if it has been moved two squares, and offers no impediment to the playing out your [39]King's Bishop, and prevents the adversary from placing his Queen on your King Rook's 4th sq., where she would often be a source of restraint and danger to your King. Many persons prefer playing the K. Kt. to K's 2d at the second move, from the mistaken notion that the K. B's P. should be moved before the Knight is played to B's 3d; this is an error, and generally leads to a very bad game.

When you have brought out your Q. Kt. to B's 3d, it is frequently advisable, at a proper opportunity, to get him round by K's 2d sq. to the K. Kt's 3d, where he exercises a very important influence, by threatening, whenever the square is left unguarded, to post himself on K. B's 5th.

A Knight with three or four Pawns, at the end of a game, has an advantage over a Bishop with an equal number of Pawns, because he can leap from white to black, and thus attack the Pawns on either colored squares, whereas the Bishop can attack them only when they move on squares of the color of his diagonals. In similar circumstances, however, he is not so useful in defending as a Bishop or a Rook, since if forced to remove he ceases to defend, while the Rook or Bishop may retreat and still protect.

Concerning the Pawns.—Struck by the scope and power of the higher Pieces, young players commonly overlook the homely Pawns, or deem them scarcely worthy of regard, and are amazed to learn that the combinations of these simple elements are among the most refined and arduous studies of the science. Yet such is the fact, and without a thorough comprehension of their quiet but remarkable predominance in almost every circumstance of the game, it is impossible for any one to attain a high degree of excellence.

It is generally advantageous for your Pawns to occupy the middle of the board, because when there they greatly retard the movements of the opposing forces. The King's Pawn and Queen's Pawn, at their fourth squares, are well posted, but it is not easy to maintain them in that position, and if you are driven to advance one of them, the power [40]of both is much diminished. It is well, therefore, not to be too eager to establish two Pawns abreast in the centre until you are fully able to sustain them there.

When you have two Pawns abreast, the King and Queen's, for instance, at their fourth squares, should the adversary attack one of them with a Pawn, it is occasionally better to advance the Pawn that is attacked another step, than to take the Pawn.

The Pawns, however, should seldom be far advanced, unless they can be properly sustained by the Pieces. Pawns at their fourth squares are therefore mostly more powerful than at their sixth.

The King's Bishop's Pawn having no support but that of the King, is usually the point to which the first attack is directed, and more than ordinary care should be taken to preserve it. It is rarely good play to move the King's Bishop's Pawn to Bishop's 3d early in the game.

As a general rule, it is not advisable to move King's Knight's Pawn or Queen's Knight's Pawn early in the game. The former played to K. Kt's 3d square will often allow your adversary to play his Queen's Bishop to your King's Rook's 3d square, a dangerous move when you have castled on King's side.

After castling, it is generally proper not to move the Knight's Pawn that is before your King, until you are obliged.

In a diagonal line of Pawns you should endeavor to preserve the Pawn at the head of them. Pawns, when united, have great strength; but when separated, their power is sensibly lessened.

A passed Pawn is mostly serviceable when supported by another Pawn.

A doubled Pawn is not in all cases a disadvantage, especially if it is united with other Pawns. The worst kind of doubled Pawn is one on a Rook's file; while the most advantageous is the King's Bishop's Pawn doubled on the King's file, because it strengthens your middle Pawns and opens a file for your King's Rook.

The Pawn being less important than a Piece, it is usually [41]better to defend with it than with a Piece. For the same reason it is likewise better to protect a Pawn with a Pawn than with a Piece. No Piece can interpose between the attack of a Pawn, it can therefore frequently check the King with great advantage.

Be cautious generally of advancing the Pawns far on either side, till you see on which your opponent castles; and remember, when approaching the end of a game, where you have Pawns, or even a Pawn, against a minor Piece, that you may win, but that your opponent, except in very rare cases, cannot, and that two Pawns in any situation can protect themselves against the adverse King.


MAXIMS AND ADVICE FOR AN INEXPERIENCED PLAYER.

There is nothing that will improve you so much as playing with good players; never refuse, therefore, when any one offers you odds, to accept them: you cannot expect a proficient to feel much interest in playing with you upon even terms, and as you are sure to derive both amusement and instruction from him, it is but fair that he should name the conditions. It will soon happen that you yourself will be able to give odds to many amateurs whom you meet; when this is the case, avoid, if possible, playing them even, or you are likely to acquire an indolent, neglectful habit of play, which it will be very difficult to throw off.

Never permit your hand to hover over the board, or indeed to approach it, until you have completely made up your mind what Piece to move; a contrary habit begets a feeling of indecision that is fatal to success. Play invariably according to the laws of the game, neither taking back a move yourself, nor allowing your opponent to recall one. Do not exhibit impatience when your adversary is long in making his move. His slowness is a tacit compliment to your skill, and enables you to play with proportionate quickness, because while he is meditating on his next step you can take advantage of the time to consider what shall be your rejoinder; besides, it is absolutely [42]necessary for every one desirous of excelling at chess to play slowly. A fine player examines occasionally from five to twenty or more moves on each side: can this be done in a moment? It is easy enough to play quick against inferior play; but against equal and very good play one cannot play quick without losing.

Learn to play indifferently either with the white or black men. Do not play too many games at a sitting—and never suffer the loss of a game to occasion you much disquietude. Think of how many thousand games a Philidor must have lost before he attained his highest excellence; besides, the loss of one well-fought game with a fine practitioner will do more towards your improvement than the gain of ten light skirmishes with weaker players than yourself. Endeavor to play all your Pieces equally well. Many young players have a predilection for a particular Piece, as the Knight or the Queen, and lose both time and position in trying to prevent exchanges of their favorite. In opening your game, endeavor to bring your superior officers into action speedily, but avoid all premature attacks. Take care not to play a Piece to a square where it impedes the action of another, and beware of venturing an unsupported Piece in the adversary's game.

If subjected to a violent attack, you may often disconcert your opponent by compelling the exchange of two or three Pieces. When, however, you are about to exchange officers, you must calculate not only their ordinary value, but their peculiar worth in the situation in question; for example, a Rook is generally more valuable than a Knight or a Bishop; but it will happen, that by exchanging a Rook for one of the latter you may greatly improve your game.

It is mostly good play to exchange the Pieces off when you are superior in power, so that when you have the odds of a Piece given to you by a finished player, you should endeavor to exchange as often as you can consistently with safety.

When an exchange of two or more Pieces appears inevitable, [43]look closely to see whether it is better for you to take first or to compel your opponent to do so. When one of the enemy is completely in your power, do not be too eager to make the capture—there may perhaps be a move of importance which you can make before you take him. Beware also of snatching hastily a proffered man, it may be only given as a bait to catch a more important advantage from you.

If at the end of a game you remain with Pawns against a Knight and find it difficult to evade his repeated checks, recollect that by placing your King on the same diagonal as the Knight, with but one intervening square between them, you cannot again be checked under three moves.

When you have lost a game which has cost you great attention, it is a good practice to play it over afterwards in private, and endeavor to discover where the error occurred through which your opponent gained his first advantage. This custom will improve both your memory and your play.


ON THE SEVERAL OPENINGS OR BEGINNINGS OF GAMES.

Before proceeding to the consideration of the various methods of commencing the game, it is advisable for you to recur to the preceding sections, which treat of the arrangement of the men—the moves of the men—their relative powers—the technical terms in use among players—and the laws of the game. When you have familiarized yourself with these, it will be time for you to direct your attention to that most important feature in the game of chess—the art of opening the game.

There are several modes of beginning the game, but the following are the principal:—

1st. Each player begins by moving his King's Pawn to King's 4th square, and the first player then moves King's Knight to King's Bishop's 3d square. This is called the King's Knight's opening.

2d. Each player commences by moving his King's Pawn to King's 4th square, and then he who has the [44]first move plays King's Bishop to Queen's Bishop's 4th square. This is known as the King's Bishop's opening.

3d. Each player opens with King's Pawn to King's 4th square, and the first plays Queen's Bishop's Pawn to Bishop's 3d square. This is termed the Queen's Bishop's Pawn's opening.

4th. Each player begins with King's Pawn to King's 4th square, and the first follows with King's Bishop's Pawn to Bishop's 4th square. This is called the King's gambit.

Of these four openings on the King's side there are many modifications, of which each has its appropriate appellation; there are also several openings begun on the Queen's side, but the four above-named are those most generally practised, and with them you should be thoroughly conversant before advancing further.


PRELIMINARY GAME.

Preparatory to the investigation of the several openings treated of in the following chapters, it may not be uninstructive to give a short game which shall exhibit the application of some technical phrases in use at chess, and at the same time show a few of the most prominent errors into which an inexperienced player is likely to fall.

In this game, as in all the analyses which follow, the reader will be supposed to play the White Pieces and to have the first move, although, as it has been before remarked, it is advisable for you to accustom yourself to play with either Black or White, for which purpose it is well to practise the attack, first with the White and then with the Black Pieces.

 WHITE.  BLACK.
1. K's P. to K's 4th.1. K's P. to K's 4th.

When the men are first arranged in battle order, it is seen that the only Pieces which have the power of moving are the Knights, and that to liberate the others it is indispensably necessary to move a Pawn. Now, as the [45]King's Pawn, on being moved, gives freedom both to the Queen and to the King's Bishop, it is more frequently played at the beginning of the game than any other. You will remember, in speaking of the Pawns it was shown that on certain conditions they have the privilege of going either one or two steps when they are first moved.

2. K's B. to Q's B's 4th.2. K's B. to Q's B's 4th.

Thus far the game illustrative of the King's Bishop's opening is correctly begun. Each party plays his King's Bishop thus, because it attacks the most vulnerable point of the adverse position, viz., the King's Bishop's Pawn.

3. Q. B's Pawn to B's 3d.3. Q's Knight to B's 3d.

In playing this Pawn your object is afterwards to play Queen's Pawn to Queen's 4th square, and thus establish your Pawns in the centre; but Black foresees the intention, and thinks to prevent its execution by bringing another Piece to bear upon the square.

4. Q's Pawn to Q's 4th.4. Pawn takes Q's Pawn.
5. Q's B's Pawn takes Pawn.5. K's B. takes Pawn.

Here you have played without due consideration. Black's third move of Queen's Knight to Bishop's 3d square was a bad one, and afforded you an opportunity of gaining a striking advantage, but omitting this, you have enabled him to gain a valuable Pawn for nothing. Observe, now, your reply to his third move was good enough, (4. Queen's Pawn to Queen's 4th square), but when he took your Pawn with his, instead of taking again, you ought to have taken his King's Bishop's Pawn with your Bishop, giving check: the game would then most probably have gone on thus:—

5. K's B. takes K. B. Pawn (ch.)5. K. takes Bishop.
6. Queen to K. R's 5th (check).6. K. to his B's square.
7. Queen takes K's Bishop (check).

In this variation, you see Black has lost his King's Bishop's Pawn, and what is worse, has lost his privilege of castling, by being forced to move his King; and although for a moment he had gained a Bishop for a Pawn, it was quite clear that he must lose a Bishop in return by the check of the adverse Queen at King's [46]Rook's 5th square. It is true that he need not have taken the Bishop, but still his King must have moved, and White could then have taken the King's Knight with his Bishop, having always the better position.

But now to proceed with the actual game:—

6. K's Knight to K's B's 3d.6. Queen to K's B's 3d.

Bringing out the Knight is good play; you not only threaten to win his Bishop, but you afford yourself an opportunity of castling whenever it may be needful. Black would have played better in retiring the Bishop from the attack to Queen's Knight 3d square than in supporting it with the Queen.

7. Knight takes Bishop.7. Queen takes Knight.

Both parties played well in their last moves. You rightly took off the Bishop, because supported by the Queen he menaced your Queen's Kt's Pawn, and Black properly retook with his Queen instead of the Knight, because having a Pawn ahead, it was his interest to exchange off the Queens.

8. Q's Knight to Q's 2d.8. K's Knight to B's 3d.

You played correctly here in not exchanging Queens, and also in protecting your Bishop and your King's Pawn, both of which were attacked by the adverse Queen; but all this might have been done without impeding the movements of any of your Pieces, by simply playing Queen to King's 2d sq.; as it is, the Knight entirely shuts your Queen's Bishop from the field. Black properly brings another Piece to the attack of your King's Pawn:—

9. K. B's Pawn to B's 3d.9. Q's Knight to King's 4th.

In protecting the King's Pawn with your K. Bishop's Pawn, you are guilty of a very common error among young players; as you improve, you will find that it is rarely good play to move the K. Bishop's Pawn to the third square—in the present instance, for example, you have deprived yourself of the power of castling, at least for some time, since the adverse Queen now commands the very square upon which your King, in castling on his own side, has to move. Black's last move is much more [47]sensible. He again attacks your Bishop, and by the same move brings his Q's Knight into co-operation with the King's, on the weak point of your position:—

10. Pawn to Q. Kt's 3d.10. Q. takes Queen's Rook.

This is a serious blunder indeed. In your anxiety to save the threatened Bishop, which you feared to withdraw to Q. Kt's 3d sq., on account of the adverse Knight's giving check at your Queen's 3d square, you have actually left your Q's Rook en prise! Black takes it, of course, and having gained such an important advantage, ought to win easily.

11. Castles, (i.e., plays
K to his Kt's sq., and
Rook to K. B's sq.)
11. Q's Kt. takes Bishop.
12. Kt. takes Kt.12. Castles.
13. Queen to her 2d.13. Q. B's Pawn to B's 4th.

Your last move is very subtle; finding the mistake that Black had committed in not retreating his Queen directly after winning the Rook, you determine, if possible, to prevent her escape by gaining command of all the squares she can move to. Seeing the danger, Black throws forward this Pawn to enable him, if possible, to bring the Queen off, by playing her to her 5th sq., giving check.

14. Bishop to Q. Kt's 2d.14. Q. takes Q. R's Pawn.

This move of the Bishop is well timed; it does not, to be sure, prevent the Queen from escaping for a move or two, but it gives you an attack, and very great command of the field.

15. Q. to K. Kt's 5th.15. Knight to K's sq.

Very well played on both sides. By playing the Queen to K. Kt's 5th, you threatened to win his Knight by at once taking it with your Bishop, which he could not retake without opening check on his King. Instead of so moving, you might have played the Knight to Q. Rook's 5th sq., in which case, by afterwards moving the Rook to Q. Rook's square, it would have been impossible for his Queen to get away.

16. Q. to King's 3d.16. K. R's Pawn to R's 3d.

You prudently retreated your Queen to guard her Knight's [48]Pawn, which it was important to save, on account of its protection to the Knight. Black played the King's R's Pawn to prevent your Queen returning to the same post of attack.

17. K. R's P. to R's 3d.17. K. to his R's sq.

Here are two instances of what is called "lost time" at chess, neither move serving in the slightest degree to advance the game of the player. That you should have overlooked the opportunity of gaining the adverse Queen was to be expected. Similar advantages present themselves in every game between young players, and are unobserved.

18. K. B's Pawn to B's 4th.18. Q. Kt's Pawn to Kt's 3d.

Again you have failed to see a most important move; you might have taken the K. Rook's Pawn with your Queen, giving check safely, because Black could not take your Queen without being in check with your Bishop. All this time, too, your opponent omits to see the jeopardy his Queen is in, and that as far as practical assistance to his other Pieces is concerned, she might as well be off the board.

19. K. Kt's Pawn to Kt's 4th.19. Q. Kt's Pawn to Q. Kt's 4th.

Your last move is far from good. By thus attacking your Knight, Black threatens to win a Piece, because upon playing away the Knight you must leave the Bishop unprotected.

20. Pawn to K. Kt's 5th.20. Pawn takes Knight.

Although your Knight was thus attacked, it might have been saved very easily. In the first place, by your taking the adversary's Q. B's Pawn, threatening to take his K's Rook, on his removing which, or interposing the Q's Pawn, you could have taken the Pawn which attacked your Knight; or, in the second place, by moving your Queen to her 2d square. In the latter case, if Black ventured to take the Knight, you would have won his Queen by taking the K. Kt's Pawn with your Bishop, giving check, and thus exposing his Queen to yours. Black would have been obliged to parry the check, either by taking the [49]Bishop or removing his King, and you would then have taken his Queen. This position is very instructive, and merits attentive examination.

21. B. to Q. B's 3d.21. Pawn takes Q. Kt's Pawn.
22. Pawn to K. R's 4th.22. Pawn to Q. Kt's 7th.

In such a position, the advance of your King's flank Pawns is a process too dilatory to be very effective.

23. Pawn to K. B's 5th.23. Pawn to Q. Kt's 8th,
becoming a Queen.

Now the fault of your tortoise-like movements with the Pawns becomes fatally evident. Black has been enabled to make a second Queen, and has an overwhelming force at command.

24. Rook takes Queen.24. Queen takes Rook (check).

You had no better move than to take the newly-elected Queen, for two Queens must have proved irresistible.

25. King to his Kt's 2d.25. Kt. to Queen's 3d.
26. K. Kt's Pawn to Kt's 6th.26. P. takes Pawn.
27. P. takes Pawn.27. Bishop to Q. Kt's 2d.

Here you have given another remarkable instance of lost opportunity. At your last move you might have redeemed all former disasters by checkmating your opponent in two moves. Endeavor to find out how this was to be accomplished.

28. K. R's Pawn to R's 5th.28. Knight takes King's Pawn.
29. Bishop to King's 5th.29. Kt. to K. Kt's 4th
(discovering check).

Up to Black's last move you had still the opportunity of winning the game before mentioned.

30. King to Kt's 3d.30. K's Rook to B's 6th. (ch.)
31. King to R's 4th.31. Q. to K. Bishop's 4th.

At this point you were utterly at the mercy of your antagonist, but fortunately he wanted the skill to avail himself properly of his vast superiority in force and position, or he might have won the game in half a dozen different ways.

32. Q. takes Rook.32. Q. takes Queen.
33. B. takes K. Kt's Pawn (ch.)33. King takes Bishop.

This was your last chance, and its success should serve [50]to convince you that in the most apparently hopeless situations of the game there is often a latent resource, if we will only have the patience to search it out. By taking the Bishop, Black has left your King, who is not in check, no move without going into check, and as you have neither Piece nor Pawn besides to play, you are stalemated, and the game is DRAWN.

If thoroughly acquainted with the information contained in the preceding sections, you may now proceed to the consideration of the openings; before you do this, however, it is necessary to apprise you that without a great abridgment of the notation adopted in the foregoing game, it would be impossible to compress within the limits of this work one-third of the variations which are required to be given. The following abbreviations will therefore be used throughout the remainder of our Handbook:—

K.forKing.
Q.Queen.
R.Rook.
B.Bishop.
Kt.Knight.
P.Pawn.
sq.square.
adv.adversary's.
ch.check or checking.
dis. ch.discovering check.

The word "square" is only used to distinguish the first row of squares on which the superior Pieces stand at the commencement—thus, we say, Kt. to K's 2d, and omit the word square; but if the Kt. were played to K's first square or R's first square, the move would be described not as Kt. to K's or R's first square, but "Kt. to K's or R's square."

[TABLE OF CONTENTS]

[51]

CHAPTER II.

THE KING'S KNIGHT'S OPENING

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K's Kt. to B's 3d.

Your second move gives the name to this opening, which is one of the most popular and instructive of all the various methods of commencing the game. The Kt., it will be observed, at once attacks the adverse Pawn, and the defence recommended by the best authors and the leading players of Europe, is for Black to reply 2. Q's Kt. to B's 3d. He has, however, many other ways of playing, and as the examination of these comparatively simple variations will serve to prepare you for the more complex and elaborate combinations of the best defences, it will be advisable to consider them previously. In the first place, then, Black may sustain his Pawn by playing—

1. P. to K. B's 3d.
2. K's B. to Q's 3d.
3. Q. to K. B's 3d.
4. P. to Q's 3d.

or, in the second place, he may leave it unprotected, and play—

5. K's Kt. to B's 3d.
6. K's B. to Q. B's 4th.
7. P. to K. B's 4th.
8. P. to Q's 4th.

He has thus eight different modes of play at his command, besides the move of Q's Kt. to B's 3d, in answer to your second move of K's Kt. to B's 3d. Each of these will form the subject of a separate game.

[52]

GAME THE FIRST.

The Damiano Gambit.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K's Kt. to B's 3d. 2. P. to K. B's 3d.
 3. Kt. takes K's P. 3. P. takes Kt.
 4. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.) 4. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
 5. Q. takes K's P. (ch.) 5. Q. to K's 2d.
 6. Q. takes R. 6. K's Kt. to B's 3d.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. (best.) 7. Q. takes P. (ch.)
 8. Q's B. to K's 3d. 8. Q. takes Q. B's P.
 9. Q. takes Kt. 9. Q. takes Q. Kt's P.
10. K's B. to Q. B's 4th.10. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.)
11. Q's Kt. to Q's 2d.11. Q. takes R. (ch.)
12. K. to his 2d.12. Q. takes K's R.
and you give mate in two moves.

The foregoing moves are dependent on Black's taking the Kt., which is very bad play. His proper move, under the circumstances, is 3. Q. to K's 2d, as in the following example:—

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K's Kt. to B's 3d. 2. P. to K. B's 3d.
 3. K's Kt. takes P. 3. Q. to K's 2d.
 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d. (best) 4. P. to Q's 4th.
 5. P. to Q's 3d. 5. P. takes K's P.
 6. P. takes P. 6. Q. takes P. (ch.)
 7. B. to K's 2d. 7. Q's B. to K. B's 4th.
 8. Kt. to Q's 4th. 8. Q's Kt. to B's 3d.
 9. Kt. takes B. 9. Q. takes Kt.
10. Castles.10. B. to Q's 3d.
11. B. to Q's 3d.
You have an excellent position.


GAME THE SECOND.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K's Kt. to B's 3d. 2. K's B. to Q's 3d.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. P. to Q's 4th. 4. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. P. takes K. P. 5. B. takes P.
 6. K. Kt. to his 5th. 6. Castles.
 7. P. to K. B's 4th. 7. B. to Q's 5th.
 8. P. to K's 5th. 8. Q. to K's 2d.
 9. Q. to K's 2d. 9. K. Kt. to K's sq.
10. B. to Q's 5th.10. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
11. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.11. P. to K. R's 3d.
[53]

In reply, you may now play P. to K. R's 4th, having a capital game. If, instead of 11. P. to R's 3d, he play 11. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th, you move 12. Q. to her 3d, then B. to Q's 2d, and finally castle on the Q's side. If, however, in lieu of that move, he play 11. B. to Q. R's 4th, you can move 12. B. to Q's 2d, and presently castle on the Q's side; and lastly, if he play 11. K. to R's sq., then you take your Queen to K. R's 5th, and he cannot save the game.

GAME THE THIRD.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. Q. to K. B's 3d.

It is seldom good to bring the Q. into play early in the game, unless for some decisive blow, because she is so easily assailable by the opponent's minor Pieces, and in attacking her he brings his forces into action.

3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.3. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.

Black now attacks two undefended Pawns, but he can take neither without ruinous loss to him; for suppose on your playing P. to Q's 3d, to protect the K. P., he ventures to take the K. Kt. P., you immediately take the K. B. P. with your Bishop (ch.). If he then take the Bishop with his King, you attack his Queen with your Rook, and on her retiring to R. 6th, you win her by K. Kt. to his 5th (ch.). On the other hand, you can leave the King's Pawn, and castle safely.

[54]
4. Castles.4. Q. takes K. P.
5. K. B. takes B. P. (ch.)5. K. to Q's sq.

It is quite obvious that he would lose his Queen by the check of the Knight, if he took the Bishop.

6. Kt. takes K's P.6. K. Kt. to B's 3d.

If he take the Kt., you will play R. to K's sq., compelling him either to take it with his Q. or be mated.

7. K. R. to K's sq.7. Q. to K. B's 4th.
8. K. B. to K. Kt's 6th.8. Q. to K's 3d.
9. Kt. to B's 7th. (ch.), and gains the Queen.


GAME THE FOURTH.

Philidor's Defence.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. P. to Q's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. to K. B's 4th.
 4. Q. P. takes P. 4. K. B. P. takes P.
 5. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th. 5. P. to Q's 4th.
 6. P. to K's 6th. 6. Kt. to K. R's 3d.
 7. P. to K. B's 3d. 7. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 8. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. 8. Q. to her 3d.
 9. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 9. Q. B. takes K. P.
10. K. Kt. takes B.10. Q. takes Kt.
11. Q. takes Q's P.11. Q. takes Q.
12. Kt. takes Q.12. Castles.
13. P. takes K. P.
You have a Pawn more than Black, and a better position.


FIRST VARIATION OF THIS ATTACK,
Commencing at White's 7th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. P. to Q's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. to K. B's 4th.
 4. Q. P. takes P. 4. K. B. P. takes P.
 5. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th. 5. P. to Q's 4th.
 6. P. to K's 6th. 6. Kt. to K. R's 3d.
 7. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 7. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 8. K. Kt. takes K. R. P. 8. Q. B. takes K. P. (best)
 9. Kt. takes K. B. 9. K. takes Kt.
10. Q. Kt. takes K. P.10. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th.
11. K. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th, with the better game.


[55]

SECOND VARIATION OF THIS ATTACK.
Commencing at White's 8th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. P. to Q's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. to K. B's 4th.
 4. Q. P. takes P. 4. K. B. P. takes P.
 5. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th. 5. P. to Q's 4th.
 6. P. to K's 6th. 6. Kt. to K. R's 3d.
 7. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 7. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 8. K. Kt. takes K. P. 8. P. takes Kt.
 9. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.) 9. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
10. Q. to K's 5th.10. K. R. to Kt's sq.
11. B. takes K. Kt.11. B. takes B.
12. Q. R. to Q's sq.12. Q. to K's 2d.
13. Kt. takes K. P.13. Q. B. takes P.
14. R. to Q's 6th. (the winning move.)14. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.
15. Kt. to B's 6th. (ch.)15. K. to B's sq. (best)
16. R. to Q's 8th. (ch.)16. K. to B's 2d.
17. B. to Q. B's 4th. (ch.)17. B. to K's 3d. (best)
18. Kt. takes R., and wins.


VARIATION OF THE DEFENCE IN THIS OPENING,
Beginning at Black's 3d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. P. to Q's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th. 4. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. P. takes K. P. 5. B. takes Kt.
 6. Q. takes B. 6. P. takes P.
 7. Q. to her Kt's 3d. 7. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 8. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 8. Q. to Q's 2d.
 9. B. takes Kt. 9. P. takes B.
10. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.10. K. B. to K. Kt's 2d.
11. Q. R. to Q's sq.11. Q. to K's 2d.
12. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.)12. P. to Q. B's 3d.
13. Kt. to Q's 5th, with an excellent game.


[56]

ANOTHER VARIATION OF THE DEFENCE,
Beginning also from Black's 3d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. P. to Q's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
 4. P. takes P. 4. B. takes Kt.
 5. Q. takes B. 5. P. takes P.
 6. B. to Q. B's 4th. 6. Q. to K. B's 3d.
 7. Q. to her Kt's 3d. 7. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 8. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 8. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 9. Castles. 9. B. to Q's 3d.
10. P. to K. B's 4th.10. P. takes P.
11. Q. B. takes P.11. B. takes B. (best)
12. P. to K's 5th.12. B. takes K. R. P. (ch.)
And White has the better game.


SUMMARY OF THE FOREGOING VARIATIONS
IN PHILIDOR'S DEFENCE.

The result of the preceding analysis serves to prove that Q. P. one, as the second move of Black, is not a tenable defence; since, play as he can afterwards, if the best moves are adopted by the first player, he will always have a very insecure or a very constrained game.

[57]

GAMES

ILLUSTRATIVE OF PHILIDOR'S DEFENCE.

Game I.—Mr. Morphy plays without seeing the Chess board or men, against M. Boucher, at Paris.

Go to PGN_01

 WHITE.  (Mr. M.)  BLACK.  (M. B.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to K. B's 3d. 2. P. to Q's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. takes P.
 4. Q. takes P. 4. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
 5. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. 5. Q. B. to Q's 2d.
 6. B. takes Kt. 6. B. takes B.
 7. B. to K. Kt's 5th. 7. P. to K. B's 3d.
 8. B. to K. R's 4th. 8. Kt. to K. R's 3d.
 9. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 3d. 9. K. B. to K's 2d.
10. Castles on K's side.10. Castles.
11. Q. to Q. B's 4th. (ch.)11. K. to R's sq.
12. K. Kt. to Q's 4th.12. Q. to her 2d.
13. Q. R. to Q's sq.13. K. R. to K. B's 2d.
14. P. to K. B's 4th.14. P. to Q. R's 4th.
15. P. to K. B's 5th.15. K. R. to K. B's sq.
16. K. Kt. to K's 6th.16. K. R. to K. Kt's sq.
17. P. to Q. R's 4th.17. Kt. to Kt's 5th.
18. Q. to K's 2d.18. Kt. to K's 4th.
19. B. to K. Kt's 3d.19. Q. to Q. B's sq.[A]
20. B. takes Kt.20. Q. P. takes B.
21. K. R. to K. B's 3d.[B]21. Q. B. to Q's 2d.[C]
22. K. R. to K. R's 3d.[D]22. P. to K. R's 3d.
23. Q. to Q's 2d.23. K. to R's 2d.[E]
24. Q. takes Q. B.24. B. to Q's 3d.
25. K. R. takes K. R. P. (ch.)[F]25. K. takes R.
26. R. to Q's 3d.[G]26. K. to R's 4th.
27. Q. to K. B's 7th. (ch.)
And wins; the battle having lasted about seven hours.

[A] To enable him to capture the Bishop, which is about to take the Kt., with the Q's Pawn.

[B] The attack looks already irresistible, but the actual finish is charmingly accomplished.

[C] By this move Black may be said to lose a Piece. His best course—but that a bad one—was possibly to retreat his Bishop to K's square.

[D] Threatening mate in two moves.

[E] To avert the promised mate, by R. takes Pawn, &c.

[F] The termination is very pretty—quite an elegant little problem.

[G] And Black has no possible means of escape; for, if he play Q. to K's sq., White simply captures the Queen for nothing; if B. to Q. B's 4th (ch.), then follows K. to B's sq., &c.


[58]

Game II.—Between Mr. Morphy and Mr. Harrwitz.

Go to PGN_02

 WHITE.  (Mr. M.) BLACK.  (Mr. H.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to K. B's 3d. 2. P. to Q's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. takes P.
 4. Q. takes P. 4. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
 5. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. 5. Q. B. to Q's 2d.
 6. B. takes Kt. 6. B. takes B.
 7. B. to K. Kt's 5th. 7. P. to K. B's 3d.
 8. B. to K. R's 4th. 8. Kt. to K. R's 3d.
 9. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 9. K. B. to K's 2d.
10. Castles on K's side.10. Q. to Q's 2d.
11. Q. R. to Q's sq.11. Castles on K's side.
12. Q. to B's 4th. (ch.)12. K. R. to K. B's 2d.
13. K. Kt. to Q's 4th.13. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th.
14. P. to K. R's 3d.14. Kt. to K's 4th.
15. Q. to K's 2d.15. P. to K. Kt's 4th.[A]
16. B. to K. Kt's 3d.16. K. R. to K. Kt's 2d.
17. K. Kt. to K. B's 5th.17. K. R. to K. Kt's 3d.
18. P. to K. B's 4th.18. P. takes P.
19. K. R. takes P.19. K. to R's sq.
20. K. R. to K. R's 4th.20. K. B. to his sq.
22. Q. R. to K. B's sq.22. Q. to K's 3d.
23. Q. Kt. to Q. Kt's 5th.23. Q. to K. Kt's sq.
24. Q. R. to K. B's 2d.24. P. to Q. R's 3d.
25. Q. Kt. takes Q. B. P.[B]25. Q. R. to Q. B's sq.
26. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th.26. B. takes Kt.
27. K. P. takes B.27. Q. R. to Q. B's 2d.[C]
28. P. to Q. B's 4th.28. B. to K's 2d.
29. K. R. to K. R's 5th.29. Q. to K's sq.
30. P. to Q. B's 5th.[D]30. Q. R. takes P.
31. K. R. takes P. (ch.)31. K. takes R.
32. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)32. K. to Kt. sq.
33. Kt. takes B. (ch.)33. K. to Kt's 2d.[E]
34. Kt. to K. B's 5th. (ch.)34. K. to Kt's sq.
35. Kt. takes Q. P.
And Black cannot possibly save the game.

[A] Very imprudent in such a position and against such an opponent. It must be admitted, however, that Black has no good move at this crisis.

[B] Perfectly sound, as the sequel shows.

[C] Taking the Pawn would have been injudicious; for example,

27. Q. takes Pawn.
28. K. R. takes K. R. P. (ch.)28. K. takes R. (best).
29. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)29. B. to K. R's 3d.
30. Kt. takes B.30. K. R. takes Kt.
31. Q. to K. B's 5th. (ch.)31. Anything.
32. Q. takes Q. R., &c.

[D] The first step in a combination of admirable daring and ingenuity.

[E] Had he taken the Knight it would have cost him his Queen.


[59]

Game III.—Between Mr. Morphy and Mr. Harrwitz.

Go to PGN_03

  WHITE.  (Mr. M.)  BLACK.  (Mr. H.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to K. B's 3d. 2. P. to Q's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. takes P.
 4. Q. takes P. 4. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
 5. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. 5. Q. B. to Q's 2d.
 6. B. takes Kt. 6. B. takes B.
 7. B. to K. Kt's 5th. 7. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
 8. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 3d. 8. K. B. to K's 2d.
 9. Castles on Q's side. 9. Castles.
10. K. R. to K's sq.10. P. to K. R's 3d.
11. B. to K. R's 4th.11. Kt. to K's sq.
12. B. takes B.12. Q. takes B.
13. P. to K's 5th.13. B. takes Kt.
14. P. takes B.14. Q. to K. Kt's 4th. (ch.)
15. K. to Q. Kt's sq.15. P. takes P.
16. K. R. takes P.16. Q. to K. Kt's 7th.
17. Kt. to Q's 5th.17. Q. takes K. R. P.
18. K. R. to K's sq.18. Q. to Q's 3d.
19. K. R. to K. Kt's sq.19. K. to K. R's 2d.
20. Q. to K's 3d.20. P. to K. B's 4th.
21. Kt. to K. B's 4th.21. Q. to Q. Kt's 3d.
22. Q. to K's 2d.22. K. R. to K. B's 2d.
23. Q. to Q. B's 4th.23. Q. to K. B's 3d.
24. Kt. to K. R's 5th.[A]24. Q. to K's 2d.
25. Q. R. to K's sq.25. Q. to Q's 2d.
26. P. to Q. R's 3d.26. Kt. to Q's 3d.
27. Q. to Q's 4th.27. Q. R. to K. Kt's sq.
28. K. R. to K. Kt's 2d.28. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.
29. Q. R. to K. Kt's sq.29. Kt. to K's sq.
30. Q. to Q. B's 3d.30. P. to K. B's 5th.[B]
31. Q. R. to K. R's sq.[C]31. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
32. Q. R. to K. Kt's sq.32. Q. to Q's 4th.
33. Q. to K's sq.33. P. takes Kt.
34. K. R. to Kt's 5th.[D]34. Q. takes P.
35. Q. to K's 5th.35. K. R. to K. B's 3d.
36. Q. to K's 7th. (ch.)36. Q. R. to K. Kt's 2d.
37. Q. takes Kt.37. P. takes R.
38. Q. to K's sq.38. Q. to Q. B's 3d.
39. P. to K. B's 3d.39. K. R. to K's 3d.
40. Q. to K. B's 2d.40. Q. R. to K's 2d.
And White abandoned the game.

[A] This looks promising, but does not turn out well. He had better, perhaps, have played K. R. to K. Kt's 6th.

[B] Well played. White must now beware, for his Kt. is in sore peril.

[C] This will not save the Kt. The best move was K. R. to Kt's 4th.

[D] Merely desperate.


[60]

Game IV.—Between Mr. Morphy and Mr. Bird of London.

Go to PGN_04

 WHITE.  (Mr. B.) BLACK.  (Mr. M.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. Kt. to K. B's 3d. 2. P. to Q's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. to K. B's 4th.
 4. Kt. to Q. B's 3d. 4. K. B. P. takes P.
 5. Q. Kt. takes P. 5. P. to Q's 4th.
 6. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d. 6. P. to K's 5th.
 7. Kt. to K's 5th. 7. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
 8. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th. 8. B. to Q's 3d.
 9. Kt. to K. R's 5th. 9. Castles.
10. Q. to Q's 2d.10. Q. to K's sq.
11. P. to K. Kt's 4th.11. Kt. takes K. Kt. P.
12. Kt. takes Kt.12. Q. takes Kt.
13. Kt. to K's 5th.13. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
14. B. to K's 2d.14. Q. to K. R's 6th.
15. Kt. takes Kt.15. P. takes Kt.
16. B. to K's 3d.16. R. to Q. Kt's sq.
17. Castles (Q. R.)17. R. takes K. B. P.
18. B. takes R.18. Q. to Q. R's 6th.
19. P. to Q. B's 3d.19. Q. takes Q. R. P.
20. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.20. Q. to Q. R's 8th. (ch.)
21. K. to B's 2d.21. Q. to R's 5th. (ch.)
22. K. to Kt's 2d.22. B. takes Q. Kt. P.
23. P. takes B.23. R. takes P. (ch.)
24. Q. takes R.24. Q. takes Q. (ch.)
25. K. to B's 2d.25. P. to K's 6th.
26. B. takes P.26. B. to K. B's 4th. (ch.)
27. R. to Q's 3d.27. Q. to Q. B's 5th. (ch.)
28. K. to Q's 2d.28. Q. to Q. R's 7th. (ch.)
29. K. to Q's square.29. Q. to Kt's 8th. (ch.)
And White resigns.


Game V.—(By Philidor.)

Go to PGN_05

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to K. B's 3d. 2. P. to Q's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. to K. B's 4th.
 4. P. takes K. P. 4. K. B. P. takes K. P.
 5. Kt. to Kt's 5th. 5. P. to Q's 4th.
 6. P. to K. B's 4th.[A] 6. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 7. P. to Q. B's 4th. 7. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 8. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 8. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
 9. P. to K. R's 4th. 9. P. to K. R's 3d.
10. K. Kt. to R's 3d.10. Castles.
11. Q. Kt. to Q. R's 4th.11. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.)
12. B. to Q's 2d.12. B. takes B. (ch.)
13. Q. takes B.13. P. to Q's 5th.
14. P. to Q. B's 5th.14. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.
15. P. takes P. (in passing).15. Q. R. P. takes P.
16. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.16. Q. B. to K's 3d.
17. B. to K's 2d.17. Kt. to K. B's 4th.
18. K. Kt. to his sq.18. K. Kt. to Kt's 6th.
19. K. R. to his 2d.19. P. to K's 6th.
20. Q. to her Kt's 2d.20. P. to Q's 6th.
21. B. to K. B's 3d.21. K. R. takes P.
22. Castles on Q's side.22. K. R. takes Kt.
23. P. takes K. R.23. Q. R. takes P.
24. P. to Q. R's 3d.24. R. to Q. B's 5th. (ch.)
25. K. to Q. Kt's sq.25. R. to Q. B's 7th.
26. Q. to Kt's 4th.26. Q. Kt. to R's 3d.
27. Q. to K. B's 4th.27. Q. Kt. to B's 4th.
28. Q. takes K. Kt.
And Black mates in two moves.

[A] This is not the proper move; he should play 6. P. to K's 6th.


[61]

GAME THE FIFTH.
Petroff's Defence.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
  1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. takes P.
 4. P. to K's 5th. 4. Kt. to K's 5th. (best)
 5. Kt. takes P. 5. P. to Q's 3d. (best).
 6. P. takes P. 6. K. B. takes P.
 7. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 7. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 8. Q. B. to K's 3d. 8. Castles.
 9. Castles. 9. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.
The game is equal.

Variation I.
Commencing at Black's 3d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
3. P. to Q's 4th.3. Kt. takes P.
4. K. B. to Q's 3d.4. P. to Q's 4th.
5. Kt. takes K's P.5. Kt. to Q's 3d.
6. P. to Q. B's 4th.6. P. takes P.
7. K. Kt. takes P.7. Q. B. to K's 3d.
8. Kt. to K's 3d.8. B. to K's 2d.
9. Castles.9. Castles.
You have the move, and somewhat the advantage of position.

[62]

Variation II.
Beginning at White's 5th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
3. P. to Q's 4th.3. P. takes P.
4. P. to K's 5th.4. Kt. to K's 5th.
5. K. B. to Q's 3d.5. K. Kt. to Q. B's 4th
6. Kt. takes P.6. P. to Q's 3d.
7. P. takes P.7. K. B. takes P.
8. Castles.8. Castles.

It would not be a good move for Black, instead of castling, to take your K. R. P. (ch.) and then to take the Kt., on account of your check with the B., which would leave his Q. exposed to capture.

Variation III.
Beginning at White's 3d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. Kt. takes K's P. 3. Kt. takes P.
 4. Q. to K's 2d. 4. Q. to K's 2d.
 5. Q. takes Kt. 5. P. to Q's 3d.
 6. P. to Q's 4th. 6. P. to K. B's 3d.
 7. P. to K. B's 4th. 7. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.
 8. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 8. Q. P. takes Kt.
 9. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th. 9. Q. to her 3d.
10. Q. P. takes P.10. P. takes P.
11. P. takes P.11. Q. to her B's 3d.
12. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th.12. Q. to her B's 4th.
13. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.

Winning the Q. At his 12th move, Black might prolong the game by playing 12. Q. to K. Kt's 3d, but in that [63]case you would take 13. Q. B. P. with the Kt. (ch.), then take Q. with Q., and afterwards Q. R. with Kt.

Variation IV.
Beginning at Black's 3d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
3. Kt. takes K. P.3. P. to Q's 3d.
4. Kt. to K. B's 3d.4. Kt. takes K's P.
5. P. to Q's 4th.5. P. to Q's 4th.
6. K. B. to Q's 3d.6. K. B. to K's 2d.
7. Castles.7. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
8. P. to Q. B's 4th.8. Q. B. to K's 3d.
9. P. to Q. R's 3d.9. Castles.

You are now enabled to play Q. to her B's 2d, and obtain a good attacking situation.

ANOTHER VARIATION,
Beginning at the 3d move of White.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. Kt. takes P.
 4. Q. to K's 2d. 4. P. to Q's 4th.
 5. Kt. takes K. P. 5. K. B. to Q. B. 4 (best)
 6. P. to Q's 3d. 6. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.)
 7. K. to Q's sq. (best) 7. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 8. Kt. takes K. B. P. 8. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
 9. Kt. takes Q. 9. B. takes Q. (ch.)
10. K. takes B.10. Kt. to K. B's 7th.
11. R. to K. B's sq.11. P. takes B.
12. Kt. to K's 6th.12. P. takes P. (ch.)
13. P. takes P.13. K. to his 2d.
14. Kt. takes K. Kt. P.14. R. to K. Kt's sq.
15. Kt. to K. B's 5th. (ch.)15. K. to his 3d.
16. Q. B. to K's 3d.16. B. takes B.
17. Kt. takes B.17. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th.

The positions are equal, but you have a pawn more.

[64]

Variation (A.)
Beginning at Black's 6th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. Kt. takes P.
 4. Q. to K's 2d. 4. P. to Q's 4th.
 5. Kt. takes K. P. 5. K. B. to Q. B's 4 (best)
 6. P. to Q's 3d. 6. Q. P. takes B.
 7. Q. takes Kt. 7. Castles.
 8. Q. takes doubled P. 8. Q. to K's 2d.
 9. P. to K. B's 4th. 9. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
10. Q. to K's 4th.10. K. R. to K's sq.
11. K. to Q's sq.11. Q. to K. R's 5th.
12. P. to K. Kt's 3d.12. Q. to K. R's 4th. (ch.)
13. K. to Q's 2d.13. Kt. takes Kt.
14. P. takes Kt.14. R. takes P.
Winning easily.

Instead, however, of playing 12. P. to K. Kt's 3d, you might at that moment move Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.

12. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.12. Q. to K. R's 4th. (ch.)
13. Q. Kt. to K. B's 3d. (best)13. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.

and now, play as you can, Black must gain a decided advantage by taking the K. Kt. with Kt., &c.

VARIATION,
Beginning at White's 11th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. Kt. takes P.
 4. Q. to K's 2d. 4. P. to Q's 4th.
 5. Kt. takes K. P. 5. K. B. to Q. B. 4th. (best)
 6. P. to Q's 3d. 6. Q. P. takes B.
 7. Q. takes Kt. 7. Castles.
 8. Q. takes doubled P. 8. Q. to K's 2d.
 9. P. to K. B's 4th. 9. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
10. Q. to K's 4th.10. K. R. to K's sq.
11. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.11. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
12. P. to K. Kt's 3d.12. Q. to K. R's 4th.
13. Q. Kt. to K. B's 3d.13. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.
14. Q. to K's 2d. (best)14. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
15. K. R. to B's sq.15. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th.
And Black must win.

[65]

GAMES

ILLUSTRATIVE OF PETROFF'S DEFENCE.

Game I.—Mr. Morphy plays without seeing the Chess-board or men, against M. Potier, at Paris.

Go to PGN_06

 WHITE.  (Mr. M.)  BLACK.  (M. P.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to K. B's 3d. 2. K. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. Kt. takes K. P.
 4. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 3d. 4. K. Kt. to K. B's 3d.[A]
 5. Kt. takes K. P. 5. P. to Q's 4th.
 6. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d. 6. K. B. to K's 2d.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 8. Castles. 8. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.
 9. P. to K. B's 4th. 9. Q. Kt. to Q. Kt's 3d.
10. Q. to K. B's 3d.10. P. to K. R's 4th.
11. P. to K. B's 5th.11. Q. to Q. B's 2d.
12. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.12. K. B. to Q's 3d.
13. Q. R. to K's sq.13. K. to B's sq.
14. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.14. P. to K. R's 5th.
15. K. Kt. to Kt's 6th. (ch.)[B]15. K. to Kt's sq.
16. Q. B. takes B.16. P. takes Q.
17. Q. B. takes Q.17. P. takes Kt.
18. K. B. P. takes P.18. P. takes K. R. P. (ch.)
19. K. to R's sq.19. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
20. Q. R. to K's 7th.20. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.
21. Q. B. to K's 5th.21. K. to B's sq.
22. Q. R. to K. B's 7th. (ch.)[C]22. K. to Kt's sq.
23. Kt. takes Q. P.23. P. takes Kt.
24. K. B. takes P.24. Q. Kt. to Q. Kt's 3d.
25. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
And Black abandons the game.

[A] It is to be regretted that Mr. Potier did not take the Kt. rather than retreat, as many amateurs would have been pleased to see Mr. Morphy carrying out the attack of this interesting and comparatively novel dÚbut.

[B] Finely played.

[C] The termination of this partie is remarkably elegant and finished.


[66]

Game II.—Skilfully conducted Partie played in 1837, by M. Petroff,
against three Russian Amateurs in council together.

Go to PGN_07

 WHITE.  (M. Petroff.)  BLACK.  (Amateurs.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to K. B's 3d. 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. Kt. takes K. P.
 4. K. B. to Q's 3d. 4. P. to Q's 4th.
 5. Kt. takes K. P. 5. K. B. to Q's 3d.
 6. Castles. 6. Castles.
 7. P. to Q. B's 4th. 7. P. to K. B's 4th.
 8. P. to K. B's 4th. 8. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 9. Q. B. to K's 3d. 9. Q. B. to K's 3d.
10. P. takes Q. P.10. P. takes P.
11. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.11. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
12. Q. R. to Q. B's sq.12. K. R. to B's 3d.[A]
13. B. takes Kt.13. K. B. P. takes B.
14. Q. Kt. to his 5th.14. Kt. to K's 2d.
15. Kt. takes B.15. Q. takes Kt
16. P. to K. Kt's 4th.16. P. to K. Kt's 3d.[B]
17. P. to K. B's 5th.[C]17. P. takes P.
18. B. to K. Kt's 5th.18. K. R. to B's sq.
19. B. to K. R's 6th.19. K. R. to Q. B's sq.[D]
20. Q. to her 2d.20. Q. to her square.
21. R. takes R.21. R. takes R.
22. P. takes P.22. Kt. takes P.
23. Q. to K. Kt's 2d. (ch.)23. K. to R's sq.
24. R. takes Kt.24. Q. to K. Kt's sq.
25. R. to B's 6th.25. B. to K. R's 6th.
26. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.26. Q. takes Q.
27. P. takes Q.
On this move, the Amateurs abandoned the game.

[A] This unfortunate counter attack is admirably taken advantage of by M. Petroff.

[B] They do not appear to have had a better move.

[C] Well played.

[D] It would have been better to leave the Rook en prise, and advance the Pawn to King's Bishop's 5th.


[67]

Game III.—Between M. Tchigorin and H. N. Pillsbury.

Go to PGN_08

 WHITE.  (Mr. T.)  BLACK.  (Mr. P.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. B. to Kt's 5th. 4. B. to Kt's 5th.
 5. Castles. 5. Castles.
 6. P. to Q's 3d. 6. P. to Q's 3d.
 7. B. to Kt's 5th.[A] 7. B. takes Kt.
 8. P. takes B. 8. Kt. to K's 2d.[B]
 9. B. takes Kt. 9. P. takes B.
10. Q. to Q's 2d.10. Kt. to Kt's 3d.
11. K. to R's sq.[C]11. K. to R's sq.
12. P. to Q's 4th.12. R. to K. Kt's sq.
13. B. to Q's 3d.13. Q. to K's 2d.
14. Q. R. to Kt's sq.[D]14. P. to Kt's 3d.
15. Kt. to Kt's sq.15. B. to K's 3d.!
16. P. to Q's 5th.?16. B. to Q's 2d.
17. P. to Kt's 3d.17. R. to Kt's 2d.
18. Q. R. to K's sq.18. Q. R. to K. Kt's sq.[E]
19. P. to B's 3d.[F]19. P. to K. R's 4th.!
20. R. to K's 2d.20. Kt. to B's sq.
21. P. to K. B's 4th.21. P. takes P.
22. Q. takes P.22. Kt. to R's 2d.
23. Kt. to B's 3d.23. B. to Kt's 5th.
24. Kt. to Q's 4th.[G]24. P. to R's 5th.!
25. R. to K's 3d.25. Q. to K's 4th.
26. P. takes P.?26. B. to B's 6th. (ch.)
27. Resigns.

[A] Notes by Jas. Mason.—In this familiar "double Lopez" predicament, 7. B. takes Kt. is highly recommended, if a dull but durable kind of game is desired.

[B] ... Something like a leap in the dark. If the doubled Pawn can be "dissolved" betimes, or the open file well used in attack, a safe landing may be confidently expected.

[C] More or less necessary, sooner or later. Black does not attempt to dissolve, just here; for then Q. to R's 6th, threatening Kt. to Kt's 5th, might be uncomfortable.

[D] Routine—indirectly including the questionable 16. P. to Q's 5th ? At once Kt. to Kt's sq., to be speedily followed by P. to Kt's 3d and P. to K. B's 4th, would have given the matter another and perhaps very different complexion.

[E] ... The difference is in favor of the young American representative, who presses it fully.

[F] Manifestly weakening. The Russian champion feels himself on the defensive, and at a loss how to continue. Thus the text move may be as good as any other.

[G] 24. Kt. to R's 4th would be much stronger, the importance of halting the advancing Rook Pawn duly considered. Going from bad to worse, the downright blunder two moves later caps the climax—and more need not be said.


[68]

GAME THE SIXTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
3. Kt. takes K. P.3. Q. to K's 2d.
4. P. to Q's 4th.4. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
5. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.5. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
6. B takes B. P. (ch.)6. K. to B's sq.
7. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.7. Kt. takes K's P
8. Castles,
And you have an excellent position.


GAME THE SEVENTH.
Counter Gambit in the Knight's Opening.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. P. to K. B's 4th.
This second move of Black gives the name
of Counter Gambit to this game.
 3. K. Kt. takes P. (best.) 3. Q. to K. B's 3d. (best.)
 4. P. to Q's 4th. 4. P. to Q's 3d.
 5. Kt. to Q. B's 4th. 5. P. takes K's P.
 6. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 6. P. to Q. B's 3d.
or First Variation.
 7. Q. Kt. takes K's P. (best.) 7. Q. to K's 3d.
 8. Q. to K's 2d. 8. P. to Q's 4th.
 9. Q's Kt. to Q's 6th. (ch.) 9. K. to Q's 2d.
10. Q. Kt. to K. B's 7th.10. Q. P. takes K's Kt.
11. Q. takes Q. (ch.)11. K. takes Q.
12. K. B. takes P. (ch.)12. K. to his 2d.
13. Kt. takes R.13. Q. B. to K's 3d.
14. K. B. to Q's 3d.14. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
15. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.15. Q. B. to K. Kt's sq.
16. Castles, with a fine game.


[69]

First Variation,
Beginning at Black's 6th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. P. to K. B's 4th.
 3. K. Kt. takes P. (best) 3. Q. to K. B's 3d. (best)
 4. P. to Q's 4th. 4. P. to Q's 3d.
 5. Kt. to Q. B's 4th. 5. P. takes K. P.
 6. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 6. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.
 7. P. to K. Kt's 4th. 7. Q. B. to K. Kt's 3d.
 8. K. B. to Kt's 2d. 8. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 9. B. takes K's P. 9. B. takes B.
10. Q. Kt. takes B.10. Q. to K's 3d.
11. Q. to K's 2d.11. P. to Q's 4th.
12. K. Kt. to Q's 6th. (ch.)

If now Black take the Knight with his Bishop, you retake with the Q. Kt. (ch.), then exchange Queens, and win the Q. Kt. P. He may, however, move 12. K. to his 2d, whereupon you check with K. Kt. at K. B's 5th, and afterwards liberate your other Kt.

Second Variation,
Beginning at Black's 6th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. P. to K. B's 4th.
3. K. Kt. takes P. (best)3. Q. to K. B's 3d. (best)
4. P. to Q's 4th.4. P. to Q's 3d.
5. Kt. to Q. B's 4th.5. P. takes K. P.
6. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.6. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
7. P. to Q's 5th.7. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.
8. Q. to her 4th.8. Q. B. to K. B's 4th
9. Q. Kt. to his 5th, gaining a Pawn.


Third Variation,
From Black's 6th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. P. to K. B's 4th.
 3. K. Kt. takes P. (best) 3. Q. to K. B's 3d. (best)
 4. P. to Q's 4th. 4. P. to Q's 3d.
 5. Kt. to Q. B's 4th. 5. P. takes K's P.
 6. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 6. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.
 7. P. to K. B's 3d. (best) 7. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 8. P. takes K's P. 8. Kt. takes P.
 9. Q. to K's 2d. 9. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.
10. K. Kt. to Q's 2d.10. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
11. K. Kt. takes Kt.11. Kt. takes Q. P.
12. Q. to her 3d, having won a Piece.


[70]

Fourth Variation of this Game,
Beginning at Black's 4th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. P. to K. B's 4th.
 3. Kt. takes K. P. 3. Q. to K. B's 3d.
 4. P. to Q's 4th. 4. P. takes K. P.
 5. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 5. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 6. B. to B's 7th. (ch.) 6. K. to his 2d.
 7. P. to K. R's 4th. 7. P. to K. R's 3d.
 8. Q. to K. R's 5th. 8. K. to Q's 3d.
 9. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th. 9. P. takes B.
10. Q. takes R., and you have an easy game.


Another Variation,
Beginning at the 3d move of White.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. P. to K. B's 4th.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. P. takes K's P.
 4. Kt. takes P. 4. Q. to K. Kt's 4th.
 5. Kt. to K. B's 7th. (best) 5. Q. takes K. Kt. P.
 6. R. to K. B's sq. 6. P. to Q's 4th.
 7. Kt. takes R. 7. P. takes B.
 8. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.) 8. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
 9. Q. takes K. R. P. 9. Q. B. to K's 3d.
10. Q. takes K. Kt. P. (ch.)10. Q. takes Q.
11. Kt. takes Q.,
and you have "the exchange" and a Pawn advantage.


[71]

Variation of this Game,
Beginning at White's 3d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. P. to K. B's 4th.
 3. P. takes P. 3. P. to Q's 3d.
 4. P. to Q's 4th. 4. P. to K's 5th.
 5. Kt. to his 5th. 5. Q. B. takes P.
 6. Q. to K's 2d. 6. P. to Q's 4th.
 7. Q. to her Kt's 5th. (ch.) 7. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 8. Q. takes Q. Kt. P. 8. Q. Kt. takes Q. P.
 9. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.) 9. Kt. takes B.
10. Q. takes Kt. (ch.)10. Q. to her 2d.
11. Q. to Q. Kt's 7th.11. Q. R. to B's sq.
12. Q. takes Q. R. P.12. P. to K. R's 3d.
13. Kt. to K. R's 3d.13. B. takes Kt.
14. K. Kt. P. takes B.14. Q. takes P.
And he has the superiority in position.


GAME THE EIGHTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. P. to Q's 4th.
 3. P. takes P. (best) 3. Q. takes P.
 4. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 4. Q. to K's 3d.
 5. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.) 5. B. to Q's 2d.
 6. Castles. 6. B. takes B.
 7. Kt. takes B. 7. K. B. to Q's 3d.
 8. R. to K's sq. 8. P. to K. B's 3d.
 9. P. to Q's 4th. 9. P. to Q. B's 3d.
10. Q. P. takes P.10. P. takes P.
11. K. Kt. takes P.
Winning of course.


[72]

Variation.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. P. to Q's 4th.
3. Kt. takes K's P.3. Q. to K's 2d. (best).
4. P. to Q's 4th.4. P. to K. B's 3d.
5. Kt. to his 4th.5. B. takes Kt.
6. Q. takes B.6. Q. takes P. (ch.)
7. Q. takes Q. (ch.)7. P. takes Q.
There is no advantage on either side.


GAMES

ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE PRECEDING VARIATIONS.

Game I.—Between Messrs. Cochrane and Staunton.

Go to PGN_09

 WHITE.  (Mr. C.)  BLACK.  (Mr. S.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. P. to Q's 4th.
 3. Kt. takes K. P. 3. Q. to K's 2d.
 4. P. to Q's 4th. 4. P. to K. B's 3d.
 5. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. P. takes K. Kt.
 6. Kt. takes Q. P. 6. Q. to K. B's 2d.
 7. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 7. Q. B. to K's 3d.
 8. Castles. 8. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 9. P. to K. B's 4th. 9. P. takes Kt.
10. B. P. takes P.10. Q. to her 2d.
11. K. P. takes P.11. B. takes P.
12. P. to K's 6th.12. Q. to her B's 3d.
13. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)13. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
14. Q. takes B.14. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
15. Q. to K's 5th.15. Q. takes B.
16. Q. takes R.16. Kt. to K. B's 4th.
17. Q. B. to K. R's 6th.17. Q. to her Kt's 5th.
18. Q. takes B. (ch.)18. Q. takes Q.
19. B. takes Q.19. K. takes B.
20. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
Black surrenders.


[73]

Game II.—Between MM. Jaenisch and Petroff.

Go to PGN_10

 WHITE.  (Mr. J.)  BLACK.  (M. P.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. P. to Q's 4th.
 3. K. Kt. takes P. 3. Q. to K's 2d.
 4. P. to Q's 4th. 4. P. to K. B's 3d.
 5. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. P. takes P.
 6. K. Kt. to Q's 2d. 6. P. to K. B's 4th.
 7. K. B. to K's 2d. 7. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 8. K. Kt. to Q. Kt's 3d. 8. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 9. Castles. 9. Q. to K. B's 2d.
10. P. to Q. B's 4th.10. Q. B. to Q's 2d.
11. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.11. Castles.
12. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.12. P. to K. R's 3d.
13. P. to Q. R's 3d.13. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
14. Q. B. to Q's 2d.14. P. to K. B's 5th.
15. P. to Q's 5th.15. Q. Kt. to K's 4th.
16. K. Kt. to Q's 4th.16. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
17. Q. B. to K's square.17. K. R. to Kt's sq.
18. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.18. K. B. to K's 2d.
19. P. to K. B's 3d.19. P. to K's 6th.
20. Q. to her Kt's 3d.20. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
21. P. to Q. B's 5th.21. P. takes K. B. P.
22. Kt. takes P.22. Kt. takes Kt. (ch.)
23. B. takes Kt.23. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th.
24. Q. to her B's 4th.24. K. to Kt's sq.
25. Q. to K's 4th.25. Q. R. to K's sq.
26. P. to Q's 6th.26. Q. B. to his 3d.
27. Q. to her 4th.27. B. takes B.
28. R. takes B.28. B. to K. Kt's 4th.
29. Q. Kt. to his 5th.29. P. to Q. B's 3d.
30. P. to Q's 7th.30. Q. R. to K's 3d.
31. B. to K. Kt's 3d.31. P. takes Q. Kt.[A]
32. B. takes B. P. (ch.)32. Kt. to K's 4th.
33. B. takes Kt. (ch.)33. R. takes B.
34. Q. takes R. (ch.)34. K. to R's sq.
35. R. takes Q.35. P. to K's 7th.
36. Q. to K's 8th. (ch.)36. R. takes Q.
37. P. takes R., becomes a Queen (ch.), and wins.

[A] If Black had taken the B. with K. B. P. at this point, the following moves show that he would have equally lost:—

31. P. takes B.
32. Q. takes Kt.32. P. takes P. (ch.)
33. K. to R's sq.33. Q. takes Q. P.
34. Q. to K. Kt's 3d. (ch.), and wins.


[74]

GAME THE NINTH.
The Giuoco Piano.

An attentive examination of the eight separate methods of reply to your second move of K's Kt. to B's 3d in the antecedent games, will have enabled you to understand that four at least of these defences, viz.: P. to K. B's 3d, B. to Q's 3d, Q. to B's 3d, and B. to Q. B's 4th, are untenable and injurious for the game of the second player, and that the remaining four, if not absolutely bad for him, are unsatisfactory, because against the best attack, they leave the balance of advantage in favor of the party playing first.

It is now time to consider the consequences to both parties when Black, abandoning the objectionable or uncertain modes of play he has hitherto adopted, shall answer with the move which the best authorities at length concur in recommending as the proper one, i.e. 2. Q's Kt. to B's 3d. Upon his playing thus, you have the choice of three good moves: in the first place to play 3. K's B. to Q. B's 4th, as in the present game; secondly, 3. P. to Q's 4th; and thirdly, P. to Q. B's 3d. The two latter of which will form the subjects of games hereafter.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th

It is generally admitted that Black's third move is the best he can adopt; and the opening now formed is that which the Italians have entitled the "Giuoco Piano;" an opening, less attacking than many others, but one perfectly safe for both players, and therefore always in request, and which usually generates games of the most solid and instructive kind.

 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d. (best)
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. P. takes P.
 6. P. to K's 5th. 6. P. to Q's 4th. (best)
 7. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. 7. K. Kt. to K's 5th.
 8. B. takes Kt. (ch.) 8. P. takes B.
 9. P. takes P. 9. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
10. Castles.10. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
11. Q. B. to K's 3d.11. Castles.
The game is equal.


[75]

Variation I.
Beginning at Black's 6th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. P. takes P.
 6. P. to K's 5th. 6. K. Kt. to K's 5th.
 7. K. B. to Q's 5th. 7. Kt. takes K. B's P.
 8. K. takes Kt. 8. P. takes P. (dis. ch.)
 9. K. to Kt's 3d. 9. P. takes Q. Kt's P.
10. Q. B. takes P.10. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.
11. Q. to her B's 2d.11. P. to Q's 3d.
12. B. to K's 4th.12. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d.
13. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.13. P. to Q. B's 3d.
14. Q. R. to Q's sq.
And the game appears to me in your favor.

Remember that at your move 14. you must not, instead of playing Q. R. to Q's sq., take the Kt. with your B., and afterwards play 15. Q. Kt. to K's 4th, because after taking your B. with K. R's P., he might move Q. B. to K. B's 4th, and thus prevent you moving your Kt. advantageously.

Variation II.
Beginning at White's 6th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. P. takes P.
 6. P. takes P. 6. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.)
 7. B. to Q's 2d. 7. B. takes B. (ch.)
 8. Q. Kt. takes B. 8. P. to Q's 4th.
 9. P. takes P. 9. Kt. takes P.
10. Q. to her Kt's 3d.10. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.
The game is even.


[76]

Variation III.
Beginning at White's 5th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. Castles. 5. Kt. takes K's P.
 6. Q. to K's 2d. 6. P. to Q's 4th.
 7. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. 7. Castles.
 8. B. takes Q. Kt. 8. P. takes B.
 9. Kt. takes K. P. 9. Q. B. to Kt's 2d.
10. P. to Q's 4th.10. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
There is no advantage on either side.


GAME THE TENTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. Q's Kt. to B's 3d.
3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
4. P. to Q. B's 3d.4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
5. P. to Q's 3d.5. P. to Q's 3d.
6. P. to Q's 4th.6. P. takes P.
7. P. takes P.7. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
8. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.8. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th
9. P. to Q's 5th.9. Q. Kt. to K's 4th.
The game is equal.


GAME THE ELEVENTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. P. to Q's 3d.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. P. takes P.
 6. P. takes P. 6. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.)
 7. B. to Q's 2d. 7. B. takes B. (ch.)
 8. Q. Kt. takes B. 8. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 9. Q. to her Kt's 3d. 9. Castles.
10. Castles.10. Q. Kt. to R's 4th.
11. Q. to her B's 2d.11. Kt. takes B.
12. Q. takes Kt.12. Kt. takes K's P.
13. Kt. takes Kt.13. P. to Q's 4th.
14. Q. to K's 2d.14. P. takes Kt.
15. Q. takes P.
[77]

There is little difference in the positions, but your men are better disposed for immediate action, and you have the advantage of a Knight against a Bishop.

Variation I.
Beginning at White's 7th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. P. to Q's 3d.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. P. takes P.
 6. P. takes P. 6. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.)
 7. K. to his B's sq. 7. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
 8. Q. to her R's 4th. 8. B. takes Kt.
 9. P. takes B. 9. Q. to her 2d.
10. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th.10. Castles.
11. K. to Kt's 2d.

And it appears to me that White has an unquestionable advantage.


GAME THE TWELFTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. P. to K. B's 4th.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. K. B. P. takes K. P.
 6. K. Kt. takes K. P. 6. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 7. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.) 7. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
 8. B. to K. B's 7th. (ch.) 8. K. to B's sq.
 9. Q. B. to K. R's 6th. (ch.) 9. Kt. takes B.
10. Q. takes Kt. (ch.)10. K. to his 2d.
11. B. takes Kt's P.11. Kt. takes Kt.
12. Q. to K. Kt's 5th. (ch.), and you must win.


[78]

GAME THE THIRTEENTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
4. P. to Q. B's 3d.4. Q. to K's 2d.
5. P. to Q's 4th.5. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
6. P. takes K. P.6. Kt. takes P.
7. Kt. takes Kt.7. Q. takes Kt.
8. Castles.8. P. to Q's 3d.
9. K. to R's sq.9. Q's B. to K's 3d.
White has a little the better game.

Variation.

1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
4. P. to Q. B's 3d.4. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d
5. P. to Q's 4th.5. P. to Q's 3d.
6. P. takes P.6. P. takes P.
7. Q. takes Q. (ch.)7. K. takes Q.
8. B. takes K. B's P.,
and you have the better game.


GAME THE FOURTEENTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K's Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K's B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K's B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. Castles. 4. P. to Q's 3d.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. Q's B. to K. Kt's 5th.
 6. Q. to her Kt's 3d. 6. Q's B. takes Kt.
 7. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.) 7. K. to K. B's sq.
 8. K. Kt. P. takes Q. B. 8. Q. to K. B's 3d.
 9. K. B. to K. R's 5th. 9. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
10. K. B. to Kt's 4th.10. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
11. Q. to her sq.
You have the better game.


[79]

GAME THE FIFTEENTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q's 3d. 4. P. to Q's 3d.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. Q. to K. B's 3d.
 6. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th. 6. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.
 7. Castles. 7. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
 8. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d. 8. K. Kt. to K. R's 3d.
 9. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 9. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
10. P. to Q. R's 4th.10. P. to Q. R's 4th. (best)
11. P. to Q. Kt's 5th.11. Kt. to Q's sq.
12. K. B. to Q's 5th.
The game is in your favor.


GAMES

ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE GIUOCO PIANO.

Game I.—Between Mr. D. Harrwitz of Paris and
Mr. Capdebo, a strong Hungarian player.

Go to PGN_11

 WHITE.  (Mr. C.)  BLACK.  (Mr. H.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. K. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. P. takes P.
 6. P. takes P. 6. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.)
 7. Q. B. to Q's 2d. 7. K. B. takes Q. B. (ch.)
 8. Q. Kt. takes B. 8. P. to Q's 4th.
 9. P. takes P. 9. K. Kt. takes P.
10. Q. to K's 2d. (ch.)10. B. to K's 3d.
11. B. to Kt's 5th.11. Castles.
12. B. takes Kt.12. P. takes B.
13. Castles (with K. R.)13. Q. R. to Kt's sq.
14. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.14. Kt. to K. B's 5th.
15. Q. to Q. R's 6th.15. K. R. to K's sq.
16. K. R. to K's sq.16. Q. to Q's 2d.
17. Kt. to K's 5th.17. Q. takes P.
18. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.18. Q. to Q. Kt's 3d.
19. Q. takes Q.19. R. takes Q.
20. Q. R. to B's sq.20. P. to K. B's 3d.
21. K. Kt. to Q. B's 4th.21. Q. R. to R's 3d.
And Black ultimately won.


[80]

Game II.—Played at the Philadelphia AthenŠum,
between Mr. McCabe and Mr. H. P. Montgomery.

Go to PGN_12

 WHITE.  (Mr. McC.)  BLACK.  (Mr. M.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. Kt. to K. B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. P. to K. B's 4th.
 5. P. to Q's 3d. 5. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 6. P. takes P. 6. P. to Q's 4th.
 7. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. 7. Q. to her 3d.
 8. Castles. 8. Castles.
 9. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 9. B. to Kt's 3d.
10. P. to K. R's 3d.10. Q. B. takes P.
11. B. takes Kt.11. P. takes B.
12. P. to Q's 4th.12. P. to K's 5th.
13. Kt. to K's 5th.13. P. to Q. R's 4th.
14. Q. B. to R's 3d.14. P. takes P.
15. B. takes P.15. P. to Q. B's 4th.
16. P. takes P.16. B. takes P.
17. B. takes B.17. Q. takes B.
18. Q. to Q's 4th.18. Q. to Q's 3d.
19. Kt. to K. Kt's 4th.19. B. takes Kt.
20. P. takes B.20. Kt. takes P.
21. P. to K. Kt's 3d.21. Q. to K. R's 3d.
22. R. to Q's sq.22. Q. checks.
23. K. moves.23. R. takes P. (ch.), and wins.


[81]

Game III.—Between Mr. Horwitz and Mr. Staunton.

Go to PGN_13

 WHITE.  (Mr. S.)  BLACK.  (Mr. H.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. P. to Q's 3d.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. P. takes P.
 6. P. takes P. 6. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 7. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 7. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
 8. Q. B. to K's 3d. 8. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 9. P. to Q. R's 3d. 9. Castles.
10. K. B. to K's 2d.10. K. R. to K's sq.
11. P. to Q's 5th.11. Q. Kt. to K's 4th.
12. Kt. takes Kt.12. Q. B. takes K. B.
13. Q. takes B.13. R. takes Kt.
14. B. takes K. B.14. Q. R. P. takes B.
15. Castles on K's side.15. Kt. takes K. P.
16. Kt. takes Kt.16. P. to K. B's 4th.
17. P. to K. B's 3d.17. P. takes Kt.
18. P. takes P.18. Q. to K's 2d.
19. Q. R. to K's sq.19. Q. R. to K's sq.
20. K. R. to K. B's 4th.20. P. to K. R's 3d.[A]
21. Q. to K. B's 3d.[B]21. R. takes Q. P.
22. Q. R. to K. B's sq.[C]22. R. to K's 4th.
23. K. R. to K. B's 7th.23. Q. to K's 3d.[D]
24. K. R. takes Q. B. P.24. R. takes K. P.
25. R. takes Q. Kt. P.25. P. to Q's 4th.
26. P. to K. R's 3d.[E]26. R. to K's 8th.
27. R. takes R.27. Q. takes R. (ch.)
28. Q. to K. B's sq.[F]28. Q. to K's 6th. (ch.)
29. Q. to K. B's 2d.29. Q. to her B's 8th. (ch.)
30. K. to R's 2d.30. R. to K. B's sq.
31. Q. to her 4th.31. R. to K. B's 3d.[G]
32. Q. takes P. (ch.)32. K. to R's 2d.
33. Q. to K's 5th.33. R. to K. Kt's 3d.[H]
34. R. to K's 7th.34. Q. to her 7th.
35. Q. to K's 4th.35. Q. to her 3d. (ch.)
36. R. to K's 5th.36. K. to Kt's sq.
37. Q. to her 5th. (ch.)37. Q. takes Q.
38. R. takes Q.38. K. to B's 2d.
39. R. to Q. Kt's 5th.39. K. to his 2d.
40. P. to K. Kt's 4th.40. K. to Q's 2d.
41. K. to Kt's 3d.41. K. to Q. B's 3d.
42. R. to K's 5th.42. R. to Q's 3d.
43. R. to K's 3d.43. K. to Q. B's 4th.
44. P. to K. R's 4th.44. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
45. K. to B's 4th.45. K. to Q's 5th.
46. R. to K's 4th. (ch.)46. K. to Q's 4th.
47. R. to K's 8th.47. R. to K. B's 3d. (ch.)
48. K. to his 3d.48. K. to Q. B's 5th.
49. R. to K's 4th. (ch.)49. K. to Q's 4th.
50. R. to K. B's 4th.50. R. to Q. B's 3d.
51. R. to Q. Kt's 4th.51. R. to K's 3d. (ch.)
52. K. to Q's 3d.52. R. to K. B's 3d.
53. R. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.)[I]53. K. to Q. B's 3d.
54. R. to K's 5th.54. K. to Q's 3d.
55. R. to Q. Kt's 5th.55. K. to Q. B's 3d.
56. R. to Q. Kt's 4th.56. R. to B's 6th. (ch.)
57. K. to his 2d.57. R. to K. R's 6th.
58. R. to K. B's 4th.58. R. takes K. R. P.
59. R. to B's 6th. (ch.)59. K. to Kt's 4th.
60. R. takes K. Kt. P.60. R. to R's 7th. (ch.)
61. K. to B's 3d.61. R. takes Q. Kt. P.
62. R. takes K. R. P.62. R. to Q. Kt's 6th. (ch.)
63. K. to B's 4th.63. R. takes Q. R. P.
64. P. to Kt's 5th.64. R. to Q. R's 8th.
65. R. to K. R's 4th.65. K. to Q. B's 4th.
66. P. to Kt's 6th.66. R. to Q. R's 2d.
67. K. to his B's 5th.67. P. to Kt's 4th.
68. R. to K. Kt's 4th.68. P. to Kt's 5th.[J]
69. P. to Kt's 7th.69. R. takes P.
70. R. takes R.70. P. to Kt's 6th.
71. K. to his 4th.71. K. to Kt's 5th.
72. K. to Q's 3d.
And Black surrenders.

[82]

[A] Black would have gained no advantage by taking the Q. P. at this juncture, or by advancing his P. to K. Kt's 4th, to attack the Rook. The move in the text was not made without due deliberation, and we believe it the best on the board.

[B] White designedly gives up the Queen's Pawn, to get a counter attack with his combined forces.

[C] Queen to her Knight's 3d would have been worse than useless.

[D] Had he gone to Queen's square, to protect his threatened Pawn, White would have won the King's Knight's Pawn. (e.g.)

WHITE.  BLACK.
23. Q to Q's sq.
24. R. takes K. Kt. P. (ch.)24. K. takes R.
25. Q. to K. B's 7th. (ch.)25. K. to R's sq.
26. K. R. to K. B's 6th.26. R. to K. R's 4th.
27. Q. takes K. R.27. Q. takes R.
28. Q. takes R. (ch.), &c.

[E] A most important move. Black dare not now advance his Q. P. on account of Q. to B's 7th (ch.), which would enable White to double his Rooks on the adversary's K. Kt. P., and thus win easily.

[F] K. to R's 2d would have been very bad play, because Black would have checked with his Q. at K's 4th; and if then the Queen were interposed, he would have taken the Q. and played R. to K's 6th (ch.), and afterwards R. to Q. Kt's 6th.

[G] He could not save all the Pawns attacked.

[H] Threatening to take the K. Kt. P. with his Rook, and then check with the Queen at her Bishop's 3d.

[I] K. to his 3d would have been better.

[J] This was ill-judged. He should have played R. to K. Kt's 2d, or Q. R's square.


[83]

Game IV.—Between Mr. Horwitz and Mr. Staunton.

Go to PGN_14

 WHITE.  (Mr. H.)  BLACK.  (Mr. S.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to K. B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. P. to Q's 3d. 5. P. to Q's 3d.
 6. K. Kt. to his 5th. 6. Castles.
 7. P. to K. B's 4th. 7. P. to Q's 4th.
 8. P. takes Q. P. 8. K. Kt. takes P.
 9. B. takes Kt. 9. Q. takes B.
10. Q. to K. B's 3d.10. K. R. to Q's sq.[A]
11. Q. takes Q.11. R. takes Q.
12. K. to his 2d.[B]12. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th. (ch.)
13. K. Kt. to B's 3d.13. Q. R. to Q's sq.
14. P. to Q's 4th.[C]14. P. takes Q. P.
15. P. to Q. B's 4th.15. Q. R. to K's sq. (ch.)
16. K. to B's 2d.[D]16. K. R. to Q's 2d.
17. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.17. P. to Q's 6th. (dis. ch.)
18. K. to his Kt's 3d.18. Q. B. takes Kt.
19. Kt. takes B.19. Q. R. to K's 7th.
20. B. to Q's 2d.20. K. R. to Q's 3d.
21. Q. R. to Q's sq.21. K. R. to K. Kt's 3d. (ch.)
22. K. to R's 3d.[E]22. K. R. to his 3d. (ch.)
23. Kt. to K. R's 4th.23. B. to K's 2d.
24. P. to K. Kt's 3d.24. Kt. to Q's 5th.
25. B. to Q. B's 3d.25. Kt. to K's 3d.[F]
26. K. to his Kt's 4th.26. B. takes Kt.
27. P. takes B.27. Q. R. to K's 5th.
28. K. R. to K. B's sq.28. K. R. to Kt's 3d. (ch.)
29. K. to B's 5th.29. Q. R. to K's 6th.
30. P. to K. R's 5th.30. K. R. to Kt's 7th.
31. P. to K. R's 4th.31. Kt. to Q. B's 4th.
32. K. R. to K's sq.32. P. to K. Kt's 3d. (ch.)
And then Black mates in two moves.

[A] From this point we look upon the game as virtually lost for White.

[B] Probably his best move. Had he played P. to Q. Kt's 4th, Black might have taken it with his Kt., and upon the B. P. retaking, have moved K. B. to Q's 5th, winning the exchange.

[C] As good a move, perhaps, as he had on the board. By playing K. R. to Q's sq., he would evidently have lost a Piece.

[D] Well conceived. Tempting Black to open the discovered check, which would cost him "the exchange."

[E] Interposing the Kt. and then pushing the K. B. P. on the Rook afterwards, would have been unwise, on account of B. to Q's 3d. (ch.), &c.

[F] Threatening, if White took the Q. P., to win a Piece.



[84]

Game V.—Between M. St. Amant and Mr. Staunton.

Go to PGN_15

 WHITE.  (Mr. S.)  BLACK.  (M. St. A.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. Q. to K's 2d.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. P. takes P.[A]
 6. Castles. 6. Q. Kt. to K's 4th.
 7. Kt. takes Kt. 7. Q. takes Kt.
 8. P. to K. B's 4th. 8. P. takes Q. B. P. (dis. ch.)
 9. K. to R's sq. 9. Q. to her 5th.
10. Q. to her Kt's 3d.10. Kt. to K. R's 3d.
11. Q. Kt. takes P.11. Castles.
12. P. to K. R's 3d.[B]12. P. to Q. B's 3d.
13. P. to K. B's 5th.13. Q. to K. B's 3d.
14. P. to K's 5th.[C]14. Q. to K. R's 5th.
15. Q. B. takes Kt.15. Q. takes Q. B.
16. Kt. to K's 4th.16. B. to Q's 5th.
17. Kt. to Q's 6th.17. Q. to K. R's 4th.
18. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.)18. R. takes B.
19. P. to K. Kt's 4th.19. B. takes K. P.[D]
20. Q. R. to K's sq.20. Q. takes K. R. P. (ch.)
21. Q. takes Q.21. B. takes Kt.
22. R. to K's 8th. (ch.)22. B. to his sq.
23. K. R. to K's sq.23. P. to Q's 4th.
24. Q. R. to Q's 8th.24. R. to Q's 2d.
25. K. R. to K's 8th.25. R. takes Q. R.
26. R. takes R.26. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.
27. Q. to K's 3d.27. Q. B. to Kt's 2d.
28. R. takes R.28. B. takes R.
29. Q. to K's 6th. (ch.)29. K. to R's sq.
30. Q. to K. B's 7th.
Black resigns.

[A] The proper move is B. to Q. Kt's 3d. Taking the Pawn gives an immediate advantage to White.

[B] If White play P. to K. B's 5th at this point, his opponent may move Kt. to K. Kt's 5th, threatening to play afterwards Q. to K. Kt's 8th (ch.), and then mate with his Kt. at B's 7th.

[C] From this move the attack is very lively and interesting.

[D] There appears to be nothing better, bad as this is.



[85]

Game VI.—Played by correspondence between Mr. Cheney,
of Syracuse, N.Y., and two Amateurs of Utica, N.Y.

Go to PGN_16

 WHITE.  (Utica.)  BLACK.  (Syracuse.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. P. takes P.
 6. P. to K's 5th. 6. P. to Q's 4th.
 7. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. 7. Kt. to K's 5th.
 8. B. takes Kt. (ch.) 8. P. takes B.
 9. P. takes P. 9. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
10. Castles.10. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
11. B. to K's 3d.11. Castles.
12. P. to K. R's 3d.12. B. to K. R's 4th.
13. P. to K. Kt's 4th.13. B. to K. Kt's 3d.
14. K. Kt. to R's 2d.14. P. to K. B's 4th.
15. P. to K. B's 3d.15. Kt. to Kt's 6th.
16. R. to K's square.16. P. to K. B's 5th.
17. B. to K. B's 2d.17. Q. to K's 2d.
18. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.18. P. to K. R's 4th.
19. Q. to Q. R's 4th.19. B. to K's sq.
20. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.20. Q. to K's 3d.
21. Q. to Q. Kt's 3d.21. B. to Q's 2d.
22. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.22. P. to K. R's 5th.
23. K. Kt. to K. B's sq.23. P. to Q. R's 4th.
24. K. Kt. takes Kt.24. R. P. takes Kt.
25. B. takes P.25. P. takes B.
26. P. to Q. R's 3d.26. Q. to K. R's 3d.
27. K. to Kt's 2d.27. B. takes K. Kt. P.
28. B. P. takes B.28. B. takes Q. P.
29. Q. R. to Q.
Black announced mate in four moves.


Game VII.—Between Mr. Popert and another fine player of London.

Go to PGN_17

 WHITE.  (Mr. P.)  BLACK.  (Mr. ——.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. Castles.[A] 5. K. Kt. takes P.
 6. P. to Q's 4th. 6. P. to Q's 4th.
 7. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. 7. P. takes Q. P.
 8. P. takes P. 8. K. B. to Q's 3d.
 9. K. Kt. to K's 5th. 9. B. takes Kt.
10. P. takes B.10. Castles.
11. P. to K. B's 4th.11. P. to K. B's 4th.
12. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.12. Q. B. to K's 3d.
13. Q. B. to K's 3d.13. P. to Q. R's 3d.
14. B. takes Kt.14. P. takes B.
15. Q. R. to Q. B's sq.[B]15. Q. to K's sq.
16. Q. to her B's 2d.[C]16. Q. R. to Kt's sq.
17. Kt. takes Kt.17. K. B. P. takes Kt.
18. Q. takes Q. B. P.18. Q. R. takes Q. Kt. P.
19. Q. takes Q.19. R. takes Q.
20. P. to K. B's 5th.[D]20. B. to his sq.
21. Q. R. takes P.21. Q. R. to K's 7th.
22. B. to Q's 4th.22. Q. R. to Q's 7th.[E]
23. B. to Q. B's 3d.23. R. to Q's 8th.
24. P. to K. B's 6th.24. P. takes P.
25. P. takes P.25. Q. B. to K's 3d.
26. R. to K. Kt's 7th. (ch.)26. K. to R's sq.
27. B. to K's 5th.27. B. to K. Kt's sq.
28. R. to K's 7th.28. B. to K. B's 2d.
White now checkmates in two more moves.

[A] Castling before moving the Q. B. P., and before the adverse K. Kt. is in the field, appears safer play.

[B] Threatening to exchange the Kt., and then take Q. B. P. with the Rook.

[C] Intending again to take the Kt., and thus win a Pawn.

[D] Well played, the advance of this Pawn secures to him an irresistible attack.

[E] Transcriber's Note: This move is notated as the impossible 22... Q. R. to Q's 6th. in the original text.



[86]

Game VIII.—Between Mr. Buckle and Mr. Harrwitz.

Go to PGN_18

 WHITE.  (Mr. B.)  BLACK.  (Mr. H.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. Castles. 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. P. to Q's 3d.
 6. P. to K. R's 3d. 6. Castles.
 7. P. to Q's 3d. 7. Q. B. to K's 3d.
 8. K. B. to Kt's 3d. 8. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.
 9. Q. Kt. to K's 2d. 9. Q. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d.
10. Q. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d.10. P. to Q. B's 3d.
11. P. to Q. B's 3d.11. P. to Q's 4th.
12. P. to Q's 4th.12. Q. P. takes K. P.
13. Q. P. takes B.13. P. takes Kt.
14. Q. takes P.14. Q. B. takes K. B.
15. P. takes B.15. K. Kt. to Q's 4th.
16. Kt. to K. B's 5th.[A]16. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.
17. P. takes Kt. P.17. Q. takes P.
18. P. to Q. B's 4th.18. K. Kt. to K. B's 5th.
19. B. takes K. Kt.19. Q. Kt. takes B.
20. K. R. to Q's sq.[B]20. Q. to Q. B's 2d.
21. Q. takes Q. B. P.21. K. R. to Q. B's sq.
22. Q. takes Q.22. R. takes Q.
23. Kt. to Q's 6th.23. Kt. to K's 7th. (ch.)
24. K. to B's sq.24. Kt. to Q's 5th.
25. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.25. P. to K. B's 4th.
26. P. to Q. B's 5th.26. Q. R. to Q. Kt's sq.[C]
27. Q. R. to R's 4th.27. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
28. K. R. to Q. R's sq.28. Kt. to Q. B's 7th.
29. R. takes P.29. R. takes R.
30. R. takes R.30. Kt. takes Q. Kt. P.
31. R. to Q. Kt's 7th.[D]31. R. takes R.
32. Kt. takes R.32. K. to B's 2d.
33. K. to K's 2d.33. K. to K's 2d.
34. K. to Q's 2d.34. K. to Q's 2d.
35. Kt. to R's 5th.35. Kt to R's 3d.
36. Kt. to Q. Kt's 3d.36. K. to Q. B's 3d.
37. K. to Q. B's 3d.37. Kt. takes P.
38. Kt. takes Kt.38. K. takes Kt.
39. P. to K. R's 4th.39. P. to K. R's 3d.
40. P. to K. B's 3d.40. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
41. P. to K. R's 5th.41. P. to K's 5th.
42. P. takes P.42. K. B. P. takes P.
43. P. to K. Kt's 4th.43. K. to Q's 4th.
44. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.44. K. to K's 4th.
45. P. to Q. Kt's 5th.45. K. to K. B's 5th.
46. P. to Q. Kt's 6th.46. P. to K's 6th.
47. P. to Q. Kt's 7th.47. K. to B's 6th.
48. P. becomes a Queen.
And wins.[E]

[87]

[A] This is a very attacking position for the Kt., and generally occasions great embarrassment to an adversary.

[B] Prudently taking possession of an "open file."

[C] Transcriber's Note: This move is notated as the impossible 26... K. R. to Q. Kt's sq. in the original text.

[D] White plays with remarkable care and judgment here.

[E] The termination of this game is an improving lesson in Pawn play.



[88]

Captain Evans's Gambit.
GAME THE FIRST.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 4. B. takes Q. Kt. P. (best)
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. B. to Q. R's 4th.
 6. Castles. 6. P. to Q's 3d. (best)
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. P. takes P.
 8. P. takes P. 8. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 9. B. to Q. Kt's 2d. 9. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
10. P. to Q's 5th.10. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.
11. B. takes K. Kt.11. P. takes B.
12. K. Kt. to Q's 4th.12. B. takes Kt.
Equal game.


First Variation,
Commencing at Black's 4th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
4. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.4. Q. Kt. takes Kt. P.
5. P. to Q. B's 3d.5. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
(See Second Variation.)


Second Variation,
Commencing at Black's 5th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 4. B. takes Q. Kt. P.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 6. P. to Q's 4th. 6. P. takes P.
 7. P. takes P 7. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 8. Castles. 8. P. to Q's 3d.
 9. P. to Q's 5th. 9. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.
10. Q. B. to Q. Kt's 2d.10. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
Same position as in the game given first.


[89]

Variation III.
Beginning at White's 6th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 4. B. takes Kt. P.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 6. Castles. 6. P. to Q's 3d.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. P. takes P.
 8. P. takes P. 8. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 9. Q. B. to Q. R's 3d. 9. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
10. P. to K's 5th.10. P. takes P.
11. Q. to her Kt's 3d.
And your game is preferable to Black's.


GAME THE SECOND.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 4. B. takes Kt. P.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. B. to Q. R's 4th.
 6. Castles. 6. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 7. K. Kt. to his 5th. 7. Castles.
 8. P to K. B's 4th. 8. P. to Q's 4th.
 9. P. takes Q. P. 9. K. Kt. takes P.
10. P. to Q's 4th.10. P. to K. R's 3d.
11. Q. to her Kt's 3d.11. P. takes Kt.
12. B. takes Kt.12. K. P. takes B. P.
13. P. to K. Kt's 3d.13. Kt. to K's 2d.
Black has the advantage.


[90]

Variation I.
Beginning at White's 7th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 4. B. takes Kt. P.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. B. to Q. R's 4th.
 6. Castles. 6. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. P. takes P.
 8. P. to K's 5th. 8. K. Kt. to K's 5th.
 9. Q. to her Kt's 3d. 9. Castles.
10. Q. B. to Q. R's 3d.10. P. to Q's 3d.
11. Q. B. P. takes P.11. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
12. Q. to K's 3d.12. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.
13. B. to Q's 5th.
And you win a piece.


GAME THE THIRD
Varying from the preceding at Black's 7th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 4. B. takes Kt. P.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. B. to Q. R's 4th.
 6. Castles. 6. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. Castles.
 8. P. takes K. P. 8. Kt. takes K. P.
 9. Q. to Q's 3d. 9. Kt. to Q. B's 4th.
10. Q. to her 5th.10. Kt. to K's 3d.
11. Q. B. to Q. R's 3d.11. K. R. to K's sq.
You may then move 12. K. to R's sq., or
12. P. to K. Kt's 3d., and have a good game.

[91]

GAMES

ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE EVANS GAMBIT.

Game 1.—Between Mr. Morphy and Mr. Anderssen.

Go to PGN_19

 WHITE.  (Mr. M.)  BLACK.  (Mr. A.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 4. B. takes P.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. B. to Q. R's 4th.
 6. P. to Q's 4th. 6. K. P. takes Q. P.
 7. Castles. 7. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 8. P. to K's 5th. 8. P. to Q's 4th.
 9. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. 9. K. Kt. to K's 5th.
10. P. takes P.10. Castles.
11. B. takes Kt.11. P. takes B.
12. Q. to Q. R's 4th.12. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
13. Q. takes Q. B. P.13. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
14. Q. B. to Q. Kt's 2d.14. B. takes Kt.
15. P. takes B.15. K. Kt. to his 4th.
16. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.16. K. R. to K's sq.
17. K. to R's sq.17. K. Kt. to K. R's 6th.
18. P. to K. B's 4th.18. Q. to K. R's 5th.
19. Q. takes Q. P.19. Kt. takes P. (ch.)
20. K. to Kt's sq.20. Kt. to Q's 6th.
21. Q. B. to B's 3d.21. Kt. takes K. B. P.
22. Q. to K. B's 3d.22. Kt. to R's 6th. (ch.)
23. K. to R's sq.23. Kt. to K. Kt's 4th.
24. Q. to K. Kt's 2d.24. Q. R. to Q's sq.
25. R. to K. Kt's sq.25. P. to K. R's 3d.
26. Q. R. to K. B's sq.26. Q. to K. R's 6th.
27. Q. to Q. B's 6th.27. Q. to her 2d.
28. Q. to K. Kt's 2d.28. B. takes Q. P.
29. B. takes B.29. Q. takes B.
30. Kt. to K. B's 3d.30. Q. to her 4th.
31. P. to K. R's 4th.31. Kt. to K's 3d.
32. Q. to K. Kt's 4th.32. Q. to Q. B's 3d.
33. R. to K. Kt's 2d.33. R. to Q's 6th.
34. Q. to K. B's 5th.34. K. R. to Q's sq.
35. Q. to K. B's 6th.35. Q. to Q's 4th.
36. Q. to K. B's 5th.36. R. to Q's 8th.
37. R. takes R.37. Q. takes R. (ch.)
38. K. to R's 2d.38. R. to Q's 6th.
39. R. to K. B's 2d.39. R. to K's 6th.
40. Kt. to Q's 2d.40. R. to K's 7th.
41. Q. takes P. (ch.)41. K. to R's sq.
42. Kt. to K's 4th.42. R. takes R. (ch.)
43. Kt. takes R.43. Q. to Q's 4th.
44. Kt. to K. Kt's 4th.44. Q. takes R. P. (ch.)
45. K. to Kt's 3d.45. Q. to Q. Kt's 6th. (ch.)
46. K. to R's 2d.46. Q. to Q. B's 7th. (ch.)
47. K. to Kt's 3d.47. Q. to Q. B's 6th. (ch.)
48. K. to R's 2d.48. Q. to Q. B's 3d.
49. P. to K. R's 5th.49. P. to Q. R's 4th.
50. Kt. to K. B's 6th.50. P. takes Kt.
51. Q. takes P. (ch.)51. K. to Kt. sq.
52. Q. to Kt's 6th. (ch.)52. K. to B's sq.
53. Q. takes R. P. (ch.)53. K. to his sq.
54. Q. to Kt's 6th. (ch.)54. K. to Q's 2d.
55. P. to K. R's 6th.55. Q. to her 4th.
56. P. to K. R's 7th.56. Q. takes P. (ch.)
57. K. to Kt's sq.57. Kt. to K. Kt's 4th.
58. P. to R's 8th. (2d Q.)58. Q. takes Q.
69. Q. takes Kt.59. Q. to her 5th. (ch.)
60. K. to B's sq.60. P. to Q. R's 5th.
61. Q. to K. B's 5th. (ch.)61. K. to Q. B's 3d.
62. Q. to Q. B's 8th.62. K. to Q. Kt's 4th.
63. K. to his sq.63. P. to Q. B's 4th.
64. Q. to Q. Kt's 7th. (ch.)64. K. to Q. B's 5th.
65. Q. to K. B's 7th. (ch.)65. K. to Q. B's 6th.
66. Q. to K. B's 3d. (ch.)66. Q. to her 6th.
67. Q. to K. B's 6th. (ch.)67. K. to Q. Kt's 6th.
68. Q. to Q. Kt's 6th. (ch.)68. K. to B's 7th.
69. Q. to Q. R's 7th.69. Q. to Q. B's 6th. (ch.)
70. K. to K's 2d.70. P. to R's 6th.
71. Q. to Q. R's 4th. (ch.)71. K. to Kt's 7th.
72. Q. to Kt's 5th. (ch.)72. Q. to Kt's 6th.
And White resigns.


[92]

Game II.—Between Mr. Mead, of N.Y.,
and another strong player.

Go to PGN_20

 WHITE.  (Mr. ——.)  BLACK.  (Mr. M.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 4. B. takes P.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. B. to Q. R's 4th.
 6. Castles. 6. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. P. takes P.
 8. K. Kt. to Kt's 5th. 8. Q. Kt. to K's 4th.
 9. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d. 9. P. to Q's 4th.
10. P. takes P.10. P. to K. R's 3d.
11. P. to K. B's 4th.11. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
12. Q. to K's sq.12. P. takes Kt.
13. P. takes Kt.13. Kt. takes P.
14. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.14. B. to K's 7th.
15. K. B. to Q. R's 4th. (ch.)15. P. to Q. B's 3d.
16. Q. B. takes P.16. Q. to Q. Kt's 3d.
17. P. to Q. B's 4th.17. P. to Q's 6th. (dis. ch.)
18. R. to K. B's 2d.18. Q. to Q. Kt's 7th.
19. P. takes Kt.19. Q. takes Q. R.
20. P. to K. R's 3d.20. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
21. P. takes P.21. B. takes R. (ch.)
22. K. takes B.22. Q. to Q's 5th. (ch.)
23. Q. B. interposes.23. Q. takes K. B.
24. P. takes P.24. Q. R. to Q. Kt's sq.
25. Q. takes K. Kt. P.25. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
26. K. to Kt's sq.26. Q. R. takes P.
27. Kt. to Q's 2d.27. Q. to K. R's 2d.
28. Q. to K. B's 6th.28. Castles.
29. Q. to Q. B's 6th.29. Q. R. to K's 2d.
30. Kt. to K's 4th.30. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.
31. Kt. to K. B's 6th. (ch.)31. K. to R's sq.
32. Q. to Q's 6th.32. R. to K. Kt's sq.
33. Kt. takes R.33. Q. takes Q.
34. P. takes Q.34. R. takes B.
35. P. to Q's 7th.35. P. to Q's 7th.
36. P. queens.36. P. queens. (ch.)
37. Q. takes Q.37. B. takes Q.
And White resigns.


[93]

Game III.—Between Mr. Anderssen and Mr. Hillel.

Go to PGN_21

 WHITE.  (Mr. A.)  BLACK.  (Mr. H.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 4. B. takes P.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. B. to Q. R's 4th.
 6. P. to Q's 4th. 6. P. takes P.
 7. Castles. 7. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 8. P. takes P. 8. P. to Q's 3d.
 9. P. to K. R's 3d. 9. Q. to K. B's 3d.
10. B. to Q. Kt's 2d.10. K. Kt. to R's 3d.
11. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.11. Castles.
12. P. to K's 5th.12. P. takes P.
13. P. takes P.13. Q. to K's 2d.
14. Q. Kt. to K's 4th.14. B. to K's 3d.
15. B. to Q's 3d.15. B. to K. B's 4th.
16. Kt. to K. B's 6th. (ch.)16. P. takes Kt.
17. P. takes P.17. Q. to K's sq.
18. Q. to Q's 2d.18. B. to K's 6th.
19. P. takes B.19. B. takes B.
20. Q. takes B.20. Q. R. to Q's sq.
21. Q. to Q. R's 3d.21. K. Kt. to B's 4th.
22. Q. R. to K's sq.22. Q. to K's 5th.
23. Kt. to Kt's 5th.23. Q. to K. R's 5th.
24. P. to K's 4th.24. K. Kt. to Q's 5th.
25. Kt. to K. B's 3d.25. Kt. takes Kt. (ch.)
26. Q. takes Kt.26. Q. R. to Q's 7th.
27. B. to Q. B's 3d.27. R. takes Q. R. P.
28. P. to K's 5th.28. Kt. to Q's 5th.
29. B. takes Kt.29. Q. takes B. (ch.)
30. K. to R's sq.30. K. to R's sq.
31. Q. R. to K's 4th.31. Q. to Q. Kt's 7th.
32. Q. R. to K. R's 4th.32. Q. takes K. P.
33. Q. to Q's 3d.33. P. to K. R's 4th.
34. Q. to K. B's 5th.34. Q. takes Q.
35. K. R. takes Q.35. K. to R's 2d.
36. R. to K. Kt's 5th.36. K. to R's 3d.
37. Q. R. takes P.
Mate.


[94]

Game IV.—Between Mr. Morphy and Mr. Marache

Go to PGN_22

WHITE. (Mr. Marache.)BLACK. (Mr. Morphy.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. Kt. to K. B's 3d. 2. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 4. B. takes P.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. B. to R's 4th.
 6. P. to Q's 4th. 6. P. takes P.
 7. P. to K's 5th. 7. P. to Q's 4th.
 8. P. takes P.en passant. 8. Q. takes P.
 9. Castles. 9. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
10. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th.10. Castles.
11. B. to Q's 3d.11. B. to K. B's 4th.
12. B. takes B.12. Kt. takes B.
13. B. to Q. R's 3d.13. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.
14. B. takes R.14. Q. takes Kt.
15. B. to R's 3d.15. P. takes P.
16. B. to Q. B's sq.16. Q. to Kt's 3d.
17. B. to K. B's 4th.17. R. to Q's sq.
18. Q. to Q. B's 2d.18. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th.
19. Q. to K's 4th.19. K. Kt. to Kt's 6th
20. Q. takes Q.20. Q. Kt. Mates.


[95]

The Two Knights' Defence.

This, like the Evans Gambit, and the Queen's Pawn Game or Scotch Gambit, is a variation merely of the Giuoco Piano; the second player, instead of moving at his 3d move, K. B. to Q. B's 4th, bringing out his K. Kt. to B's 3d.

GAME THE FIRST.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. K. Kt. to his 5th. 4. P. to Q's 4th.
 5. P. takes P. 5. K. Kt. takes P.
 6. K. Kt. takes K. B. P. 6. K. takes Kt.
 7. Q. to K. B's 3d. (ch.) 7. K. to his 3d.
 8. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 3d. 8. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.
 9. P. to Q's 4th. 9. P. to Q. B's 3d.
10. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.10. P. to K. R's 3d.
11. Q. B. takes Kt.11. B. takes B.
12. Castles on Q's side.12. K. R. to B's sq
13. Q. to K's 4th.13. Q. to her 3d.
14. K. R. to K's sq.14. B. to K. B's 4th.
15. P. to K. Kt's 4th.15. B. to Kt's 4th. (ch.)
16. K. to Kt's sq.16. R. to B's 5th.
17. Q. to K. R's 7th.17. B. to K. B's 3d.
18. P. takes P.18. B. takes P.
19. B. takes Kt. (ch.)19. P. takes B.
20. Kt. takes P.
And you must win easily.


GAME THE SECOND.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. K. Kt. to his 5th. 4. K. Kt. takes K. P.
 5. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.) 5. K. to his 2d.
 6. P. to Q's 3d. 6. Kt. to K. B's 3d
 7. B. to Q. Kt's 3d. 7. P. to Q's 4th.
 8. P. to K. B's 4th. 8. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
 9. Q. to her 2d. 9. P. to K. R's 3d.
10. P. takes K. P.10. Q. Kt. takes P.
11. Q. to K's 3d.11. P. takes Kt.
12. Q. takes Kt. (ch.)12. K. to B's 2d.
13. Castles.13. B. to Q's 3d.
14. Q. takes Q. P. (ch.)
And you must win.

[96]

GAMES

ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE TWO KNIGHTS' GAME.

Game I.—Between Von H. der Laza and Mr. M.

Go to PGN_23

 WHITE.  (V. H. d. L.)  BLACK.  (Mr. M.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. K. Kt. to his 5th. 4. P. to Q's 4th.
 5. P. takes P. 5. Kt. takes P.
 6. Kt. takes K. B. P. 6. K. takes Kt.
 7. Q. to K. B's 3d. (ch.) 7. K. to his 3d.
 8. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 8. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.
 9. P. to Q's 4th. 9. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.
10. Kt. takes P.10. P. to Q. B's 3d.
11. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.11. Q. to her Kt's 3d.
12. P. takes K. P.12. Q. B. to Kt's 2d.
13. Kt. to K's 4th.13. Q. to Kt's 5th. (ch.)
14. Q. B. to Q's 2d.14. Q. takes K. B.
15. Q. to K. Kt's 4th. (ch.)15. K. takes P.
16. P. to K. B's 4th. (ch.)16. K. to Q's 5th.
17. P. to Q. B's 3d. (ch.)17. Kt. takes B. P.
18. B. takes Kt. (ch.)18. K. takes Kt.
19. P. to B's 5th. (dis. ch.)19. K. to Q's 4th.
20. Castles on Q's side. (ch.)20. K. to B's 4th.
21. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. (ch.)21. K. to Kt's 4th.
22. P. to Q. R's 4th. (ch.)22. K. takes P.
23. Q. takes Q.23. Kt. to Q's 4th.
24. K. to Q. Kt's 2d, and wins.


Game II.—Between two members of the Berlin Chess Club.

Go to PGN_24

 WHITE.  (Mr. M.)  BLACK.  (Mr. H.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. K. Kt. to his 5th. 4. P. to Q's 4th.
 5. P. takes P. 5. K. Kt. takes P.
 6. Kt. takes K. B. P. 6. K. takes Kt.
 7. Q. to K. B's 3d. (ch.) 7. K. to his 3d.
 8. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 8. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.
 9. P. to Q's 4th. 9. P. to Q. B's 3d.
10. P. takes P.10. Q. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d.
11. Castles.11. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th.
12. Kt. takes Kt.12. P. takes Kt.
13. K. R. to Q's sq.13. Kt. to K's 2d.[A]
14. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.14. K. R. to B's sq.
15. B. takes Kt.15. K. takes B.
16. Q. to her Kt's 3d.16. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
17. R. takes Q. P.17. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.)
18. K. to R's sq.18. Q. to her Kt's 3d.
19. Q. to her R's 3d. (ch.)19. K. to his sq.
20. Q. to R's 4th. (ch.)20. K. to his 2d.
21. Q. R. to Q's sq.21. R. to K. B's 4th.
22. R. to Q's 7th. (ch.)22. K. to B's sq.
23. K. R. to Q's 8th. (ch.)23. K. to his 2d.
24. Q. R. to Q's 7th. (ch.)[B]24. B. takes R.
25. Q. takes B., mate.

[A] Better to take the Bishop with Pawn, and give up the Queen.

[B] He might have mated the King on the move at K's 8th.



[97]

The Knight's Game of Ruy Lopez.

GAME THE FIRST.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
3. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th.3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.

By his 3d move, White threatens to take the Q. Kt. with his B., and then to take the K. P. with his K. Kt., winning the P.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
4. Q. to K's 2d.4. K. B. to K's 2d.
5. P. to Q. B's 3d.5. P. to Q's 3d.
6. P. to Q's 4th.6. P. takes P.
7. Kt. takes P.7. B. to Q's 2d.
8. Kt. takes Q. Kt.8. B. takes Kt.
9. B. takes B. (ch.)9. P. takes B.

And his Bishop is locked, and the position altogether in your favor.

[98]

GAME THE SECOND.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. Q. to K. B's 3d.
 5. Castles. 5. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
 6. P. to Q's 4th. 6. P. takes P.
 7. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th. 7. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.
 8. B. takes K. Kt. 8. Q. Kt. takes B.
 9. P. takes P. 9. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
10. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.10. Castles.
Your game is a little better developed.


Variation I.
Beginning at Black's 4th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. P. to Q's 3d.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. P. takes P.
 6. P. takes P. 6. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.)
 7. K. to his 2d. 7. P. to Q's 4th.
 8. Q. to her R's 4th. 8. P. takes K. P.
 9. B. takes Kt. (ch.) 9. P. takes B.
10. Q. takes P. (ch.)10. Q. B. to Q's 2d.
11. Q. takes K. P. (ch.)
And the game is much in your favor.


GAMES

ILLUSTRATIVE OF RUY LOPEZ'S KNIGHT'S GAME

Game I.—Between Mr. Anderssen and Mr. Morphy.

Go to PGN_25

 WHITE.  (Mr. A.)  BLACK.  (Mr. M.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. 3. P. to Q. R's 3d.
 4. B. to Q. R's 4th. 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. P. to Q's 3d. 5. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 6. P. to Q. B's 3d. 6. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.
 7. K. B. to Q. B's 2d. 7. P. to Q's 4th.
 8. P. takes P. 8. Kt. takes P.
 9. P. to K. R's 3d. 9. Castles.
10. Castles.10. P. to K. R's 3d.
11. P. to Q's 4th.11. P. takes P.
12. P. takes P.12. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
13. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.13. K. Kt. to Q. Kt's 5th.
14. K. B. to Q. Kt's sq.14. Q. B. to K's 3d.
15. P. to Q. R's 3d.15. K. Kt. to Q's 4th.
16. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.16. K. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
17. Q. B. to K's 3d.17. K. R. to K's sq.
18. Q. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d.18. Q. B. to Q. B's 5th.
19. Q. Kt. to K. B's 5th.19. Q. B. takes R.
20. Q. takes B.20. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.
21. K. Kt. to K. R's 4th.21. Kt. takes Kt.
22. Kt. takes Kt.22. Q. to Q's 2d.
23. Q. B. takes K. R. P.23. P. takes B.
24. Q. to Q. B's sq.24. B. takes Q. P.
25. Q. takes K. R. P.25. R. to K's 8th. (ch.)
26. K. to R's 2d.26. Kt. to K's 5th.
27. B. takes Kt.27. R. takes B.
28. Q. to K. Kt's 5th. (ch.)28. K. to B's sq.
29. Q. to R's 6th. (ch.)29. K. to his sq.
30. Kt. takes B.30. Q. to her 3d. (ch.)
31. Q. takes Q.31. P. takes Q.
32. R. to Q's sq.32. K. to K. B's sq.
33. R. to Q's 2d.33. Q. R. to K's sq.
34. P. to K. Kt's 4th.34. Q. R. to K's 4th.
35. P. to K. B's 3d.35. K. R. to K's 8th.
36. P. to K. R's 4th.36. Q. R. to Q's 4th.
37. K. to Kt's 3d.37. P. to Q. R's 4th.
38. P. to K. R's 5th.38. K. to Kt's sq.
39. K. to B's 2d.39. R. to K's sq.
40. K. to Kt's 3d.40. K. to R's 2d.
41. K. to B's 4th.41. R. to K's 2d.
42. K. to Kt's 3d.42. P. to K. B's 3d.
43. K. to B's 4th.43. R. to K's sq.
44. K. to Kt's 3d.44. R. to K's 2d.
And the game was drawn.


[99]

Game II.—Between Dr. E. Lasker and Wm. Steinitz.

Go to PGN_26

 WHITE.  (Dr. L.)  BLACK.  (Mr. S.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. Kt. to K. B's 3d. 2. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
 3. B. to Kt's 5th. 3. P. to Q's 3d.
 4. P. to Q's 4th. 4. B. to Q's 2d.
 5. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
 6. B. to K's 3d.[A] 6. Kt. to Kt's 3d.[B]
 7. Q. to Q's 2d. 7. B. to K's 2d.
 8. Castles Q. R. 8. P. to Q. R's 3d.
 9. B. to K's 2d. 9. P. takes P.
10. Kt. takes P.10. Kt. takes Kt.
11. Q. takes Kt.[C]11. B. to K. B's 3d.
12. Q. to Q's 2d.12. B. to B's 3d.[D]
13. Kt. to Q's 5th.13. Castles.
14. P. to K. Kt's 4th.[E]14. R. to K's sq.[F]
15. P. to Kt's 5th.?15. B. takes Kt.
16. Q. takes B.[G]16. R. to K's 4th!
17. Q. to Q's 2d.17. B. takes P.
18. P. to K. B's 4th.18. R. takes P.
19. P. takes B.19. Q. to K's 2d.
20. Q. R. to B's sq.[H]20. R. takes B.
21. B. to B's 4th.21. Kt. to R's sq.
22. P. to K. R's 4th.22. P. to Q. B's 3d.
23. P. to Kt's 6th![I]23. P. to Q's 4th.
24. P. takes R. P. (ch.)24. K. takes P.
25. B. to Q's 3d. (ch.)25. K. to Kt's sq.
26. P. to R's 5th.26. R. to K's sq.
27. P. to R's 6th.27. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
28. P. to R's 7th. (ch.)28. K. to Kt's 2d.
29. K. to Kt's sq.29. Q. to K's 4th.
30. P. to R's 3d.[J]30. P. to Q. B's 4th.
31. Q. to B's 2d.31. P. to B's 5th.!
32. Q. to R's 4th.32. P. to B's 3d.
33. B. to B's 5th.![K]33. K. to B's 2d.
34. K. R. to Kt's sq.34. P. takes B.
35. Q. to R's 5th. (ch.)35. K. to K's 2d.
36. R. to Kt's 8th.36. K. to Q'S 3d.?
37. R. takes P.37. Q. to K's 3d.
38. R. takes R.38. Q. takes R.
39. R. takes B. P. (ch.)39. K. to B's 4th.[L]
40. Q to R's 6th.[M]40. R. to K's 2d.
41. Q. to R's 2d.!41. Q. to Q's 2d.[N]
42. Q. to Kt's sq. (ch.)42. P. to Q's 5th.
43. Q. to Kt's 5th. (ch.)43. Q. to Q's 4th.
44. R. to K. B's 5th.44. Q. takes R.
45. Q. takes Q. (ch.)45. K. to Q's 3d.
46. Q. to B's 6th. (ch.)46. Resigns.

[100]

[A] White in this instance had probably made up his mind to adopt the plan frequently employed by Gunsberg in the Giuoco Piano, namely, playing Q. to Q's 2d and Castling rapidly on the Queen's side.—Gunsberg.

[B] ... Black's difficulty is how to dispose of the Kt. Now Kt's 3d in this instance, although perhaps preferable, is not a good place either, subject as it must be to an early attack from the K. R. P.—Hoffer.

[C] If 11. B. takes Kt., Kt. to B's 5th; and the Kt. cannot be captured on account of B. to Kt's 4th winning the Queen.—Leeds Mercury.

[D] ... There seems little use in this move. Either he can Castle now; if not, then it is proof positive that his defence is bad.—Gunsberg.

[E] This premature advance is admirably taken advantage of by Steinitz.—Leeds Mercury.

[F] ... Although this looks like a defensive move, (to make room for the Kt.) it is a subtle design which was entirely overlooked by Lasker.—Hoffer.

[G] But here is a great mistake, which ought to lose the game. 16. P. takes Q. B. would have averted the loss of a Pawn, but at the expense of position and attack; he was outplayed by Steinitz up to this point.

[H] From this move to the end Lasker exhibits most marvellous power of resource. With 20. Q. R. to B's sq. he commenced one of the most ingenious attacks.

[I] One of the moves which will make this game memorable. The object is, if P. takes P. to open up the Rook's file by P. to R's 5th. Allowance must of course be made for the fact that, being two Pawns behind, White has nothing to lose and everything to gain by desperate tactics.—Gunsberg.

[J] Exhibiting consummate coolness in a "do or die" predicament.—Pollock.

[K] 33. B. to B's 5th is evidence with what perfect lucidity Lasker detects the weak spots, and how immediately he takes advantage of his opponent's slightest omission or commission.—Hoffer.

[L] ... Imprudent. The King should make for safety in the corner, via B's 2d.—Mason.

[M] Threatening R. to B's 8th.—Gunsberg.

[N] ... 41. Q. to Q's 2d is a final blunder. 41. R to Q's 2d should have been played, or R. to K's 3d. The game is now over. It will be readily admitted that it is a well-earned victory which none will grudge the plucky young player.—Hoffer.

... We really cannot see a satisfactory move, for if R. to K's 3d, then follows Q. to B's 2d (ch.), and R. to B's 8th. Or if Q. to Q's sq. then likewise Q. to B's 2d (ch.) should gain some advantage, as, on King playing to Kt's 4th, White could continue with P. to R's 4th (ch.) and Q. to Q. B's 5th, &c.—Gunsberg.


[101]

The Queen's Pawn Game, or Scotch Gambit.

GAME THE FIRST.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
3. P. to Q's 4th.3. Kt. takes P.
It is from your third move the opening derives
its name of "The Queen's Pawn Game."
4. Kt. takes Kt.4. P. takes Kt.
5. Q. takes P.5. Kt. to K's 2d.
6. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.6. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
7. Q. to her 5th.7. Q. to K. B's 3d. (best)
8. Castles.8. B. to K's 2d.

You have a better opened game, but the superiority is not important.

Variation I.
Beginning at White's 4th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
3. P. to Q's 4th.3. Kt. takes P.
4. Kt. takes P.4. Kt. to K's 3d.
5. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.5. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
6. Castles.6. P. to Q's 3d.
7. Kt. to K. Kt's 4th.7. B. to K's 2d.

Your game is less confined than his, but you have very little advantage.

[102]

GAME THE SECOND.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. takes P.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. P. to Q's 6th.
 6. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 6. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 7. P. to Q. Kt's 5th. 7. Q. to K's 2d.
 8. Castles. 8. Kt. to K's 4th.
 9. Kt. takes Kt. 9. Q. takes Kt.
10. Q. to her Kt's 3d.10. Q. to K. B's 3d, K's 2d.
11. P. to K's 5th.
You have a fine game.


Variation I.
Beginning at White's 5th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. takes P.
 4. K's B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th
 5. K. Kt. to his 5th. 5. K. Kt. to R's 3d. (best)
 6. Kt. takes K. B's P. 6. Kt. takes Kt.
 7. B. takes Kt. (ch.) 7. K. takes B.
 8. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.) 8. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
 9. Q. takes B. 9. P. to Q's 3d.
10. Q. to her Kt's 5th.10. P. to Q. R's 3d.
11. Q. to her 3d.11. K. to Kt's 2d.
12. Castles.12. Q. B. to K's 3d.
13. P. to Q. B's 3d.13. Q. to K. B's 3d.
14. B. to Q's 2d.
You appear to me to have the better game.


[103]

Variation II.
Beginning at White's 5th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
3. P. to Q's 4th.3. P. takes P.
4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
5. Castles.5. P. to Q's 3d.
6. P. to Q. B's 3d.6. P. takes P.
7. Q. Kt. takes P.7. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
8. K. Kt. to his 5th.8. Kt. to K's 4th.

And he has at least as good a game as you have. This variation serves to prove that your castling on the 5th move is less advisable than the move of 5. P. to Q. B's 3d.

Variation III.,
Beginning at Black's 4th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
3. P. to Q's 4th.3. P. takes P.
4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.4. P. to Q's 3d.

Black now relinquishes the defence of the P. he has gained, but he also in some degree neutralizes your attack.

5. P. to Q. B's 3d.5. P. takes P.
6. Q. Kt. takes P.
You have certainly the advantage in position.


Variation IV.,
Beginning also at Black's 4th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. takes P.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. Q. to K. B's 3d.
 5. Castles. 5. P. to Q's 3d.
 6. P. to Q. B's 3d. 6. P. to Q's 6th.
 7. Q. takes P. 7. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.
 8. Q. B. to K. B's 4th. 8. B. to K's 2d.
 9. Q. Kt. to Q. R's 3d. 9. P. to Q. R's 3d.
10. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 2d.10. K. Kt. to R's 3d.

Your game is better opened, but there is no very striking disparity in the positions.

[104]

GAME THE THIRD.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. takes P.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.)
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. P. takes P.
 6. Castles. 6. P. to Q. B's 7th.
 7. Q. takes P. 7. P. to Q's 3d.
 8. P. to Q. R's 3d. 8. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 9. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 9. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
10. Q. B. to Kt's 2d.10. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
The game is about even.


GAME THE FOURTH.
Mr. Cochrane's Attack.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. takes P.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. K. B. checks.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. P. takes P.
 6. P. takes P. 6. B. to Q. R's 4th.
 7. P. to K's 5th. 7. P. to Q's 4th. (best)
P. to K's 5th is the move adopted by Mr. Cochrane.
 8. Q. takes P. 8. Q. takes Q.
 9. B. takes Q. 9. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
10. K. B. takes Q. Kt. (ch.)10. Kt. takes B.
11. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.11. Castles.
12. Castles.12. K. R. to K's sq.
13. P. to K. R's 3d.
The game is equal.


[105]

Variation.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. takes P.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. K. B. checks.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. P. takes P.
 6. P. takes P. 6. B. to Q. R's 4th.
 7. Castles. 7. P. to Q's 3d.
 8. P. to K's 5th. 8. Q's B. to K's 3d.
 9. B. takes B. 9. P. takes B.
10. Q. to her Kt's 3d.10. Q. to B's sq.
11. P. takes Q's P.11. P. takes P.
12. K's Kt. to his 5th.

Followed by R. to K's sq., and you appear to me to have a better game than Black.

GAME THE FIFTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. takes P.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. K. B. checks.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. P. takes P.
 6. Castles. 6. P. takes Q. Kt. P.
 7. Q. B. takes P. 7. K. B. to his sq.
 8. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 8. K. Kt. to R's 3d.
 9. P. to K's 5th. 9. K. B. to K's 2d.
10. Q. Kt. to K's 4th.10. Castles.
11. Q. to her 2d.11. P. to Q's 3d.
12. Kt. to K. B's 6th. (ch.)
You have an excellent attack.


[106]

Variation,
Beginning at Black's 7th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. takes P.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. K. B. checks.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. P. takes P.
 6. Castles. 6. P. takes Q. Kt. P.
 7. Q. B. takes P. 7. K. to B's sq.
 8. P. to K's 5th. 8. Q. to K's 2d.
 9. P. to Q. R's 3d. 9. B. to Q. B's 4th.
10. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.10. P. to Q's 3d.
11. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th.11. Q. to her 2d.
12. R. to K's sq.12. P. takes K. P.
13. Q. B. takes P.13. Kt. takes B.
14. Kt. takes Kt.14. Q. to her sq.
15. Kt. takes K. B. P.
And you must win.


GAME THE SIXTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. takes P.
 4. Kt. takes P. 4. Q. to K. R's 5th.
 5. K. Kt. to Q. Kt's 5th. 5. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 6. Q. to K. B's 3d. 6. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th.
 7. Kt. takes Q. B. P. (ch.) 7. K. to Q's sq. (best)
 8. Q. to K. B's 4th. 8. Kt. takes Q. B. P. (ch.)
 9. K. to Q's sq. 9. Q. takes Q.
10. B. takes Q.10. Kt. takes Q. R.
11. Kt. takes Q. R.
[107]

I believe the best answering moves have been made by Black, and now, upon surveying the aspect of the board, there can be no question, I apprehend, that your game is much superior. The Kt. which has captured your Rook, he can never extricate, while, to secure yours in the same position, he must lose many moves, and thus afford you ample time for the development of your remaining forces.

Variation,
Beginning at Black's 5th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. Q's Kt. to B's 3d.
3. P. to Q's 4th.3. P. takes P.
4. Kt. takes P.4. Q. to K. R's 5th.
5. Kt. to Q. Kt's 5th.5. Q. takes K's P. (ch.)
6. B. to K's 2d.6. K. to Q's sq.
7. Castles.7. P. to Q. R's 3d.
8. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.8. Q. to K's sq.
9. K. Kt. to Q's 4th.

And again, I believe, with the strangely changed positions of his King and Queen, and the facility afforded you for bringing the Pieces into immediate action, that the game is very much in your favor.

GAME THE SEVENTH.
Varying from the preceding at Black's 4th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. takes P.
 4. Kt. takes P. 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 5. Kt. takes Q. Kt. 5. Q. to K. B's 3d.
 6. Q. to K. B's 3d. 6. Q. takes Q.
 7. P. takes Q. 7. Q. Kt. P. takes Kt.
 8. Q. B. to K. B's 4th. 8. P. to Q's 3d.
 9. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 9. Q. B. to K's 3d.
10. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.
And the game is in every respect equal.

[108]

GAMES

ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE QUEEN'S PAWN GAME
OR SCOTCH GAMBIT.

Game I.—Played by Telegraph, in the Match between
Philadelphia and New York, in 1858.

Go to PGN_27

 WHITE.  (Phila.)  BLACK.  (N.Y.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. Kt. to K. B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. takes P.
 4. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. Kt. to K. B's 3d.[A]
 6. P. to K's 5th. 6. P. to Q's 4th.
 7. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. 7. K. Kt. to K's 5th.
 8. P. takes P. 8. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 9. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.[B] 9. Castles.
10. B. takes Kt.10. P. takes B.
11. Q. to Q. B's 2d.[C]11. Kt. takes Kt.
12. B. takes Kt.12. B. to K. Kt's 5th.[D]
13. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th.[E]13. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
14. Q. to Q. B's 3d.14. P. to K. B's 3d.[F]
15. P. to K. R's 3d.15. B. to K. B's 4th.[G]
16. Kt. to K. B's 3d.16. B. to K's 5th.[H]
17. B. to K. B's 4th.[I]17. P. takes P.
18. B. takes P.18. Q. to K's 2d.[J]
19. Castles. Q. side.[K]19. P. to Q. B's 4th.
20. K. R. to K's sq.[L]20. P. takes P.[M]
21. B. takes P.21. P. to Q. B's 4th.
22. B. to K's 5th.22. Q. R. to K's sq.[N]
23. B. to K. Kt's 3d.23. Q. to Q. Kt's 2d.[O]
24. Kt. to K's 5th.[P]24. P. to Q's 5th.
25. Q. to Q. B's 4th.25. B. to Q's 4th.
26. Q. to Q. R's 4th.[Q]26. R. to K's 3d.[R]
27. Kt. to K. Kt's 4th.27. P. to K. R's 4th.
28. R. takes R.28. B. takes R.
29. Q. to Q. B's 2d.29. K. to R's 2d.
30. R. to K's sq.[S]30. B. to K. B's 4th.[T]
31. Q. to Q's 2d.[U]31. P. takes Kt.
32. P. takes P.32. Q. to Q's 4th.[V]
33. R. to K. R's sq. (ch.)[W]33. K. to K. Kt's sq.
34. P. takes B.34. Q. takes K. B. P.
35. Q. to K. R's 6th.35. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
36. B. to Q's 6th.[X]36. R. to K. B's 3d.
37. Q. to K. R's 5th.[Y]37. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.[Z]
38. Q. to K. R's 8th. (ch.)38. K. to B's 2d.
39. R. to K's sq.[AA]And Black resigns.

[A] The best move.

[B] Preparatory to the move of Q. to Q. B's 2d.

[C] Threatening to win Q. B. P. or take Kt. with Kt., winning Q. P.

[D] If Black had played B. to Q. R's 3d, to prevent White Castling on King's side, White would have won a piece by P. to Q. R's 4th.

[E] A premature move.

[F] The best move.

[G] Better than taking Kt., as White would then have opened the Rook's file.

[H] Better than P. takes P.

[I] The best move.

[J] Intending to advance Q. B. P. A strong move.

[K] An impudent move, in the face of such an attack.

[L] A strong move.

[M] P. to K. B's 5th perhaps stronger.

[N] Weak. We cannot see its object. Why not Q. R. to Q's sq?

[O] The best move.

[P] Preparatory to Kt. to Kt's 4th, and then B. to K's 5th.

[Q] Preventing Black's contemplated move with the Q.

[R] With a view of withdrawing the B. and playing the R. to R's 3d.

[S] The first move of a combination, which gave the victory to Philadelphia.

[T] Insures the winning of the Kt.

[U] A powerful move, as it compels Black to take the Kt., and thereby opens White's R's file.

[V] If B. takes P., White would have played Q. to K. Kt's 5th, threatening to check K. and Q. with R., or win the R.

[W] An all important check before taking B., as it prevented an interposition of R. to R's 4th.

[X] A very attacking move. Much better than B. to K's 5th.

[Y] A better move than checking, as it prevented Black's K. escaping to B's 2d, and then to K's 3d. White also threatened P. to K. Kt's 4th.

[Z] Black would have lost the R. had they taken the B. by a check at K's 8th, and afterwards at his 7th.

[AA] The coup de grace.



[109]

Game II.—Played by Correspondence between
New York and Philadelphia, in 1857.

Go to PGN_28

 WHITE.  (Phila.)  BLACK.  (N.Y.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. Q. Kt. takes P.
 4. Kt. takes Kt. 4. P. takes Kt.
 5. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 5. Q. to K. B's 3d.
 6. Castles. 6. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 7. P. to K's 5th. 7. Q. to K. B's 4th.
 8. P. to Q. B's 3d. 8. P. takes P.
 9. Kt. takes P. 9. Kt. to K's 2d.
10. K. B. to Q's 3d.10. Q. to K's 3d.
11. Kt. to K's 4th.11. B. to Q's 5th.
12. Kt. to Kt's 5th.12. Q. to Q. Kt's 3d.
13. Q. to K. R's 5th.13. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
14. Q. to K. R's 6th.14. B. takes K. P.
15. K. R. to K's sq.15. Q. to K. B's 3d.
16. Kt. to K. B's 3d.16. P. to Q's 3d.
17. B. to K. Kt's 5th.17. Q. to K's 3d.
18. Kt. takes B.18. P. takes Kt.
19. Q. R. to Q. B's sq.19. K. R. to K. B's sq.
20. B. to Q. B's 4th.20. Q. to K. B's 4th.
21. B. takes Kt.21. K. takes B.
22. P. to K. B's 4th.22. P. to K's 5th.
23. B. to Q's 3d.23. B. to K's 3d.
24. B. takes P.24. Q. to Q. R's 4th.
25. Q. to K. R's 4th. (ch.)25. K. to Q's 2d.
26. K. R. to Q's sq. (ch.)26. K. to K's sq.
27. K. to K. R's sq.27. P. to Q. B's 3d.
28. R. takes Q. B. P.28. Q. R. to Q's sq.
29. Q. R. to Q. B's sq.29. R. takes R.
30. R. takes R.30. P. to K. R's 4th.
31. Q. to K. B's 6th.31. B. to Q. B's sq.
32. B. takes Q. Kt. P.

And New York resigns, as they must lose their Q., or be mated in a few moves.

[110]

Game III.—Between Hon. A. B. Meek, of Mobile, and Mr. Marache.

Go to PGN_29

 WHITE.  (Mr. M.)  BLACK.  (Mr. Meek.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. Kt. to K. B's 3d. 2. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. takes P.
 4. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. P. to Q's 6th.
 6. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 6. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 7. P. to Q. R's 4th. 7. P. to Q. R's 4th.
 8. P. to Q. Kt's 5th. 8. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.
 9. Q. to Q. Kt's 3d. 9. P. to Q's 4th.
10. P. takes P.10. Q. to Q's 3d.
11. B. to Q. R's 3d.11. Q. to K. B's 3d.
12. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.12. K. Kt. to K. R's 3d.
13. Q. Kt. to K's 4th.13. P. checks.
14. K. Kt. takes P.14. Q. to K's 4th.
15. P. to Q's 6th.15. P. takes P.
16. B. takes P.16. Q. to K. B's 4th.
17. B. takes Kt.17. K. takes B.
18. Q. to Q. R's 3d. (ch.)18. K. to Q's sq.
19. Q. to Q's 6th. (ch.)
Black resigns.


[111]

Game IV.—Between Messrs. Cochrane and Deschapelles.

Go to PGN_30

 WHITE.  (Mr. C.)  BLACK.  (M. D.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. takes P.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 5. K. Kt. to Kt's 5th. 5. Q. Kt. to K's 4th.[A]
 6. K. B. takes B. P. (ch.) 6. Q. Kt. takes B.
 7. Kt. takes Kt. 7. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.)
 8. P. to Q. B's 3d. 8. P. takes P.
 9. P. takes P. 9. K. B. takes P. (ch.)
10. Q. Kt. takes B.10. K. takes Kt.
11. Q. to her 5th. (ch.)11. K. to B's sq.
12. Q. B. to R's 3d. (ch.)12. P. to Q's 3d.
13. P. to K's 5th.13. Q. to K. Kt's 4th.
14. P. takes P.14. Q. takes Q.
15. P. takes P. (dis. ch.)15. K. to B's 2d.
16. Kt. takes Q.16. Q. B. to Q's 2d.
17. Castles on K's side.17. Q. R. to Q. B's sq.
18. B. to Q's 6th.18. K. to his 3d.
19. Q. B. to K. Kt's 3d.19. Q. B. to his 3d.
20. Q. R. to Q's sq.20. B. takes Kt.
21. K. R. to K's sq. (ch.)21. K. to B's 3d.
22. Q. R. takes B.22. K. Kt. to R's 3d.
23. Q. R. to his 5th.23. Kt. to K. B's 4th.
24. Q. R. to Q. B's 5th.24. Kt. takes B.
25. K. R. P. takes Kt.25. K. to B's 2d.
26. K. R. to Q's sq.26. K. R. to K's sq.
27. K. R. to Q's 3d.27. K. R. to K's 2d.
28. Q. R. to K. B's 5th. (ch.)28. K. to his square.[B]
29. Q. R. to Q's 8th. (ch.)29. R. takes R.
30. R. to K. B's 8th. (ch.)30. K. takes R.
31. P. takes R., becoming a Q. (ch.)
And White wins.

[A] This is not the correct move, he should have played K. Kt. to R's 3d.

[B] K. to his 3d would have saved the game.



The Queen's Bishop's Pawn Game
in the King's Knight's Opening


GAME THE FIRST.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q. B's 3d. 3. P. to K. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q's 4th. 4. P. takes K. P.
 5. Kt. takes K. P. 5. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 6. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. 6. P. to Q. R's 3d.
 7. B. takes Q. Kt. 7. Q. Kt. P. takes B.
 8. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th. 8. Q. B. to Kt's sq.
 9. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 9. Q. B. to Kt's 2d.
10. Castles.10. P. to Q's 4th.
11. P. to K. B's 3d.11. B. to K's 2d.
12. P. takes K. P.12. Castles. (best)
13. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.

And you have a clear Pawn more and a much better game than he has.

[112]

Variation I.
Beginning at Black's 3d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
3. P. to Q. B's 3d.3. P. to Q's 4th.
4. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th.4. P. takes K. P.
5. Kt. takes K. P.5. Q. to K. Kt's 4th
6. Q. to her R's 4th.6. Q. takes Kt.
7. B. takes Kt. (ch.)7. K. to Q's sq.
8. Q. takes K. P.
Gaining a Pawn and a superior position.


GAME THE SECOND.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
3. P. to Q. B's 3d.3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
4. P. to Q's 4th.4. K. Kt takes K. P.
5. P. takes K. P.5. P. to Q's 4th.
6. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th.6. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
7. K. Kt. to Q's 4th.7. B. takes Kt.
8. P. takes B.8. Castles.


[113]

Variation I.
Beginning at Black's 3d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q. B's 3d. 3. K. B. to B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 4. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 5. P. to Q. Kt's 5th. 5. Q. Kt. to R's 4th.
 6. Kt. takes K. P. 6. Q. to K's 2d.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. P. to Q's 3d.
 8. B. to. Q. R's 3d. 8. P. to K. B's 3d.
 9. Kt. to K. B's 3d. 9. Q. takes K. P. (ch.)
10. B. to K's 2d.10. K. Kt. to R's 3d.
11. Castles.11. Castles.
12. K. B. to Q's 3d.
And you have an undoubted advantage of situation.



GAMES

ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE QUEEN'S BISHOP'S PAWN
GAME IN THE KING'S KNIGHT'S OPENING.

Game I.—Between Messrs. Harrwitz and Staunton.

Go to PGN_31

 WHITE.  (Mr. S.)  BLACK.  (Mr. H.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q. B's 3d. 3. P. to K. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q's 4th. 4. K. B. P. takes P.
 5. Kt. takes P. 5. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 6. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. 6. P. to Q. R's 3d.
 7. B. takes Kt. 7. Q. Kt. P. takes B.
 8. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th. 8. Q. R. to Q. Kt's sq.
 9. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 9. Q. B. to Kt's 2d.
10. Q. to Q. R's 4th.10. P. to Q's 4th.
11. Castles.[A]11. P. to K. R's 3d.
12. Q. B. to K. R's 4th.12. Q. to her 3d.
13. B. to K. Kt's 3d.13. K. R. to K. Kt's sq.
14. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.14. Q. R. to Q. B's sq.
15. Q. Kt. to his 3d.15. Kt. to Q's 2d.
16. Q. Kt. to R's 5th.16. Kt. to Kt's 3d.
17. Q. to B's 2d.17. Q. B. to Q. R's sq.
18. P. to K. B's 3d.18. P. takes P.
19. R. takes P.19. Q. to K's 3d.
20. Q. R. to K's sq.20. K. B. to K's 2d.
21. K. Kt. takes Q. B. P.21. Q. takes R. (ch.)
22. B. takes Q.22. B. takes Kt.
23. Q. to K. Kt's 6th. (ch.)23. K. to Q's sq.
24. Kt. takes B. (ch.)
And wins.

[A] The following moves will show the probable result of taking the P. with Kt.:—

11. Kt. takes Q. B. P.11. Q. to her 2d.
12. P. to Q. Kt's 5th.12. R. to Q. R's sq.
(His best move; if P. takes P., then White plays Q. to her R's 7th.)
13. Q. to her sq.13. P. takes P., or B. takes Kt.
And White has little if any advantage.


[114]

Game II.—Between Mr. Horwitz and Captain Evans

Go to PGN_32

 WHITE.  (Capt. E.)  BLACK.  (Mr. H.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q. B's 3d. 3. P. to K. B's 4th.
 4. P. to Q's 4th. 4. P. takes Q. P.
 5. P. to K's 5th. 5. P. takes Q. B. P.
 6. Q. Kt. takes P. 6. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th.
 7. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th. 7. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
 8. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 8. P. to Q's 4th.
 9. P. takes P. in passing. 9. Q. takes P.
10. Q. to K's 2d.10. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th.
11. Kt. takes Kt.11. Q. takes Kt.
12. Castles.12. Q. B. to Q's 2d.
13. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th.13. Castles on Q's side.
14. Q. B. takes Kt.14. B. takes B.
15. Kt. takes B. (ch.)15. K. to Kt's sq.
16. K. R. to Q's sq.16. Q. to K. R's 5th.
17. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.17. Q. to K. R's 3d.
18. R. to Q's 2d.18. P. to K. B's 5th.
19. Q. R. to Q's sq.19. P. to K. B's 6th.
20. Q. takes P.20. P. to Q. R's 3d.
21. R. takes B.21. R. takes R.
22. R. takes R.22. Q. to her B's 8th. (ch.)
23. Q. to her sq.23. Q. takes Kt. P.
24. R. to Q's 8th. (ch.)24. R. takes R.
25. Q. takes R. (ch.)25. K. to R's 2d.
26. Kt. to Q. B's 6th. (ch.)
And White mates in four moves.


[115]

Game III.—Between Captain Evans and Mr. Henderson

Go to PGN_33

 WHITE.  (Capt. E.)  BLACK.  (Mr. H.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q. B's 3d. 3. P. to Q's 4th.
 4. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. 4. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Q. to her R's 4th. 5. Q. to her 3d.
 6. Kt. takes K. P. 6. Q. takes Kt.
 7. B. takes Q. Kt. (ch.) 7. P. takes B.
 8. Q. takes P. (ch.) 8. K. to his 2d.
 9. P. to K. B's 3d. 9. R. to Q's sq.
10. P. to Q's 4th.10. Q. to R's 3d.
11. Q. takes Q. B. P. (ch.)11. R. to Q's 2d.
12. Q. to Q. B's 5th. (ch.)12. K. to his sq.
13. Q. to Q. B's 8th. (ch.)13. B. to Q's sq.
14. Q. takes Q. (ch.)14. B. takes Q.
15. P. to K's 5th.15. P. to K. B's 4th.
16. Kt. to Q's 2d.16. Kt. to K. R's 3d.
17. Kt. to Q. Kt's 3d.17. Kt. to K. B's 2d.
18. P. to K. B's 4th.18. B. to K's 2d.
19. P. to K. R's 4th.19. Kt. to K. R's 3d.
20. K. to his 2d.20. B. to Q's 2d.
21. K. to his B's 3d.21. B. to Q. Kt's 4th.
22. P. to K. Kt's 3d.22. B. to Q's 6th.
23. Kt. to Q's 2d.23. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th.
24. K. R. to K's sq.24. P. to K. R's 3d.
25. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.25. R. to Q. B's sq.
26. B. to Q. Kt's 2d.26. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
27. P. to K. R's 5th.27. P. takes B. P.
28. P. takes P.28. R. to K. Kt's sq.
29. R. to K. R's sq.29. K. to B's 2d.
30. R. to K. R's 3d.30. K. to his 3d.
31. R. to Q. B's sq.31. R. to K. Kt's 2d.
32. P. to Q. B's 4th.32. P. takes P.
33. Kt. takes P.33. B. to K's 5th. (ch.)
34. K. to his 2d.34. B. to K. Kt's 7th.
35. R. to K. Kt's 3d.35. B. to K's 5th.
36. P. to Q. R's 3d.36. Q. R. to K. Kt's sq.
37. Q. R. to K. Kt's sq.37. B. to K. R's 5th.
38. R. to K. R's 3d.38. B. to K. B's 7th.
39. R. to Q. B's sq.39. Q. B. to K. Kt's 7th.
40. R. to Q's 3d.40. B. to K. R's 5th.
41. Kt. to Q's 6th.41. Kt. to K. B's 7th.
42. K. R. to Q. B's 3d.42. Kt. to K's 5th.
43. P. to Q's 5th. (ch.)43. K. takes P.
44. R. to Q's 3d. (ch.)44. K. to K's 3d.
45. Kt. takes Kt.45. P. takes Kt.
46. R. to Q's 6th. (ch.)46. K. to B's 4th.
47. P. to K's 6th.47. B. to K. B's 6th. (ch.)
48. K. to his 3d.48. R. to K. Kt's 7th.
49. R. to Q. B's 5th. (ch.)49. K. to K. Kt's 5th.
50. R. to Q's 2d.50. R. takes R.
51. K. takes R.51. K. takes K. B. P.
52. B. to K's 5th. (ch.)52. K. to K. Kt's 5th.
53. K. to his 3d.53. B. to K. Kt's 4th. (ch.)
54. K. to Q's 4th.54. P. to K's 6th.
55. R. to Q. B's sq.55. R. to Q's sq. (ch.)
56. K. to Q. B's 3d.56. R. to Q. B's sq. (ch.)
And Black wins.


[TABLE OF CONTENTS]

[116]

CHAPTER III.

THE KING'S BISHOP'S OPENING.

The Two Kings' Bishops' Game

GAME THE FIRST.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. P. to Q. B's 3d. 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. P. to Q's 4th. 4. P. takes P.
 5. P. to K's 5th. 5. P. to Q's 4th.
 6. P. takes Kt. 6. P. takes B.
 7. P. takes K. Kt. P. 7. R. to K. Kt's sq.
 8. Q. to K. R's 5th. 8. Q. to K's 2d. (ch.)
 9. K. to Q's sq. 9. R. takes P.
10. K. Kt. to B's 3d.10. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
11. K. R. to K's sq.11. Q. B. to K's 3d.
12. R. takes B.12. Q. takes R.
13. Q. takes B.13. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.
14. Q. to her Kt's 5th.14. R. takes K. Kt. P.
I prefer your game.


GAME THE SECOND.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. P. to Q. B's 3d. 3. Q. to K's 2d.
 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 4. P. to Q's 3d. (best)
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. P. takes P.
 6. Castles 6. P. takes Q. B. P.
 7. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 7. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 8. Q. Kt. takes P. 8. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 9. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th. 9. Kt. takes Kt.
10. P. takes Kt.10. Castles.
11. Q. B. to Q. Kt's 2d.11. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
12. K. R. to K's sq.12. Q. to her sq.
Your attack is hardly an equivalent for his extra Pawn.


[117]

GAME THE THIRD.
The Italians' Defence.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
3. P. to Q. B's 3d.3. Q. to K. Kt's 4th.
4. Q. to K. B's 3d.4. Q. to K. Kt's 3d. (best).
5. K. Kt. to K's 2d.5. P. to Q's 3d.
6. P. to Q's 4th.6. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
7. P. takes P.7. P. takes P.
8. K. Kt. to his 3d.8. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
9 P. to K. R's 3d.
The game is equal.


GAME THE FOURTH.
Lewis's Counter Gambit.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. P. to Q. B's 3d. 3. P. to Q's 4th.
 4. B. takes P. 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. Q. to K. B's 3d. 5. Castles.
 6. P. to Q's 4th. 6. P. takes P.
 7. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th. 7. P. takes P.
 8. Q. Kt. takes P. 8. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.
 9. Castles. 9. P. to Q. B's 3d.
10. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.10. Q. to K's 2d.
The game is even.


[118]

GAME THE FIFTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. P. to Q. B's 3d. 3. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. P. to Q's 4th. 4. B. to Q. Kt's 3d. (best)
 5. K. Kt. to K's 2d. 5. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 6. Q. to her 3d. 6. Castles.
 7. P. to K. B's 4th. 7. P. takes Q. P.
 8. P. to K's 5th. 8. P. to Q's 4th.
 9. B. to Q. Kt's 3d. 9. K. Kt. to K's 5th.
10. Q. B. P. takes P.10. P. to K. B's 4th.
11. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.11. Q. B. to K's 3d.
And the game is even.


GAME THE SIXTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to Q's 3d.
 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. P. takes P.
 6. P. takes P. 6. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.)
 7. B. to Q's 2d. 7. B. takes B. (ch.)
 8. Q. Kt. takes B. 8. P. to Q's 4th.
 9. P. takes P. 9. Kt. takes P.
10. Q. to her Kt's 3d.10. P. to Q. B's 3d.
11. Castles.11. Castles.
You have the move, and your Pieces are in better play.


GAME THE SEVENTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
3. Q. to K. B's 3d.3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
4. P. to K. Kt's 4th.4. P. to Q's 4th.
5. K. B. takes Q. P.5. Q. B. takes P.
6. Q. to Q. Kt's 3d.6. K. Kt. takes K. B.
7. P. takes Kt.7. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
8. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.8. Q. to K. B's 3d.
Black has the better game.


[119]

GAME THE EIGHTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
3. Q. to K. Kt's 4th.3. Q. to K. B's 3d.
4. P. to Q's 4th.4. B. takes P.
5. K. Kt. to B's 3d.5. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
6. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.6. P. to Q's 3d.
7. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.7. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.
8. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.8. P. to K. R's 3d.
Black has the advantage.


GAME THE NINTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
3. Q. to K. R's 5th.3. Q. to K's 2d.
4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.4. P. to Q's 3d.
5. K. Kt. to his 5th.5. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
6. Q. takes K. B. P. (ch.) (best)6. Q. takes Q.
7. B. takes Q. (ch.)7. K. to his 2d.
8. B. to Q. B's 4th.8. P. to K. R's 3d.
9. Kt. to K. B's 3d.9. Kt. takes K. P.
You have no advantage.


GAME THE TENTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
3. P. to Q's 4th.3. B. takes P.
4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.4. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
5. P. to Q. B's 3d.5. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
6. K. Kt. to his 5th.6. K. Kt. to R's 3d.
7. Q. to K. R's 5th.7. Castles.
Black maintains his Pawn.


[120]

GAME THE ELEVENTH.
McDonnell's Double Gambit.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 3. B. takes Kt. P.
 4. P. to K. B's 4th. 4. P. to Q's 4th.
 5. P. takes Q. P. 5. P. to K's 5th.
 6. K. Kt. to K's 2d. 6. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 7. Castles. 7. Castles.
 8. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 8. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 9. P. takes P. 9. Q. Kt. takes P.
10. K. to R's sq.10. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
Your game is inferior to his.


GAME THE TWELFTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th
 3. P. to K. B's 4th. 3. B. takes K. Kt.
 4. Q. to K. R's 5th. 4. Q. to K's 2d.
 5. R. takes B. 5. P. to Q's 3d.
 6. P to K. B's 5th. 6. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 7. Q. to K. Kt's 5th. 7. K. Kt. takes K. P.
 8. Q. takes K. Kt. P. 8. Q. to K. B's 3d.
 9. K. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.) 9. K. to his 2d.
10. Q. takes Q. (ch.)10. Kt. takes Q.
11. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.11. Q. B. takes P.
The game is in Black's favor.


[121]

GAME THE THIRTEENTH.
The Lopez Gambit

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. Q. to K's 2d. 3. P. to Q's 3d.
 4. P. to K. B's 4th. 4. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
 5. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. Q. to K's 2d.
 6. P. to Q's 3d. 6. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
 7. P. takes P. 7. P. takes P.
 8. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th. 8. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.
 9. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d. 9. Castles on Q's side.
10. Castles on Q's side.
The positions are equal.


GAME THE FOURTEENTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. Q. to K's 2d. 3. Q. to K's 2d.
 4. P. to K. B's 4th. 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. P. to Q's 3d.
 6. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 6. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 7. P. to Q's 3d. 7. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
 8. P. to K. B's 5th. 8. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.
 9. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th. 9. P. to K. R's 3d.
10. Q. B. to K. R's 4th.10. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
The game is quite even.


GAME THE FIFTEENTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. Q. to K's 2d. 3. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d
 5. P to K. B's 4th. 5. B. takes K. Kt.
 6. R. takes B. 6. Castles.
 7. P. to Q's 3d. 7. P. to Q's 4th.
 8. K. B. takes Q. P. 8. K. Kt. takes B.
 9. P. takes Kt. 9. P. takes K. B. P.
10. Q. B. takes P.10. R. to K's sq.
11. B. to K's 3d.11. Kt. to K's 4th.
12. P. to K. R's 3d.12. B. to K. B's 4th.
13. P. to Q's 4th.13. B. to Q's 6th.

And by afterwards moving the Kt. to Q. B's 5th, Black must win at least a Piece.

[122]

Variation,
Beginning at White's 4th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
3. Q. to K's 2d.3. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
4. K. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.)4. K. takes B.
5. Q. to her B's 4th. (ch.)5. P. to Q's 4th.
6. Q. takes B.6. P. takes K. P.
7. Q. to her B's 4th. (ch.)7. Q. B. to K's 3d.
8. Q. takes P.8. K. Kt. to B's 3d
And you have an inferior game.


GAMES

ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE PRECEDING ANALYSES.

Game I.—Played some years since between Messrs. Popert and Staunton.

Go to PGN_34

 WHITE.  (Mr. S.)  BLACK.  (Mr. P.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. P. to Q. B's 3d. 3. P. to Q's 3d.[A]
 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.[B] 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. P. takes P.
 6. P takes P. 6. B. checks.
 7. B. to Q's 2d. 7. B. takes B. (ch.)
 8. Q. Kt. takes B. 8. Castles.[C]
 9. B. to Q's 3d. 9. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
10. P. to Q. R's 3d.10. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
11. Q. to Q. B's 2d.11. P. to K. R's 3d.
12. Q. R. to Q. B's sq.12. P. to Q's 4th.
13. P. to K's 5th.13. B. takes Kt.
14. Kt. takes B.14. Kt. to K. R's 4th.
15. P. to K. Kt's 3d.15. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
16. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.16. Q. to Q's 2d.[D]
17. Q. to Q's 2d.17. K. to R's 2d.
18. Castles.18. Q. R. to K's sq.
19. Q. R. to B's 3d.19. Kt. to Q's sq.
20. Kt. to K. R's 4th.20. P. to Q. B's 3d.
21. P. to K. B's 4th.21. P. to K. B's 4th.
22. P. to K. Kt's 4th.22. Kt. to K. Kt's 2d.
23. P. takes B. P.23. K. Kt. takes P.
24. Kt. takes Kt.24. P. takes Kt.
25. K. to R's sq.25. K. R. to K. Kt's sq.
26. Q. R. to Q. B's sq.26. Q. to K. B's 2d.
27. Q. to Q. B's 2d.27. Q. R. to K. B's sq.
28. K. R. to K. Kt's sq.28. Kt. to K's 3d.
29. R. takes R.29. K. takes R.
30. R. to K. Kt's sq. (ch.)30. K. to R's sq.
31. Q. to K. B's 2d.31. Q. to K. R's 4th.[E]
32. B. to K's 2d.32. Q. to K. B's 2d.
33. Q. to K. R's 4th.33. Q. to K. R's 2d.
34. B. to K. R's 5th.34. Kt. takes Q. P.
35. R. to K. Kt's 3d.35. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.
36. B. to K. Kt's 6th.[F]36. Q. to K. Kt's 2d.
37. B. to K. B's 7th.37. R. takes B.[G]
38. R. takes Q.38. K. takes R.
39. K. to Kt's 2d, and wins.

[123]

[A] Not so good a move as K. Kt. to B's 3d, or Q. to K. Kt's 4th.

[B] P. to Q's 4th would perhaps have been stronger play.

[C] P. to Q's 4th is a better move at this point.

[D] Intending, if the Q. Kt. P. should be played on his Kt., to move Q. to K. Kt's 5th.

[E] A lost move.

[F] It would have been more decisive if played to K. B's 7th at once.

[G] If the Q. takes B., mate follows in three moves.



Game II.—Between two Amateurs.

Go to PGN_35

 WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. P. to Q. B's 3d. 3. Q. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. Q. to K. B's 3d. 4. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.
 5. K. Kt. to K's 2d. 5. P. to Q's 3d.
 6. P. to Q's 4th. 6. P. takes P.
 7. P. takes P. 7. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 8. P. to K's 5th. 8. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
 9. P. to K's 6th. 9. P. to K. B's 3d.
10. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.10. Castles.
11. K. Kt to K. B's 4th.11. Q. to K's sq.
12. Q. B. to K's 3d.12. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
13. Q. R. to Q's sq.13. K. to R's sq.
14. P. to K. R's 4th.14. Q. Kt. to Q's sq.
15. P. to K. R's 5th.15. P. to K. B's 4th.
16. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th.16. Q. B. takes P.
17. Kt. takes Kt.17. Q. takes Kt.
18. Kt. to K. Kt's 6th. (ch.)18. P. takes Kt.
19. P. takes P. (dis. ch.)
And White gives checkmate in three moves.


[124]

Game III.—The Lopez Gambit.—Between Messrs. De la Bourdonnais and McDonnell.

Go to PGN_36

 WHITE.  (M. De la B.)  BLACK.  (Mr. McD.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. Q. to K's 2d. 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. P. to Q's 3d. 4. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.
 6. P. to K. B's 4th. 6. P. takes P.[A]
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. K. B. to Kt's 3d.
 8. Q. B. takes P. 8. P. to Q's 3d.
 9. K. B. to Q's 3d. 9. Q. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d.
10. Q. B. to K's 3d.10. Castles.
11. P. to K. R's 3d.11. K. R. to K's sq.
12. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.12. Q. to K's 2d.
13. Castles on Q's side.13. P. to Q. B's 4th.
14. K. to Kt's sq.14. P. takes P.
15. P. takes P.15. P. to Q. R's 4th.
16. K. Kt. to B's 3d.16. Q. B. to Q's 2d.
17. P. to K. Kt's 4th.17. P. to K. R's 3d.
18. Q. R. to K. Kt's sq.18. P. to Q. R's 5th.
19. P. to K. Kt's 5th.19. P. takes P.
20. B. takes P.20. P. to Q. R's 6th.
21. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.21. Q. B. to his 3d.
22. Q. R. to K. Kt's 4th.22. K. B. to Q. R's 4th.
23. P. to K. R's 4th.23. B. takes Q. Kt.
24. Kt. takes B.24. Q. R. to his 4th.
25. P. to K. R's 5th.25. R. takes B.
26. R. takes R.26. Kt. to K. B's 5th.
27. Q. to K. B's 3d.27. Kt. takes B.
28. P. to Q's 5th.28. Kt. takes Q. P.
29. K. R. to K. Kt's sq.[B]29. Kt. to B's 6th. (ch.)
30. K. to R's sq.30. B. takes K. P.
31. R. takes K. Kt. P. (ch.)31. K. to R's sq.
32. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.32. B. to K. Kt's 3d.
33. K. R. P. takes B.33. Q. to K's 8th. (ch.)
34. R. takes Q.[C]34. R. takes R. (ch.)
35. Q. takes R.35. Kt. takes Q.
36. R. to R's 7th. (ch.)36. K. to Kt's sq.
37. P. takes K. B. P. (ch.)37. K. takes R.
38. P. one, becoming a Queen.38. Kt. mates.

[A] In this opening it is not advisable for the second player to take the gambit P. with his K. P.

[B] This portion of the game is full of interest and instruction, and is remarkably well played.

[C] White loses the game by this move.



[125]

Game IV.—The Lopez Gambit.

Go to PGN_37

 WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. Q. to K's 2d. 3. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.) 4. K. takes B.
 5. Q. to her B's 4th. (ch.) 5. P. to Q's 4th.
 6. Q. takes B. 6. P. takes P.
 7. Q. to her B's 4th. (ch.) 7. Q. B. to K's 3d.
 8. Q. takes P. 8. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 9. Q. to K. R's 4th. 9. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th.
10. Q. Kt. to R's 3d.10. P. to K's 5th.
11. P. to Q. B's 3d.11. P. to K. Kt's 4th.[A]
12. Q. takes K. Kt. P.12. K. R. to K. Kt's sq.
13. Q. to K's 3d.13. Q. Kt. to K. B's 4th.
14. Q. to K's 2d.14. R. takes K. Kt. P.
15. Q. Kt. to B's 2d.15. Q. to her 3d.
16. Q. Kt. to K's 3d.16. Kt. takes Kt.
17. Q. P. takes Kt.17. Q. R. to K. Kt's sq.
18. Q. to K. B's sq.18. Q. R. to Q's sq.
19. Q. to K's 2d.19. Kt. to his 5th.
20. Kt. to R's 3d.20. Kt. to K's 4th.
21. Kt. to K. B's 4th.21. Kt. to K. B's 6th. (ch.)
22. K. to his B's sq.
And Black can checkmate in six moves.

[A] The game from this point forward is admirably conducted by Black.



Game V.—Between Messrs. Cochrane and Staunton.

Go to PGN_38

 WHITE.  (Mr. S.)  BLACK.  (Mr. C.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.[A] 4. B. takes Q. Kt. P.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. B. to Q. R's 4th.
 6. Castles. 6. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. P. takes Q. P.
 8 . K. Kt. takes P. 8. Kt. takes Kt.
 9. P. takes Kt. 9. P. to Q's 3d.
10. P. to Q. R's 4th.10. P. to Q. B's 3d.
11. P. to Q. R's 5th.11. K. B. to Q. B's 2d.[B]
12. Q. to her Kt's 3d.12. Q. to K's 2d.
13. Q. B. to Q. R's 3d.13. Q. to K. B's 3d.
14. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.14. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.
15. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.15. K. Kt. to K. R's 3d.
16. P. to K's 5th.16. P. to Q's 4th.
17. K. B. to Q's 3d.17. Kt. to K. B's 4th
18. Q. to her Kt's 4th.18. K. B. to Q's sq.
19. Q. to her Kt's sq.19. Q. to K. R's 4th.
20. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d.20. Kt. takes Kt.
21. K. B. P. takes Kt.21. K. B. takes Q. R. P.
22. K. B. to K. B's 5th.22. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
23. Q. to her Kt's 4th.23. Q. to K. Kt's 4th.
24. K. B. takes Q. B.24. Q. R. takes B.
25. P. to K's 6th.25. P. takes P.
White announced mate in eight moves.

[A] We have now the same position brought about which occurs in the Evans Gambit.

[B] If he had taken the P., Black, by taking the K. B. P. with his B., checking, and when the K. took the B., playing Q. to K. R's 5th (ch.), would have gained a more valuable P. in return, and have deprived his opponent of the privilege of castling.



[126]

Game VI.—Between Messrs. Walker and Daniels.

Go to PGN_39

 WHITE.  (Mr. W.)  BLACK.  (Mr. D.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. P. to Q. B's 3d. 3. P. to Q's 4th.
 4. B. takes Q. P. 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. Q. to her Kt's 3d. 5. Castles.
 6. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 6. P. to Q. B's 3d.[A]
 7. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.)[B] 7. R. takes B.
 8. Kt. takes K. P. 8. Q. to K's 2d.
 9. Q. takes R. (ch.) 9. Q. takes Q.
10. Kt. takes Q.10. K. takes Kt.
11. P. to Q's 4th.11. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
12. P. to K. B's 3d.12. Q. B. to K's 3d.
13. Q. B. to K's 3d.13. Q. Kt. to R's 3d.
14. K. to B's 2d.14. Q. Kt. to B's 2d.
15. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.15. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
16. P. to K. Kt's 4th.16. K. to Kt's 2d.
17. P. to K. R's 4th.17. R. to K's sq.
18. P. to K. R's 5th.18. Q. B. to K. B's 2d.
19. P. takes P.19. Q. B. takes P.
20. Q. R. to K. Kt's sq.20. Q. Kt. to K's 3d.
21. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 4th.21. B. to Q. B's 2d.
22. P. to K's 5th.22. K. Kt. to Q's 4th.
23. B. to K. R's 6th. (ch.)23. K. to B's 2d.
24. K. to Kt's 3d.24. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.
25. Kt. to K's 3d.25. Kt. takes Kt.
26. B. takes Kt.26. P. to Q. B's 4th.
27. P. to K. B's 4th.27. P. takes P.
28. P. takes P.28. Q. B. to Q's 6th.
29. P. to K. B's 5th.
Black resigns.

[A] This is not advisable. It would be better to take B. with Kt.

[B] The notion of this sacrifice originated with Messrs. Henderson and Williams, of Bristol, during an examination of the present opening.



[127]

The King's Knight's Defence
in King's Bishop's Opening


GAME THE FIRST.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. takes P.
 4. P. to K's 5th. 4 P. to Q's 4th.
 5. B. to Q. Kt's 3d. 5. Kt. to K's 5th.
 6. K. Kt. to K's 2d. 6. P. to Q. B's 4th.
 7. P. to K. B's 3d. 7. Kt. to K. Kt's 4th.
 8. Kt. to K. B's 4th. 8. P. to Q. B's 5th.
 9. B. to R's 4th. (ch.) 9. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
10. B. takes Kt. (ch.)10. P. takes B.
11. Q. takes doubled P11. Kt. to K's 3d.
12. Kt. takes Kt.12. K. B. P. takes Kt.
13. Castles.13. P. to Q. B's 4th.
14. Q. to K. B's 2d.
Black has the advantage.


GAME THE SECOND.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
3. P. to Q's 3d.3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.4. P. to Q's 3d.
5. P. to Q. B's 3d.5. Castles.
6. P. to Q. R's 4th.6. P. to Q. R's 4th.
The game is even.


[128]

GAME THE THIRD.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
3. P. to K. B's 4th.3. P. to Q's 4th.
4. P. takes Q. P.4. P. takes B. P.
5. P. to Q's 4th.5. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
6. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
There is no advantage on either side.


GAME THE FOURTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. Kt. takes K. P.
 4. P. to Q's 3d. 4. Kt. to Q's 3d.
 5. Kt. takes K. P. 5. Kt. takes B.
 6. Kt. takes Kt. 6. P. to Q's 4th.
 7. Kt. to K's 5th. 7. K. B. to Q's 3d.
 8. P. to Q's 4th. 8. Castles.
 9. Castles. 9. P. to K. B's 3d.
10. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
Neither party can boast of advantage.


Counter Gambit in the King's Bishop's Opening
GAME THE FIRST.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. P. to K. B's 4th.

You have now the choice of refusing or accepting the gambit; the former is the more judicious mode of operating, [129]and the consequences arising from it will be shown in this game, while the result of your accepting the gambit shall be considered in the next.

 3. P. to Q's 3d. 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. P. to K. B's 4th. 4. K. P. takes P.
 5. Q. B. takes P. 5. P. takes K. P.
 6. Q. P. takes P. 6. Q. to K's 2d.
 7. P. to K's 5th. 7. P. to Q's 3d.
 8. Q. to K's 2d. 8. P. takes P.
 9. B. takes P. 9. P. to Q. B's 3d.
10. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
You have a better developed opening.


Variation I.
Beginning at White's 3d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.2. P. to K. B's 4th.
3. P. to Q's 4th.3. P. takes Q. P. (best)
4. Q. takes P.4. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
5. Q. to K's 3d.5. P. takes P.
6. Q. takes P. (ch.)6. Q. to K's 2d.
The game is even.


Variation II.
Beginning also at White's 3d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. P. to K. B's 4th.
 3. B. takes K. Kt. 3. R. takes B.
 4. P. takes P. 4. P. to Q's 4th.
 5. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.) 5. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
 6. P. takes P. 6. R. takes P.
 7. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 7. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 8. Q. takes K. R. P. 8. Q. to K. B's 3d.
 9. P. to Q's 3d. 9. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
10. B. to K's 3d.10. B. takes B.
11. P. takes B.11. R. takes K. Kt. P.
The positions are equal.


[130]

GAME THE SECOND.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. P. to K. B's 4th.
 3. P. takes P. 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. P. to Q's 4th. 4. P. takes P.
 5. Q. takes P. 5. P. to Q's 4th.
 6. K. B. to Q's 3d. 6. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 7. Q. to K's 3d. (ch.) 7. K. to B's 2d.
 8. K. Kt. to K's 2d. 8. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.)
 9. P. to Q. B's 3d. 9. R. to K's sq.
10. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.10. K. B. to Q's 3d.
His game is better developed.


The Queen's Bishop's Pawn's Defence
in the King's Bishop's Opening.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 3. Q. to K's 2d. 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. P. to K. B's 4th. 4. P. to Q's 3d.
 5. P. takes P. 5. P. takes P.
 6. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 6. K. B. to Q's 3d.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. P. takes P.
 8. P. to K's 5th. 8. Castles.
 9. Castles. 9. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
10. Q. to her 3d.10. Kt. to Q's 4th.
11. Kt. to his 5th.11. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
12. Kt. to K's 4th.12. B. to K's 2d.
13. B. takes Kt.13. P. takes B.
14. Kt. to B's 6th. (ch.)14. B. takes Kt.
15. P. takes B.
You have a fine game.


Variation,
Beginning at White's 3d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.2. P. to Q. B's 3d.
3. P. to Q's 4th.3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
4. P. takes K. P.4. Q. to Q. R's 4th. (ch.)
5. P. to Q. B's 3d.5. Q. takes K. P.
6. B. to Q's 3d.6. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
7. P. to K. B's 4th.7. Q. to K's 2d.
8. P. to K's 5th.
The game is in your favor.


[131]

GAMES

ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE PRECEDING ANALYSES.

Game I.—Between Messrs. Stanley and Rousseau.

Go to PGN_40

 WHITE.  (Mr. S.)  BLACK.  (Mr. R.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 4. P. to Q's 3d.
 5. P. to K. R's 3d. 5. Castles.
 6. P. to Q's 3d. 6. Q. B. to K's 3d.
 7. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d. 7. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 8. Q. Kt. to K's 2d. 8. Q. to K's 2d.
 9. Q. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d. 9. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th.
10. Kt. takes Kt.10. B. takes Kt.
11. P. to Q. B's 3d.[A]11. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
12. Castles.12. P. to Q's 4th.[B]
13. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.13. P. to Q. B's 3d.
14. Kt. to K. R's 5th.14. P. takes K. P.
15. P. takes P.15. B. takes B.
16. Q. to K. B's 3d.[C]16. Q. B. to his 5th.
17. B. takes Kt.17. Q. to K's 3d.
18. Kt. takes K. Kt. P18. Q. B. to K's 7th.
19. Kt. takes Q.19. B. takes Q.
20. Kt. takes R.
Black surrenders.

[A] White gains a move by this exchange of Pieces.

[B] P. to K. R's 3d would have been better play.

[C] This is very finely played, and is an example to young players of the importance of gaining time at chess. Had White paused in his attack to recover the lost Bishop, the adversary might have succeeded in dislodging one or other of the Pieces by which he is beleaguered, or in bringing his own forces to the rescue, and then have ultimately retrieved the game.



[132]

Game II.—Between Messrs. Horwitz and Schulten.

Go to PGN_41

 WHITE.  (Mr. S.)  BLACK.  (Mr. H.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.
 4. B. takes Kt. P. 4. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 5. P. to Q's 3d. 5. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 6. B. to Q. B's 4th. 6. Q. to her Kt's 3d.
 7. Q. to K's 2d. 7. P. to Q's 4th.
 8. P. takes P. 8. Castles.
 9. Q. Kt. to K's 4th. 9. Kt. takes Kt.
10. P. takes Kt.10. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.)[A]
11. Q. takes B.11. Q. to Kt's 5th. (ch.)
12. Q. B. to Q's 2d.12. Q. takes K. B.
13. Q. to K. B's 3d.13. P. to K. B's 4th.
14. P. takes K. B. P.14. B. takes P.
15. Q. to her Kt's 3d.
And Black mated by force in three moves.[B]

[A] Black plays capitally now to the end.

[B] It is rarely in actual play one sees so pretty a mate.



Game III.—Between Dr. Bledow and Von Bilguer.

Go to PGN_42

 WHITE.  (Dr. B.)  BLACK.  (Von B.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. P. to K. B's 4th.
 3. P. to Q's 3d. 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 4. P. takes K. P.
 5. P. takes P. 5. Kt. takes P.
 6. Q. to her 5th. 6. Kt. to Q's 3d.
 7. Kt. takes K. P. 7. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 8. Q. to K. B's 7th. (ch.)[A]  8. Kt. takes Q.
 9. B. takes Kt. (ch.) 9. K. to his 2d.
10. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th. (ch.)10. K. to Q's 3d.
11. B. takes Q.11. K. takes Kt.
12. P. to K. B's 4th. (ch.)12. K. to his B's 4th.
13. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.13. K. B. checks.
14. P. to Q. B's 3d.14. K. R. to B's sq.
15. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.15. P. to K. R's 3d.
16. K. B. to Q. B's 2d. (ch.)16. K. to Kt's 5th.
17. K. B. to Q's sq. (ch.)17. K. to B's 4th.
18. P. to K. Kt's 4th. (ch.)18. K. to Kt's 3d.
19. B. to Q. B's 2d. (ch.)19. K. to B's 2d.
20. Q. B. to K. R's 4th.20. K. B. to K's 2d.
21. Q. B. to K. Kt's 3d.21. P. to Q's 4th.
22. P. to K. B's 5th.22. Kt. to Q's 2d.
23. Kt. to Q's 2d.23. K. B. to his 3d.
24. Kt. to K. B's 3d.24. R. to K's sq. (ch.)
25. K. to his B's 2d.25. Kt. to Q. B's 4th.
26. K. R. to K's sq.26. Q. B. to Q's 2d.
27. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.27. Kt. to K's 5th. (ch.)
28. R. takes Kt.[B]28. P. takes R.
29. B. to Q. Kt's 3d. (ch.)29. K. to B's sq.
30. B. to Q's 6th. (ch.)30. B. to K's 2d.
31. Kt. to K's 5th.31. P. to K. Kt's 4th.[C]
32. P. to K. B's 6th.[D]32. P. to K's 6th. (ch.)
33. K. to Kt's sq.
Black resigns.

[A] Transcriber's Note: Original text omitted the "(ch.)".

[B] The terminating moves are admirably played by Dr. Bledow.

[C] It is quite evident that on taking the B., mate would have followed next move.

[D] Beautifully played.



[133]

Game IV.—Played between two Amateurs.

Go to PGN_43

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. B. to Q. B's 4th. 2. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 3. Q. to K's 2d. 3. Q. to Q. B's 2d.
 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. P. to K. B's 4th. 5. P. to Q's 3d.
 6. P. to K. B's 5th. 6. P. to Q's 4th.
 7. P. takes P. 7. P. takes P.
 8. B. checks. 8. B. to Q's 2d.
 9. B. takes B. (ch.) 9. Q. Kt. takes B.
10. P. to Q's 4th.10. P. to K's 5th.
11. K. Kt. to R's 3d.11. Castles.
12. Castles.12. B. to Q's 3d.
13. Kt. to K. B's 4th.13. P. to K. R's 3d.
14. Q. to K. B's 2d.14. K. Kt. to his 5th.
15. Q. to K's 2d.15. P. to K. R's 4th.
16. Kt. takes Q. P.16. B. takes K. R. P. (ch.)
17. K. to R's sq.17. Q. to her 3d.
18. Q. takes K. P.18. K. R. to K's sq.
19. Q. to K. B's 3d.19. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
20. B. to K. Kt's 5th.20. P. to K. B's 3d.
21. B. to Q's 2d.21. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
22. Q. Kt. to R's 3d.22. P. to Q. R's 4th.
23. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 4th.23. Q. to her B's 3d.
24. Q. Kt. takes P.24. Q. to Kt's 4th.
25. P. to Q. B's 4th.25. Q. to R's 5th.
26. K. Kt. to Q. Kt's 6th. (ch.)26. Kt. takes Kt.
27. Q. takes P.
Mate.


[134]

Queen's Bishop's Pawn's Opening.

GAME THE FIRST.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. P. to Q. B's 3d.2. P. to Q's 4th. (best)
3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.3. P. takes K. P.
4. Kt. takes K. P.4. K. B. to Q's 3d.
5. Kt. to Q. B's 4th.5. Q. B. to K's 3d.
6. P. to Q's 4th.6. P. takes P. in passing.
7. B. takes P.
The positions are equal.


Variation,
Beginning at Black's 3d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to Q. B's 3d. 2. P. to Q's 4th. (best.)
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. P. to Q's 4th. 4. Kt. takes P.
 5. Kt. takes P. 5. K. B. to Q's 3d.
 6. K. Kt. to Q's 3d. 6. P. to Q. B's 4th.
 7. P. takes P. 7. Kt. takes P.
 8. Q. B. to K's 3d. 8. Kt. takes Kt. (ch.)
 9. B. takes Kt. 9. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
10. Castles.10. Castles.
Neither party has the advantage.


GAME THE SECOND.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. P. to Q. B's 3d.2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
3. P. to Q's 4th.3. K. Kt. takes K. P.
4. Q. P. takes P.4. P. to Q's 4th. (best)
5. Q. B. to K's 3d.
The game is quite even.


[135]

GAMES

ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE QUEEN'S BISHOP'S PAWN'S OPENING.

Game I.—Between Captain Evans and an Amateur.

Go to PGN_44

 WHITE.  (Capt. E.)  BLACK.  (Mr. P.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to Q. B's 3d. 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. takes P.
 4. P. to K's 5th. 4. Kt. to K's 5th.
 5. Q. to K's 2d. 5. Kt. to his 4th.
 6. P. takes P. 6. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.)
 7. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 7. Q. Kt to B's 3d.
 8. Q. to her 3d. 8. P. to Q's 4th.
 9. P. to K. B's 4th. 9. Kt. to K's 5th.
10. K. Kt. to B's 3d.10. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.
11. Q. to K's 3d.11. Castles.
12. P. to Q. R's 3d.12. B. to Q. R's 4th.
13. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.13. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
14. Q. B. to Kt's 2d.14. Q. B. to Kt's 5th.
15. Q. Kt. to Q. R's 4th.15. B. takes K. Kt.
16. Q. Kt. takes B.16. B. takes K. Kt. P.
17. B. takes B.17. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
18. K. to his 2d.18. Q. R. P. takes Kt.
19. B. takes Kt.19. P. takes B.
20. Q. takes P.20. Q. to Kt's 5th. (ch.)
21. Q. to K. B's 3d.21. Q. to K. B's 4th.
22. Q. R. to Q. B's sq.22. Q. Kt. takes Q. Kt. P.
23. K. R. to K. Kt's sq.[A]23. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
24. K. R. to Kt's 5th.24. Q. to her 2d.
25. P. to Q's 5th.25. Kt. to K's 2d.
26. K. R. takes K. Kt. P. (ch.)26. K. to R's sq.
27. Q. to her 3d.27. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d.
28. R. takes Kt.28. Q. R. to K's sq.
28. K. to B's 2d.[B]29. R. to K's 3d.
30. R. to K. Kt's 3d.30. R. to Q's sq.
31. P. takes R.31. Q. to K's 2d.[C]
32. P. takes P.
Black surrenders.

[A] Black played ingeniously in offering to give up the Kt. If White had taken it, he must have been subjected to an embarrassing attack for some little time.

[B] Had he played on the P. (dis. ch.), he could not take the Q. until his King was removed.

[C] Taking the Q. would have been fatal to him.



Game II.—Between Messrs. Cochrane and Staunton.

Go to PGN_45

 WHITE.  (Mr. S.)  BLACK.  (Mr. C.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to Q. B's 3d. 2. P. to Q's 4th.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. K. Kt. takes P. 4. K. Kt. takes P.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. K. B. to Q's 3d.
 6. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d. 6. Castles.
 7. Q. Kt. takes K. Kt. 7. P. takes Kt.
 8. Q. B. to K. B's 4th. 8. B. takes Kt.
 9. Q. B. takes B. 9. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
10. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.10. Q. B. to K's 3d.
11. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th.11. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.
12. Castles.12. P. to Q. B's 3d.
13. K. B. to Q. R's 4th.13. Q. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d.
14. Q. B. to K. Kt's 3d.14. P. to K. B's 4th.
15. P. to K. B's 4th.15. P. takes P. in passing.
16. R. takes P.16. P. to K. B's 5th.
17. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.[A]17. Q. to her 3d.
18. Q. B. to K. B's 2d.18. K. to R's sq.
19. K. B. takes B.19. Q. takes B.
20. Q. to her 3d.20. Q. R. to K's sq.
21. K. R. to K. R's 3d.21. Q. to K. B's 4th.
22. Q. to K. B's 3d.22. Q. R. to K's 5th.
23. K. R. to his 5th.23. Q. to K's 3d.
24. P. to Q. B's 4th.24. K. R. to K's sq.
25. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.25. Q. to K. B's 3d.
26. Q. R. to K. B's sq.26. Q. R. to K's 7th.
27. P. to Q. R's 4th.27. Q. R. to his 7th.
28. P. to Q's 5th.28. Q. R. to his 8th.
29. Q. B. takes Q. R. P.[B]29. K. R. to K's 8th.
30. R. takes R.30. R. takes R. (ch.)
31. K. to B's 2d.31. Q. to her R's 8th.[C]
32. Q. to her 3d.32. R. to K. Kt's 8th.
33. Q. to K's 2d.33. Kt. to K's 2d.
34. P. to Q's 6th.
And wins.

[A] But for this move of resource, Black would evidently have gained "the exchange," at least.

[B] An important outlet for his King.

[C] Black has now a very menacing position.



[136]

Game III.—Between Capt. Evans and M. St. Amant.

Go to PGN_46

 WHITE.  (Capt. E.)  BLACK.  (M. St. A.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to Q. B's 3d. 2. P. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. Q. B. P. takes P.
 6. K. Kt. to Kt's 5th.[A] 6. P. to Q's 4th.
 7. P. takes P. 7. K. Kt. takes P.
 8. K. Kt. takes K. B. P. 8. K. takes Kt.
 9. Q. to K. B's 3d. (ch.) 9. K. to his 3d.
10. Castles.10. Q. Kt. to R's 4th.
11. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.11. Q. to her 3d.
12. P. to K. Kt's 4th.12. Q. to her 2d.
13. K. B. to Q's 3d.13. Q. to K. B's 2d.
14. B. to K. B's 5th. (ch.)[B]14. K. to Q's 3d.
15. P. takes Q. P.15. Q. B. takes B.
16. P. takes P. (ch.)16. K. takes P.
17. P. takes B.17. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
18. K. R. to K's sq. (ch.)18. K. to Q's 3d.
19. R. to K's 6th. (ch.)19. K. to Q. B's 4th.
20. Q. B. to K's 3d. (ch.)20. K. Kt. takes B.
21. Q. takes K. Kt. (ch.)21. K. to Kt's 4th.
22. Q. to her 3d. (ch.)22. K. to Kt's 3d.
23. Q. to her Kt's 3d. (ch.)23. K. to B's 2d.
24. R. takes Kt. (ch.) and wins.

[A] We have here a position almost identical with the leading one of the "Two Knights' Game."

[B] Transcriber's Note: This move is notated as the impossible 14. B. to K. B's 4th. (ch.) in the original text.



[137]

Game IV.—Between M. St. Amant and Mr. G. Walker

Go to PGN_47

 WHITE.  (Mr. W.)  BLACK.  (M. St. A.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to Q. B's 3d. 2. P. to Q's 4th.
 3. P. takes P. 3. Q. takes P.
 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 5. P. to Q. Kt's 3d. 5. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
 6. K. B. to K's 2d. 6. P. to K's 5th.
 7. Kt. to Q's 4th. 7. B. takes B.
 8. Kt. takes B. 8. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 9. Castles. 9. Q. Kt. to K's 4th.
10. Kt. to K. B's 4th.10. Q. to her 3d.
11. P. to Q's 4th.11. P. takes P. in passing.
12. K. R. to K's sq.12. Castles.
13. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.13. P. to K. B's 4th.
14. P. to Q. R's 4th.14. P. to Q. R's 4th.
15. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.15. P. takes P.
16. P. takes P.16. B. to Q's 5th.
17. Q. R. to Kt's sq.17. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
18. Kt. to Q. Kt's 3d.18. K. Kt. to Kt's 5th.
19. Kt. takes B.19. Q. takes Kt.
20. B. to K's 3d.20. Q. to her 3d.
21. B. to Q. B's 5th.21. Q. to K. R's 3d.
22. Kt. to K. R's 3d.22. K. R. to K's sq.
23. P. to Q. R's 5th.23. P. to Q's 7th.
24. R. to K. B's sq.24. Kt. to Q's 6th.
25. P. to Q. R's 6th.25. P. takes P.
26. Q. to K. B's 3d.26. K. R. to K's 5th.
27. Q. takes P. (ch.)27. Q. to K's 3d.
28. Q. takes Q. (ch.)28. R. takes Q.
29. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th.29. R. to K's 8th.
30. B. to K's 3d.30. Kt. takes B.
31. P. takes Kt.31. R. takes R. (ch.)
32. K. takes R.32. Kt. to Q. B's 8th.
And Black wins.

[TABLE OF CONTENTS]

[138]

CHAPTER IV.

THE KING'S GAMBIT.

This opening comprises every variety of the game in which the first player, after 1. P. to K's 4th has been played on both sides, commences the attack by moving 2. P. to K. B's 4th. Should the second player take this Pawn with his King's Pawn, he is said to accept the gambit.

This gambit has many modifications, the names appropriated to which will be found in their proper places in the following pages.

The King's Gambit Proper,
or King's Knight's Gambit.


GAME THE FIRST.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. P. to K. B's 4th.2. P. takes P.
3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.4. B. to K. Kt's 2d. (best)
5. P. to Q's 4th.5. P. to Q's 3d.
6. P. to Q. B's 3d.6. P. to K. Kt's 5th. (best)
7. Kt. to his sq.7. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
8. K. to B's sq.8. K. B. to K. R's 3d.
9. Q. to her Kt's 3d.9. Q. to K. R's 4th.

You can bring no Piece into action with advantage, while the field is all before him where to choose.

[139]

GAME THE SECOND.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. B. to K. Kt's 2d.
 5. P. to K. R's 4th. 5. P. to K. R's 3d. (best)
 6. P. to Q's 4th. 6. P. to Q's 3d.
 7. P. to Q. B's 3d. 7. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 8. Q. B. takes P. 8. P. takes Kt.
 9. Q. takes P. 9. Q. B. to K's 3d.
10. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.10. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
11. P. to K. R's 5th.11. B. takes B.
12. Kt. takes B.12. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.
13. Kt. to K's 3d.13. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.

You have no adequate compensation for the Piece you are minus.

Variation I.
Beginning at White's 7th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. B. to K. Kt's 2d.
 5. P. to K. R's 4th. 5. P. to K. R's 3d.
 6. P. to Q's 4th. 6. P. to Q's 3d.
 7. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 7. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 8. P. takes K. Kt. P. 8. P. takes P.
 9. R. takes R. 9. B. takes R.
10. K. Kt. to K's 5th.10. P. takes Kt.
11. Q. to K. R's 5th.11. Q. to K. B's 3d.
12. P. takes K. P.12. Q. to K. Kt's 2d.
13. P. to K's 6th.13. B. takes P. (best)
14. B. takes B.14. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
15. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.)15. K. to his 2d.
16. Q. to K. Kt's 6th.16. Q. takes B.
The advantage is all on Black's side.


[140]

GAME THE THIRD.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. B. to K. Kt's 2d.
 5. Castles. 5. P. to Q's 3d. (best)
 6. P. to Q's 4th. 6. P. to K. R's 3d.
 7. P. to Q. B's 3d. 7. Q. B. to K's 3d.
 8. B. takes B. 8. P. takes B.
 9. Q. to her Kt's 3d. 9. Q. to her B's sq.
10. P. to K. R's 4th.10. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
11. Kt. to K. R's 2d.11. P. to K. Kt's 6th.
He has a Pawn more and a strong position.


GAMES

ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE FOREGOING ANALYSES.

Game I.—Between V. H. der Laza and Dr. Bledow.

Go to PGN_48

 WHITE.  (V. H. d. L.)  BLACK.  (Dr. B.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. K. B. to Kt's 2d.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. Q. to K's 2d.[A]
 6. Castles. 6. P. to K. R's 3d.
 7. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 7. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 8. P. to K's 5th. 8. Q. to her Kt's 5th.
 9. Q. Kt. to K's 4th. 9. K. B. to his sq.
10. Q. to K's 2d.[B]10. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
11. Kt. to Q's 6th. (ch.)11. B. takes Kt.
12. P. takes B. (disc. ch.)12. K. to Q's sq.
13. Kt. to K's 5th.13. R. to R's 2d.
14. P. to Q. B's 3d.14. P. to K. B's 6th.
15. Q. to K's 4th.15. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
16. Q. takes R.16. Kt. takes Q.
And White gave checkmate in six moves.

[A] The proper move is 5. P. to Q's 3d.

[B] This little game is excellently played by White.



[141]

Game II.—Between V. H. der Laza and Mr. H. of Berlin.

Go to PGN_49

 WHITE.  (V. H. d. L.)  BLACK.  (Mr. H.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. B. to K. Kt's 2d.
 5. Castles. 5. P. to K. R's 3d.
 6. P. to Q's 4th. 6. P. to Q's 3d.
 7. P. to Q. B's 3d. 7. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 8. Q. to her Kt's 3d.[A] 8. Q. to K's 2d.
 9. P. to K. Kt's 3d. 9. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
10. Q. B. takes P.10. P. takes Kt.
11. R. takes P.11. Q. B. to K's 3d.
12. P. to Q's 5th.12. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
13. P. takes Q. B. P.13. B. takes R.
14. P. takes Kt. P.14. Q. takes K. P.
15. P. takes R. (becoming a Q.)15. Q. takes Q.
16. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.)16. K. to B's sq.
17. B. takes Kt.17. R. takes B.
18. B. takes Q. P. (ch.)18. K. to K's sq.
White mates in three moves.[B]

[A] Having now your Q. P. protected, and an opening for your Queen, you can advantageously advance the K. Kt's P., and sacrifice your Kt., as in the Muzio Gambit.

[B] A brilliant and amusing little skirmish.



Game III.—Between Mr. Popert and an eminent Polish player.

Go to PGN_50

 WHITE.  (Mr. Z.)  BLACK.  (Mr. P.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. B. to Q. Kt's 2d.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. P. to Q's 3d.
 6. Castles. 6. P. to K. R's 3d.
 7. P. to K. Kt's 3d. 7. P. to K's Kt's 5th.
 8. K. Kt. to R's 4th. 8. P. to K. B's 6th.
 9. Q. B. to K's 3d. 9. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
10. P. to Q. B's 3d.10. K. B. to B's 3d.
11. K. Kt. to K. B's 5th.11. Q. B. takes Kt.
12. P. takes B.12. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
13. Q. to her Kt's 3d.13. P. to Q's 4th.
14. K. B. to Q's 3d.14. Q. to her 2d.
15. Q. to her B's 2d.15. P. to K. R's 4th.
16. Kt. to Q's 2d.16. P. to K. R's 5th.
17. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.17. Castles on Q's side.
18. P. to Q. R's 4th.18. P. takes K. Kt. P.
19. Q. B. takes K. Kt's P.19. K. R. to his 4th.
20. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.20. K. Kt. takes K. B. P.
21. B. takes Kt.21. Q. takes B.
22. Q. to her Kt's 2d.22. B. to K. R's 5th.
23. B. takes B.23. R. takes B.
24. P. to Q. R's 5th.24. R. takes K. B. P.
25. K. takes R.
Black mates in three moves.


[142]

The Cunningham Gambit.

GAME THE FIRST.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. K. B. to K's 2d.
Black's 3d move commences the variation
known as the "Cunningham Gambit."
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. B. to R's 5th. (ch.)
 5. K. to B's sq. 5. K. B. to his 3d.
 6. P. to K's 5th. 6. B. to K's 2d.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. P. to Q's 4th.
 8. K. B. to K's 2d. 8. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 9. P. to K. R's 4th. 9. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
10. K. Kt to K. R's 2d.10. P. to K. R's 4th.
11. Q. B. takes P.11. K. B. takes K. R. P.
12. P. to K. Kt's 3d.12. B. to K. Kt's 4th.
13. Kt. takes K. Kt. P.
You must win.


GAME THE SECOND.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. B. to K's 2d.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. B. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
 5. P. to K. Kt's 3d. 5. P. takes P.
 6. Castles. 6. P. takes P. (ch.)
 7. K. to R's sq. 7. K. B. to his 3d.
 8. K. Kt. to K's 5th. 8. B. takes Kt. (best)
 9. Q. to K. R's 5th. 9. Q. to K's 2d. (best)
10. R. takes K. B. P.10. Q. to her B's 4th.
11. R. to K. B's 8th. (dble. ch.)11. K. to his 2d.
12. P. to Q's 4th.12. Q. takes P. (best)
13. Q. B. checks.13. K. to Q's 3d. (best)
14. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.14. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
15. Q. to K. B's 7th.15. Kt. takes K. P.
16. Q. B. to K's 3d.16. K. Kt. to his 6th. (ch.)
17. K. to Kt's 2d.17. Q. takes B.
18. Q. to her 5th. (ch.)18. K. to his 2d.
19. Q. to K. B's 7th. (ch.)19. K. to Q's 3d.
Drawn game.


[143]

Variation,
Beginning at Black's 7th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 7. P. to Q's 4th.
 8. B. takes P. 8. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 9. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.) 9. K. takes B.
10. Kt. takes K. B.10. K. R. to B's sq.
11. P. to Q's 4th.11. K. to Kt's sq.
12. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.12. K. Kt. takes K. P.
13. B. takes Q.13. R. takes R. (ch.)
14. Q. takes R.14. Kt. to his 6th. (ch.)
15. K. takes P.15. Kt. takes Q. (ch.)
He has the better game.


Another Variation.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 7. B. to K'S 2d.
 8. B. takes B. P. (ch.) 8. K. takes B.
 9. Kt. to K's 5th. (dble. ch.) 9. K. to his 3d. (best)
10. Q. to K. Kt's 4th. (ch.)10. K. takes Kt.
11. Q. to K. B's 5th. (ch.)11. K. to Q's 3d.
12. Q. to her 5th.
And wins.

[144]

GAME

ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE CUNNINGHAM GAMBIT.

Between two members of the Berlin Chess Club.

Go to PGN_51

 WHITE.  (V. H. d. L.)  BLACK.  (M. J.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. K. B. to K's 2d.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. B. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
 5. P. to K. Kt's 3d.[A] 5. P. takes P.
 6. Castles. 6. P. takes P. (ch.)
 7. K. to R's sq. 7. K. B. to B's 3d.
 8. Kt. to K's 5th. 8. B. takes Kt.
 9. Q. to K. R's 5th. 9. Q. to K's 2d.
10. R. takes K. B. P.10. Q. to her B's 4th.
11. R. to K. B's 8th. (dble ch.)11. K. to his 2d.
12. P. to Q's 4th.12. Q. takes P.[B]
13. B. to K. Kt's 5th. (ch.)13. K. Kt. to B's 3d.[C]
14. B. takes Kt. (ch.)14. P. takes B.
15. Q. to K. B's 7th. (ch.)15. K. to Q's 3d.
16. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.16. R. takes R.
17. Q. takes R. (ch.)17. K. to B's 3d.
18. Q. to her Kt's 4th.18. P. to Q's 4th.
19. B. to Kt's 5th. (ch.)19. K. to Kt's 3d.
20. Kt. mates.

[A] The correct reply is 5. K. to B's sq.

[B] The best move.

[C] K. to Q's 3d is the proper play.



The Salvio Gambit

GAME THE FIRST.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Kt. to K's 5th. 5. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
 6. K. to B's sq. 6. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
It is this move of Black that constitutes the Salvio defence.
 7. Q. to K's sq. (best) 7. Q. takes Q. (ch., best)
 8. K. takes Q. 8. Kt. takes K. P.
 9. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.) 9. K. to his 2d. (best).
10. B. to K. R's 5th.10. P. to K. Kt's 6th.
11. P. to K. R's 3d.11. P. to Q's 3d.
12. K. Kt. to Q's 3d.12. K. B. to R's 3d.
13. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.13. Kt. takes Kt.
14. Q. P. takes Kt.14. R. to K. B's sq.
15. R. to K. B's sq.15. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.
16. Kt. takes P.16. B. takes Kt.
17. B. takes B.17. K. R. to K. Kt's sq.
18. B. takes Q. P. (ch.)18. P. takes B.
19. R. takes B.19. K. R. to Kt's 2d.
You have a Pawn more and an advantage in position.


[145]

GAME THE SECOND.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Kt. to K's 5th. 5. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
 6. K. to B's sq. 6. K. Kt. to R's 3d.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. P. to K. B's 6th.
 8. P. takes P. 8. P. to Q's 3d.
 9. Kt. to Q's 3d. 9. K. Kt. P. takes P.
10. K. Kt. to K. B's 2d.10. Q. B. to K. R's 6th. (ch.)
11. Kt. takes B.11. Q. takes Kt. (ch.)
12. K. to B's 2d.12. Q. to Kt's 7th. (ch.)
13. K. to his 3d.13. Kt. to his 5th. (ch.)
14. K. to B's 4th.14. B. to R's 3d. (ch.)
And he mates you in two moves.


Variation,
Beginning from White's 8th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Kt. to K's 5th. 5. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
 6. K. to B's sq. 6. K. Kt. to R's 3d.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. P. to K. B's 6th.
 8. Q. B. to K. B's 4th. 8. P. takes P. (ch.)
 9. K. takes P. 9. P. to Q's 3d.
10. B. takes K. Kt.10. B. takes B.
11. Kt. to Q's 3d.11. Q. to R's 6th. (ch.)
12. K. to B's 2d.12. Q. to K's 6th. (ch.)
13. K. to B's sq.13. P. to Kt's 6th.
He has a fine attack


[146]

The Cochrane Gambit.

GAME THE FIRST.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Kt. to K's 5th. 5. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
 6. K. to B's sq. 6. P. to K. B's 6th.
In the previous Gambit you will remember Salvio advances this P.
one move later, that is, after his K. Kt. is moved to B's 3d,
or R's 3d sq.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. (best) 7. P. takes K. Kt. P. (ch., best.)
 8. K. takes P. 8. Q. to R's 6th. (ch.)
 9. K. to Kt's sq. 9. K. Kt. to R's 3d.
10. Q. to her 3d.10. Q. takes Q.
11. P. takes Q.11. P. to Q's 3d.
12. B. takes Kt.12. B. takes B.
13. Kt. takes K. B. P.13. B. to K's 6th. (ch.)
14. K. to Kt's 2d.14. R. to B's sq.
15. R. to B's sq.15. B. takes Q. P.
He ought to win.


[147]

GAME THE SECOND.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Kt. to K's 5th. 5. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
 6. K. to B's sq. 6. P. to K. B's 6th.
 7. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.) 7. K. to his 2d.
 8. P. takes P. 8. P. to Q's 3d.
 9. B. takes Kt. 9. P. takes Kt.
10. B. to Q. B's 4th.10. P. takes P.
11. Q. takes P.11. B. to K. R's 6th. (ch.)
12. K. to Kt's sq.12. Q. to K's 8th. (ch.)
13. B. to B's sq.13. R. checks.
And wins.


GAME THE THIRD.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Kt. to K's 5th. 5. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
 6. K. to B's sq. 6. P. to K. B's 6th.
 7. P. to K. Kt's 3d. 7. Q. to R's 6th. (ch.)
 8. K. to B's 2d. (best) 8. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 9. P. to Q's 3d. 9. P. to Q's 3d.
10. Kt. takes K. B. P.10. P. to Q's 4th.
11. Kt. takes R.11. Q. to Kt's 7th. (ch.)
12. K. to his 3d.12. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
13. Kt. to B's 7th.13. K. takes Kt.
14. B. takes Q. P. (ch.)14. Kt. takes B.
15. P. takes Kt.15. B. to K. R's 3d. (ch.)
And then P. to K. B's 7th, winning.


[148]

Variation I.
Beginning at White's 9th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 9. K. to his 3d. 9. B. to K. R's 3d. (ch.)
10. K. to Q's 3d.10. P. to Q's 3d.
11. Kt. takes K. B. P.11. P. to Q's 4th.
12. B. takes Q. P.12. Kt. takes B.
13. Kt. takes B.13. Kt. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.)
14. K. to B's 4th.14. Q. takes Kt.
15. K. takes Kt.15. Q. Kt. to R's 3d. (ch.)
16. K. to B's 3d.16. Q. to her B's 3d. (ch.)
17. K. to Q's 3d.17. Kt. to his 5th. (ch.)
18. K. to K's 3d.18. Kt. takes Q. B. P. (ch.)
Black must win.


Variation II.
Beginning at White's 9th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 9. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 9. Q. to Kt's 7th. (ch.)
10. K. to his 3d.10. B. to K. R's 3d. (ch.)
11. K. to Q's 3d.11. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
12. Kt. takes K. B. P.12. Q. Kt. to his 5th. (ch.)
13. K. to Q's 4th.13. Q. to B's 7th. (ch.)
14. K. to his 5th.14. P. to Q's 3d. (ch.)
15. K. takes Kt.15. Q. to her 5th. (ch.)
And Black wins.


GAME THE FOURTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Kt. to K's 5th. 5. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
 6. K. to B's sq. 6. P. to K. B's 6th.
 7. K. Kt. P. takes P. 7. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 8. P. to Q's 4th. 8. P. to Q's 3d.
 9. Kt. takes K. Kt. P. 9. Q to R's 6th. (ch.)
10. K. to his sq.10. Kt. takes Kt.
11. P. takes Kt.11. B. to K's 2d.
12. R. to B's sq.12. B. checks.
13. K. to Q's 2d.13. Q. B. takes P.
14. B. to K's 2d.14. K. B. to Kt's 4th. (ch.)
15. K. to his sq.15. Q. to R's 5th. (ch.)
16. R. to K. B's 2d.16. K. B. takes Q. B.
17. Q. takes B.17. Q. B. takes K. B.
18. K. takes B.18. Q. takes K. P. (ch.)
19. Q. to K's 3d.19. Q. takes Q. (ch.)
He has a Pawn more and no inferiority of position.


[149]

Variation I.
Beginning at White's 8th move.

 8. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.) 8. K. to his 2d.
 9. B. to Q. B's 4th. 9. P. to Q's 3d.
10. Kt. to Q's 3d.10. P. takes P.
11. Kt. to K. B's 2d.11. Q. B. to K. R's 6th. (ch.)
12. Kt. takes B.12. Q. takes Kt. (ch.)
13. K. to his sq.13. Kt. takes K. P.
His attack is irresistible.


Variation II.
Beginning at White's 8th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 8. Kt. takes K. Kt. P. 8. Kt. takes Kt.
 9. P. takes Kt. 9. Q. to R's 6th. (ch.)
10. K. to his sq.10. P. to Q's 4th.
11. B. to K's 2d.11. Q. to R's 5th. (ch.)
12. K. to B's sq.12. P. to K. R's 4th.
He has an excellent game.


Variation III.
Beginning at White's 8th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 8. Q. to K's 2d. 8. P. to Q's 3d.
 9. Kt. takes K. B. P. 9. P. takes P.
10. Q. to K. B's 2d.10. Q. B. to R's 6th. (ch.)
11. K. to his sq.11. Q. takes K. P. (ch.)
12. K. to Q's sq.12. Q. takes B.
He must win.


[150]

Variation IV.
Beginning at White's 8th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 8. P. to K. R's 3d. 8. P. takes K. R. P.
 9. Q. to K's sq. 9. Q. to K. Kt's 4th.
10. Kt. to his 4th.10. Kt. takes Kt.
11. P. takes Kt.11. Q. takes P.
12. Q. to K's 2d.12. P. to K. R's 4th.
13. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.13. R. to K. Kt's sq.
14. K. to his sq.14. B. to K's 2d.
15. Kt. to Q's 5th.15. Q. to R's 5th. (ch.)
16. K. to Q's sq.16. P. to Q. B's 3d.
17. Kt. to Q. B's 7th. (ch.)17. K. to Q's sq.
18. Kt. takes Q. R.18. P. to Q's 4th.
19. Q. to K's sq.19. P. takes B.
And wins.


An attentive consideration of the foregoing examples will lead you to the conclusion, I think, that the Salvio defence, or that of Cochrane, which varies from it in the transposition of Black's 6th and 7th moves, is a safe and trustworthy method of opposing the King's Gambit, and that the danger to be apprehended by the second player, in advancing his Pawn to K. Kt's 5th on the 4th move, is not that his opponent should play the Kt. to K's 5th, and admit of the Salvio or Cochrane defence, but that he should leave his Kt. to be taken, and adopt the powerful and almost irresistible attack of the Muzio Gambit.

[151]

GAMES

ILLUSTRATING THE SALVIO AND COCHRANE GAMBITS

Game I.—Between V. H. der Laza and H——d of Berlin.

Go to PGN_52

 WHITE.  (Mr. H.)  BLACK.  (V. H. d. L.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Kt. to K's 5th. 5. Q. to R's 5th. (ch.)
 6. K. to B's sq. 6. K. Kt. to R's 3d.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. P. to K. B's 6th.
 8. P. to K. Kt's 3d. 8. Q. to R's 6th. (ch.)
 9. K. to B's 2d. 9. Q. to K. Kt's 7th. (ch.)
10. K. to his 3d.10. P. to K. B's 3d.
11. Kt. to Q's 3d.11. K. Kt. to B's 2d.
12. Kt. to K. B's 4th.12. K. B. to K. R's 3d.
13. K. to Q's 3d.13. B. takes Kt.
14. Q. B. takes B.14. P. to Q. B's 3d.
15. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.15. Castles.
16. Q. B. to Q's 6th.16. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.
17. B. takes Kt. (ch.)17. R. takes B.
18. P. to K. R's 3d.18. P. to Q. Kt's 5th.
19. B. takes Q. Kt. P.19. Q. B. to R's 3d. (ch.)
20. K. to his 3d.20. Q. takes K. Kt. P.
21. Q. to K. Kt's sq.21. Q. to her B's 2d.
22. Q. takes P. (ch.)22. R. to K. Kt's 2d.
23. Q. takes doubled P., and wins.


Game II.—From Mr. Cochrane's Treatise.

Go to PGN_53

 WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to Kt's 5th.
 5. Kt. to K's 5th. 5. Q. checks.
 6. K. to B's sq. 6. P. to K. B's 6th.
 7. Q. to K's sq. 7. P. takes P. (ch.)
 8. K. takes P. 8. Q. to K. R's 6th. (ch.)
 9. K. to his B's 2d. 9. K. B. to Kt's 2d.
10. P. to Q's 4th.10. P. to Q's 3d.
11. B. takes B. P. (ch.)11. K. to his 2d.
12. B. takes K. Kt.12. R. takes B.
13. K. Kt. to Q. B's 4th.13. Q. to K. B's 6th. (ch.)
14. K. to Kt's sq.14. B. takes Q. P. (ch.)
15. B. to K's 3d.15. P. to K. Kt's 6th.
16. P. to K. R's 3d.16. P. to Kt's 7th.
17. K. R. to his 2d.17. Q. B. takes K. R. P.
18. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.18. Q. to K. B's 8th. (ch.)
19. Kt. takes Q.19. P. takes Kt.
Becoming a Q., giving check, double check, and mate.


[152]

The Muzio Gambit.

In the two defences to the King's Gambit by Salvio and Cochrane just examined, when the second player for his fourth move advances his P. to K. Kt's 5th, attacking the Knight, White replies by moving his Knight to King's 5th, subjecting himself, as was shown, to a counter-attack, from which escape without loss is difficult if not impracticable. From this circumstance, apparently, originated the conception of the "Muzio Gambit," wherein the first player instead of removing the attacked Knight boldly abandons him, and by castling is enabled to bring an almost overwhelming array of forces to the immediate assault of the adverse King.

GAME THE FIRST.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Castles. 5. P. takes Kt.
 6. Q. takes P. (best) 6. Q. to K. B's 3d. (best)
 7. P. to K's 5th. 7. Q. takes K. P.
 8. P. to Q's 3d. 8. K. B. to K. R's 3d.
 9. Q. B. to Q's 2d. 9. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
10. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.10. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
11. Q. R. to K's sq.11. Q. to B's 4th. (ch.)
12. K. to R's sq.12. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th.
13. R. takes Kt. (ch.)13. K. takes R.
14. Kt. to Q's 5th. (ch.)14. K. to Q's sq.
15. Q. to K. R's 5th.15. Q. to K. B's sq.
16. Q. to K. R's 4th. (ch.)16. P. to B's 3d.
17. Q. B. takes P.17. B. takes B.
18. R. takes B.18. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
19. R. takes K. B. P.19. Q. to K's sq.
20. R. to B's 8th. (dis. ch.)20. Kt. to K's 2d.
21. Q. takes Kt.
Mate.


[153]

GAME THE SECOND.
Varying from the preceding at Black's 10th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Castles. 5. P. takes Kt.
 6. Q. takes P. (best) 6. Q. to K. B's 3d. (best)
 7. P. to K's 5th. 7. Q. takes K. P.
 8. P. to Q's 3d. 8. K. B. to K. R's 3d.
 9. Q. B. to Q's 2d, 9. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
10. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.10. P. to Q. B's 3d.
11. Q. K. to K's sq.11. Q. to her B's 4th. (ch.)
12. K. to R's sq.12. P. to Q's 4th.
13. Q. to K. R's 5th.13. Q. to her 3d.
14. B. takes Q. P.14. P. takes B.
15. Kt. takes Q. P.15. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
16. Q. B. to his 3d.16. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.
17. R. takes Kt. (ch.)17. K. to B's sq.
18. R. to K's 8th. (ch.)18. K. takes R.
19. Kt. to K. B's 6th. (ch.)19. K. to B's sq.
20. Q. to her B's 5th. (ch.)20. Kt. to K's 2d. (best)
21. R. to K's sq.21. Q. B. to K's 3d.
22. Kt. to Q's 7th. (ch.)22. Q. B. takes Kt.
23. Q. takes Kt. (ch.)23. K. to Kt's sq.
24. Q. takes B.24. Q. R. to K. B's sq.
25. Q. takes Q. Kt. P.
And the game is about even.

I think the attack, in a majority of the variations which arise in this game, may be strengthened by your interposing the K. R. at move 12, instead of retreating the K.

Variation.
Beginning at Black's 19th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
19. K. to Q's sq.
20. Q. to her 5th. (ch.)20. K. to Q. B's 2d.
21. B. to K's 5th. (ch.)21. Kt. takes B.
22. Q. takes Kt. (ch.)22. K. to B's 3d. (best)
23. Q. to her 5th. (ch.)23. K. to Kt's 3d.
24. Q. to her 6th. (ch.)24. K. to R's 4th.
25. Q. to her B's 5th. (ch.)25. K. to R's 3d.
26. Q. to B's 4th. (ch.)26. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.
27. Q. to B's 6th. (ch.)27. K. to K's 4th.
28. P. to Q. R's 4th.
And he cannot possibly save the game.


[154]

GAME THE THIRD.
Varying from the former at White's 8th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Castles. 5. P. takes Kt.
 6. Q. takes P. (best) 6. Q. to K. B's 3d. (best)
 7. P. to K's 5th. 7. Q. takes K. P.
 8. P. to Q. Kt's 3d. 8. Q. takes R. (best)
 9. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 9. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. (ch.)
10. K. to R's sq.10. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
11. P. to Q's 4th.11. B. takes Q. P.
12. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.)12. K. to Q's sq.
13. B. to Q's 2d.13. Q. takes R. (ch.)
14. Q. takes Q.14. R. to K. B's sq.
15. Q. takes P.15. B. takes Kt.
16. B. takes B.16. P. to Q's 3d.
Black has the advantage.


GAME THE FOURTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th,
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th
 4. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Castles. 5. P. takes Kt.
 6. Q. takes P. 6. K. B. to K. R's 3d.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 8. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 8. Kt. takes Q. P.
 9. Q. to K. R's 5th. 9. Q. Kt. to K's 3d.
10. Q. B. takes P.10. B. takes B.
11. R. takes B.11. Q. to K's 2d.
12. B. takes Kt.12. Q. P. takes B.
13. Q. R. to K. B's sq.
You must win.


[155]

Variation I.
Beginning at Black's 6th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Castles. 5. P. takes Kt.
 6. Q. takes P. 6. P. to Q's 3d.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. B. to K. R's 3d.
 8. Q. B. takes P. 8. B. takes B.
 9. Q. takes B. 9. Q. to K's 2d.
10. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.)10. K. to Q's sq.
11. P. to K's 5th.
With a capital opening.


Variation II.
Beginning at Black's 6th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Castles. 5. P. takes Kt.
 6. Q. takes P. 6. Q. to K's 2d.
 7. P to Q's 4th. 7. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 8. Q. takes P. 8. Kt. takes Q. P.
 9. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.) 9. K. to Q's sq.
10. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.10. K. Kt. to R's 3d.
11. Q. B. to K's 3d.11. Q. Kt. to K's 3d.
12. K. B. takes Kt.12. Q. takes B.
13. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th.13. P. to Q's 3d.
14. Q. to K. R's 4th. (ch.)
You ought to win.


[156]

GAME THE FIFTH.

Koch and Ghulam Kassim's Attack.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. P. takes Kt.
White's 5th move characterizes the game known as
"Koch and Ghulam Kassim's Attack."
 6. Q. takes P. 6. P. to Q's 4th.
 7. K. B. takes Q. P. 7. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 8. B. to Q. Kt's 3d. 8. Q. takes Q. P.
 9. Q. B. takes P. 9. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
10. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.10. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
11. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.11. K. Kt. takes P.
12. Q. Kt. takes Kt.12. Q. takes Kt. (ch.)
13. K. to Q's 2d.
You have the better game.


Variation I.
Beginning at White's 8th move.

 8. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.) 8. K. takes B.
 9. Q. B. takes P. 9. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
10. P. to Q. B's 3d.10. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
I prefer Black's game.


[157]

Variation II.
Beginning at Black's 6th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. P. takes Kt.
 6. Q. takes P. 6. P. to Q's 3d.
 7. Castles. 7. Q. to K. B's 3d.
 8. Q. Kt. to R's 3d. 8. Q. takes Q. P. (ch.)
 9. K. to R's sq. 9. K. B. to R's 3d.
10. Q. B. takes P.10. Q. to K. B's 3d.
11. Q. to K's 3d.11. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.
12. P. to K's 5th.12. B. takes B.
13. R. takes B.13. B. to K's 3d.
14. P. takes Q. P.
You have a capital attack.


GAME THE SIXTH.

McDonnell's Attack.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. P. takes Kt.
 6. Q. takes P. 6. P. to Q's 4th.
 7. B. takes Q. P. 7. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 8. B. to Q. Kt's 3d. 8. Q. B. to K's 3d.
 9. B. takes B. 9. P. takes B.
10. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)10. K. to Q's 2d.
11. P. to Q's 4th.11. Q. to K. B's 3d.
12. P. to K's 5th.12. Q. to K. B's 4th.
13. Q. to K. B's 3d.13. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th.
14. Q. B. takes P.14. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
15. Castles on K's side.15. B. takes Kt.
16. P. takes B.16. Q. Kt. to R's 3d.
The game is in his favor.


[158]

Our examination of this Gambit would be imperfect without some notice of a variation in the opening, where the first player, instead of abandoning the Knight at his 5th move, sacrifices his Bishop by taking the K. B. Pawn, checking. This attack is not, strictly speaking, a part of the Muzio Gambit, but it is so intimately associated with it that I think it better to consider them both under the same head.

GAME THE SEVENTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.) 5. K. takes B.
 6. Kt. to K's 5th. (ch.) 6. K. to his sq.
 7. Q. takes P. 7. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 8. Q. takes K. B. P. 8. P. to Q's 3d.
 9. Kt. to Q. B's 4th. 9. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
10. Castles.10. B. to K. Kt's 2d.
11. P. to Q's 3d.11. Q. B. to K's 3d.
12. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.12. Q. to K's 2d.
Your attack is exhausted.


GAMES

ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE MUZIO GAMBIT.

Game I.—Between Mr. Lewis and an Amateur of great skill.

Go to PGN_54

 WHITE.  (Mr. L.)  BLACK.  (Mr. ——)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Castles. 5. P. takes Kt.
 6. Q. takes P. 6. K. B. to R's 3d.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. Q. to K's 2d.
 8. Q. B. takes P. 8. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 9. Q. B. takes K. B. 9. Kt. takes B.
10. Q. to K. R's 5th.10. Q. to K. B's sq.
11. K. R. to B's 6th.11. Q. to K. Kt's 2d.
12. Q. takes Kt.12. Q. takes Q.
13. K. R. takes Q.13. Q. Kt. takes Q. P.
14. Q. Kt. to Q. R's 3d.14. P. to Q. B's 3d.
15. K. R. to Q's 6th.15. Kt. to K's 3d.
16. Q. R. to Q's sq.16. K. R. to K. Kt's sq.
17. K. B. takes Kt.17. K. B. P. takes B.
18. Kt. to Q. B's 4th.18. K. R. to K. Kt's 4th.
19. K. to B's 2d.19. K. to his 2d.
20. Kt. to K's 3d.20. P. to Q. R's 4th.
21. K. to his B's 3d.21. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.
22. Kt. to K. Kt's 4th.22. Q. R. to his 2d.
23. K. to B's 4th.23. K. R. to Q. B's 4th,
24. P. to Q. B's 3d.24. P. to Q. Kt's 5th.
25. P. takes P.25. P. takes P.
26. Kt. to K's 5th.26. K. R. to Q. B's 7th.
27. P. to Q. R's 4th.27. R. takes Q. Kt. P.
28. K. R. takes Q. B. P.28. R. to K. B's 7th. (ch.)
29. K. to his 3d.29. R. to K. B's sq.
30. Q. R. to Q. B's sq.30. B. to Q. R's 3d.
31. K. R. to Q. B's 7th.31. R. takes R.
32. R. takes R.32. K. to Q's 3d.
33. R. to Q. R's 7th.33. K. takes Kt.
34. R. takes B.34. R. to Q. Kt's sq.
35. R. to Q. R's 5th. (ch.)35. P. to Q's 4th.
36. P. takes P.36. P. takes P.
37. K. to Q's 3d.37. R. to Q. B's sq.
38. R. to Q. Kt's 5th.38. R. to Q. B's 6th. (ch.)
39. K. to Q's 2d.39. R. to Q. B's 5th.
40. P. to Q. R's 5th.40. R. to K. B's 5th.
41. P. to Q. R's 6th.41. R. to K. B's 7th. (ch.)
42. K. to Q's 3d.42. R. to Q. R's 7th.
43. R. takes Q. Kt. P.43. R. takes Q. R. P.
Drawn game.


[159]

Game II.—Between Mr. Szen, of Hungary, and V. H. der Laza, of the Berlin Chess Club.

Go to PGN_55

 WHITE.  (V. H. d. L.)  BLACK.  (Mr. S.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to Kt's 4th.
 4. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Castles. 5. P. takes Kt.
 6. Q. takes P. 6. Q. to K. B's 3d.
 7. P. to K's 5th. 7. Q. takes K. P.
 8. P. to Q's 3d. 8. K. B. to K. R's 3d.
 9. Kt. to Q. B's 3d. 9. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
10. Q. B. to Q's 2d.10. Castles.[A]
11. Q. R. to K's sq.11. Q. to Q. B's 4th. (ch.)
12. K. to R's sq.12. P. to Q. B's 3d.
13. Kt. to K's 4th.13. Q. to K. B's 4th.
14. Q. B. to his 3d.14. B. to K. Kt's 2d.
15. Kt. to Q's 6th.15. Q. to K. Kt's 4th.
16. R. takes Kt.[B]16. B. takes Q. B.[C]
17. R. takes K. B. P.17. R. takes R.
18. B. takes R. (ch.)18. K. to Kt's 2d.
19. P. takes B.19. Kt. to Q. R's 3d.
20. Q. takes K. B. P.20. Q. takes Q.
21. R. takes Q.21. Kt. to Q. B's 2d.
22. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.22. Kt. to Q's 4th.
23. B. takes Kt.23. P. takes B.
24. R. to B's 7th. (ch.)24. K. to Kt's sq.
25. R. to K's 7th.25. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.
26. R. to K's 8th. (ch.)26. K. to Kt's 2d.
27. R. takes B.
And wins.

[A] Not considered so strong a move as 10 P. to Q. B's 3d.

[B] Well played.

[C] Had he taken R. with Q., White would have won a Piece by at once playing Kt. to K. B's 5th.



[160]

Game III.—Between two Berlin players.

Go to PGN_56

 WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Castles. 5. P. takes Kt.
 6. Q. takes P. 6. Q. to K. B's 3d.
 7. P. to K's 5th. 7. Q. takes P.
 8. P. to Q's 3d. 8. K. B. to R's 3d.
 9. Q. B. to Q's 2d. 9. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
10. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.10. P. to Q. B's 3d.
11. Q. R. to K's sq.11. Q. to B's 4th. (ch.)
12. K. to R's sq.12. P. to Q's 4th.
13. Q. to K. R's 5th.13. Q. to her 3d.
14. K. B. takes Q. P.14. Castles.
15. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.15. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.
16. Q. to Q. B's 5th.16. K. Kt. to K. B's 4th.
17. Q. B. takes P.17. K. B. takes B.
18. K. R. takes B.18. K. Kt. to his 2d.
19. Kt. to K's 4th.19. K. Kt. to K's 3d.
20. B. takes Kt.20. Q. B. takes B.
21. Kt. to B's 6th. (ch.)21. K. to Kt's 2d.
22. R. takes B.22. P. takes R.
23. Kt. to R's 5th. (ch.)23. K. to R's 3d.
24. R. takes R.24. Q. takes Kt.
25. R. to B's 6th. (ch.)25. K. to Kt's 2d.
26. Q. mates.


[161]

Game IV.—Between La Bourdonnais and McDonnell.

Go to PGN_57

 WHITE.  (Mr. McD.)  BLACK.  (M. La B.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. P. takes Kt.
 6. Q. takes P. 6. K. B. to K. R's 3d.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 8. Castles. 8. Q. Kt. takes Q. P.
 9. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.) 9. K. takes B.
10. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)10. K. to his Kt's 2d.
11. Q. B. takes P.11. B. takes B.
12. K. R. takes B.12. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
13. Q. to K. Kt's 5th. (ch.)13. K. to B's 2d.
14. Q. R. to K. B's sq.14. K. to his sq.
15. K. R. takes Kt.15. Q. to K's 2d.
16. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th.16. Q. to her B's 4th.
17. K. to R's sq.17. Kt. to K's 3d.
18. K. R. takes Kt.18. P. takes R.
19. Kt. to B's 6th. (ch.)
And wins the Queen.


Game V.—From Ghulam Kassim.

Go to PGN_58

 WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. P. takes Kt.
 6. Q. takes P. 6. P. to Q's 4th.
 7. B. takes P. 7. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 8. Castles. 8. Kt. takes B.
 9. P. takes Kt. 9. Q. to B's 3d.
10. Q. to K's 4th. (ch.)10. K. to Q's sq.
11. B. takes P.11. Q. to K's 2d.
12. Q. to B's 3d.12. R. to Kt's sq.
13. Kt. to Q's 2d.13. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
14. Q. to B's 2d.14. Kt. to Q's 2d.
15. Q. R. to K's sq.15. Q. to B's 3d.
16. Kt. to K's 4th.16. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.
17. P. to Q. B's 4th.17. K. B. to Q's 3d.
18. B. takes B.18. P. takes B.
19. P. to Q. B's 5th.19. P. takes P.
20. P. takes P.20. K. R. to K's sq.
21. Kt. to Q's 6th.21. R. takes R.
22. Q. takes R.22. K. to Q. B's 2d.
23. Q. to her Kt's 4th.23. K. to Q's sq.
White must win.


[162]

Game VI.—Mr. Staunton gives his Queen's Rook.

(Remove White's Q. R. from the Board.)

Go to PGN_59

 WHITE.  (Mr. S.)  BLACK.  (Mr. ——.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.) 5. K. takes B.
 6. Kt. to K's 5th. (ch.) 6. K. to his sq.
 7. Q. takes P. 7. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 8. Q. takes P. 8. P. to Q's 3d.
 9. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 9. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
10. P. to Q's 4th.10. Q. to K's 2d.
11. Castles.11. Q. B. to Q's 2d.
12. P. to K's 5th.12. P. takes P.
13. P. takes P.13. K. Kt. to Q's 4th.
14. Q. to K's 4th.14. Q. B. to K's 3d.
15. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.15. Q. to her B's 4th. (ch.)
16. K. to R's sq.16. Q. Kt. to his 5th.
17. P. to Q. B's 4th.17. K. Kt. to Q. Kt's 3d.
18. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.18. K. B. to K's 2d.
19. K. Kt. to Q's 4th.19. Q. B. to K. Kt's sq.
20. B. takes K. B.20. Q. takes B.
21. K. Kt. to K. B's 5th.21. Q. to her 2d.
22. Q. to K. R's 4th.22. Q. R. to Q's sq.
23. Q. to K. B's 6th.
And wins.


The Allgaier Gambit.

GAME THE FIRST.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. P. to K. R's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th. (best)
White's 4th move constitutes the Allgaier Gambit.
 5. Kt. to Kt's 5th. 5. P. to K. R's 3d.
 6. Kt. takes K. B. P 6. K. takes Kt.
 7. Q. takes P. 7. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 8. Q. takes K. B. P. 8. K. B. to Q's 3d. (best)
 9. B. to Q. B's 4th. (ch.) 9. K. to Kt's 2d. (best)
10. Q. to K. B's 5th.10. B. to Kt's 6th. (ch.)
11. K. to B's sq.11. K. R. to B's sq.
Black has a winning position.


[163]

Variation,
Beginning at Black's 5th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. P. to K. R's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Kt. to Kt's 5th. 5. P. to K. R's 4th.
 6. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 6. K. Kt. to R's 3d.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. P. to K. B's 3d.
 8. Q. B. takes P. 8. P. takes Kt.
 9. P. takes P. 9. Kt. to B's 2d.
10. P. to K. Kt's 6th.10. Kt. to Q's 3d.
11. Q. B. takes Kt.11. P. takes B.
12. B. to B's 7th. (ch.)12. K. to his 2d.
13. Castles.13. Q. to her R's 4th.
14. B. to Q's 5th.14. K. to his sq.
15. Q. to her B's sq.15. K. to Q's sq.
16. Q. to K. Kt's 5th. (ch.)16. B. to K's 2d.
17. P. to K. Kt's 7th.
And you win with ease.


GAME THE SECOND.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. P. to K. R's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Kt. to K's 5th. 5. P. to K. R's 4th. (best)
 6. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 6. K. Kt. to R's 3d
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. P. to Q's 3d.
 8. Kt. to Q's 3d. 8. P. to K. B's 6th.
 9. P. to K. Kt's 3d. 9. P. to Q's 4th.
10. B. takes Q. P.10. P. to Q. B's 3d.
11. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.11. Q. takes Q. P.
He has decidedly the better game.


[164]

GAME THE THIRD.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. P. to K. R's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Kt. to K's 5th. 5. P. to K. R's 4th.
 6. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 6. R. to K. R's 2d.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. P. to K. B's 6th. (best)
 8. P. to K. Kt's 3d. 8. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 9. Kt. takes Kt. 9. Q. P. takes Kt.
10. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.10. Q. to K's 2d.
11. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.11. Q. B. to K's 3d.
12. P. to Q's 5th.12. Castles on Q's side.

He has a little better game, but the advantage is not nearly so decisive as in the second game.

The King's Rook's Pawn Gambit.

GAME THE FIRST.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. P. to K. R's 4th. 3. K. B. to K's 2d. (best)
White's 3d move gives the title to this Gambit.
 4. Q. to K. Kt's 4th. 4. P. to Q's 4th. (best)
 5. Q. takes doubled P. 5. P. takes P.
 6. Q. takes K. P. 6. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 7. Q. to K. B's 3d. 7. Castles.
 8. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 8. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
 9. Q. takes Q. Kt. P. 9. Q. to her 3d.
10. Q. to her Kt's 3d.10. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
11. Q. to her 3d.11. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th.
12. P. to Q. B's 3d.12. Q. to K's 4th. (ch.)
13. K. to B's sq.13. Q. Kt. to K. B's 4th.
Black has a winning game.


[165]

Variation,
Beginning at Black's 3d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. P. to K. R's 4th. 3. P. to Q's 4th.
 4. P. takes P. 4. Q. takes P.
 5. Q. to K's 2d. (ch.) 5. Q. B. to K's 3d.
 6. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 6. Q. to her 2d.
 7. P. to Q's 3d. 7. K. B. to Q's 3d.
 8. K. Kt. to R's 3d. 8. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 9. Q. Kt. to his 5th. 9. Castles on Q's side.
10. Kt. takes B. (ch.)10. P. takes Kt.
11. Kt. takes P.11. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
12. Q. to her 2d.12. R. to K's sq. (ch.)
And he has the better game.


GAMES

ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE ALLGAIER GAMBIT.

Game I.—Between Messrs. Anderssen and Kipping,
at the Manchester Chess Meeting, in 1857.

Go to PGN_60

 WHITE.  (Mr. A.)  BLACK.  (Mr. K.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. Kt. to K. B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. P. to K. R's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Kt. to K's 5th. 5. P. to K. R's 4th.
 6. B. to Q. B's 4th. 6. R. to K. R's 2d.
 7. B. takes P. (ch.) 7. R. takes B.
 8. Kt. takes R. 8. K. takes Kt.
 9. P. to Q's 4th. 9. P. to Q's 3d.
10. B. takes P.10. K. B. to K's 2d.
11. Castles.11. K. to Kt's 2d.
12. P. to K. Kt's 3d.12. Q. B. to K's 3d.
13. Q. to Q's 3d.13. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.
14. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.14. P. to Q. B's 4th.
15. Kt. to K's 2d.15. Q. B. to K. B's 2d.
16. K. R. to K. B's 2d.16. Q. B. to K. Kt's 3d.
17. Q. R. to K. B's sq.17. Q. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
18. P. takes Q. B. P.18. B. takes K. P.
19. Q. to K's 3d.19. P. takes Q. B. P.
20. B. to K's 5th.20. Q. to Q's 4th.
21. Q. to K. Kt's 5th. (ch.)21. K. to K. R's 2d.
22. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.22. Q. to Q. B's 3d.
23. B. takes Kt.23. B. takes B.
24. K. takes B.
And Black resigns.


[166]

Game II.—Between Mr. Cochrane and Capt. Evans.

Go to PGN_61

 WHITE.  (Mr. C.)  BLACK.  (Capt. E.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. P. to K. R's 4th. 4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. Kt. to K's 5th. 5. P. to K. R's 4th.
 6. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 6. K. R. to his 2d.
 7. Kt. takes K. B. P. 7. R. takes Kt.
 8. B. takes R. (ch.) 8. K. takes B.
 9. P. to Q's 4th. 9. B. to K. R's 3d.[A]
10. B. takes P.10. B. takes B.
11. Castles.11. Q. takes K. R. P.
12. R. takes B. (ch.)12. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
13. P. to K's 5th.13. P. to Q's 4th.
14. R. takes Kt. (ch.)14. K. to Kt's 2d.
15. Q. to her 2d.15. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.
16. Q. to K. R's 6th. (ch.)
And Black resigns.

[A] This is the error which loses Black's game. The correct move is 9. P. to K. B's 6th.



[167]

The King's Bishop's Gambit.

GAME THE FIRST.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
White's 3d move gives the name to this Gambit.
 4. K. to B's sq. 4. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 5. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. K. B. to K. Kt's 2d.
 6. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 6. Q. to K. R's 4th.
 7. P. to K. R's 4th. 7. P. to K. R's 3d.
 8. P. to Q's 4th. 8. P. to Q's 3d.
 9. P. to K's 5th. 9. P. takes P.
10. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th.10. K. to Q's sq.
11. P. takes P.11. B. to Q's 2d.
12. K. to his Kt's sq.12. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.
13. P. takes P.13. P. takes P.
14. R. takes R.14. B. takes R.
15. K. Kt. takes P.15. Q. takes K. Kt.
16. Q. B. takes P.16. Q. to K. Kt's 3d. (best)
17. P. to K's 6th.17. P. takes P.
18. Kt. takes Q. B. P.18. P. to K's 4th.
19. Kt. takes Q. R.19. P. takes B.
20. B. takes K. Kt.20. Q. takes B.
21. Q. to her 6th.21. Q. Kt. to R's 3d.
22. R. to Q's sq.22. Q. to K. B's 2d.
23. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.23. Q. to K's 2d.
24. Q. takes K. B. P.24. Q. takes Q. Kt. P.
25. Q. to K. B's 7th.25. Q. to K's 2d.
26. Q. to K. Kt's 8th. (ch.)26. Q. to K's sq.
27. Q. to K. Kt's 5th. (ch.)27. K. to Q. B's sq.
And Black is getting into safe quarters.


Variation I.
Beginning at White's 6th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 6. P. to Q's 4th. 6. P. to Q's 3d.
 7. P. to K's 5th. 7. P. takes P.
 8. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th. 8. K. to Q's sq.
 9. P. takes P. 9. B. to Q's 2d.
10. K. Kt. to B's 3d.10. Q. to K. R's 4th.
11. Q. B. to Q's 2d.11. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
12. Q. B. to his 3d.12. K. R. to K's sq.
13. Kt. takes Kt.13. R. takes Kt.
14. Q. to her 5th.
The game is about equal.


[168]

Variation II.
Beginning at White's 6th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 6. P. to K. Kt's 3d. 6. P. takes P.
 7. K. to Kt's 2d. 7. Q. to K. R's 3d.
 8. P. takes P. 8. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.
He has the advantage.


GAME THE SECOND.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. Q. checks.
 4. K. to B's sq. 4. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 5. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. Q. to K. R's 4th.
 6. P. to K. R's 4th. 6. K. B. to K. Kt's 2d.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. P. to K. R's 3d.
 8. P. to K's 5th. 8. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
 9. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 9. K. Kt. to B's 4th.
10. Q. Kt. to K's 4th.10. P. to Q's 3d.
11. K. P. takes P.11. Q. B. P. takes P.
12. Q. to K's 2d.12. K. to Q's sq.
13. P. to Q. B's 3d.13. K. R. to K's sq.
14. K. to Kt's sq.14. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
15. K. Kt. to Q's 2d.15. P. to K. B's 6th.
16. Q. to her 3d.16. P. takes K. Kt. P.
17. K. takes P.17. P. to Q's 4th.
18. K. B. takes P.18. Kt. takes K. R. P. (ch.)
And he has the better game.


Variation I.
Beginning at White's 7th move.

 7. K. to Kt's sq. 7. B. to Q's 5th. (ch.)
 8. K. to R's 2d. 8. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 9. Kt. takes B. 9. P. to Kt's 6th. (ch.)
10. K. to R's 3d.10. P. to Q's 4th. (dis. ch.)
11. Kt. to K. B's 5th.11. Q. takes Q.
12. R. takes Q.12. Kt. to K. R's 3d.
13. P. to K. R's 5th.13. P. takes K. P.
14. K. to R's 4th.14. Kt. takes Kt. (ch.)
15. K. to Kt's 5th.15. P. to K. B's 6th.
16. K. to B's 4th.16. P. to K. B's 7th.
Black wins.


[169]

Variation II.
Beginning at White's 7th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 7. K. R. to his 2d. 7. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 8. K. Kt. to Kt's 5th. 8. K. Kt. to R's 3d.
 9. P. to Q's 4th. 9. P. to Q's 4th.
10. K. B. takes Q. P. (best)10. P. to K. Kt's 6th.
11. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.)11. Q. takes B.
12. Kt. takes Q.12. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
13. Q. to K's sq.13. P. takes R.
14. K. to B's 2d.14. K. B. takes Q. P. (ch.)
And Black wins.


Variation III.
Beginning also at White's 7th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 7. B. to K's 2d. 7. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 8. Kt. to K's sq. 8. K. Kt to B's 3d.
 9. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 9. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.
10. P. to Q's 3d.10. Kt. to K. R's 4th.
11. Kt. to Q's 5th.11. Kt. to Kt's 6th. (ch.)
12. K. to Kt's sq.12. K. B. checks.
13. K. to R's 2d.13. Kt. takes B.
He ought to win.


[170]

GAME THE THIRD.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
 4. K. to B's sq. 4. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 5. Q. to K. B's 3d. 5. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 6. P. to K. Kt's 3d. 6. Q. to K. R's 3d.
 7. P. takes P. 7. P. takes P.
 8. P. to Q's 3d. 8. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th.
 9. Q. to K. B's 2d. 9. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
10. Q. B. takes P.10. Q. Kt. takes Q. B. P.
11. B. takes Q.11. B. takes Q.
12. Q. B. to K. Kt's 7th.12. K. B. to Q's 5th.
Black maintains his Pawn


Variation,
Beginning at Black's 5th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. Q. checks.
 4. K. to B's sq. 4. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 5. Q. to K. B's 3d. 5. P. to Q's 3d.
 6. P. to K. Kt's 3d. 6. Q. to K. Kt's 5th.
 7. P. to Q's 4th. 7. Q. takes Q.
 8. Kt. takes Q. 8. K. B. to K. R's 3d.
 9. P. takes P. 9. P. takes P.
10. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.10. Q. B. checks.
11. K. to B's 2d.11. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
12. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.12. K. Kt. to his 3d.
13. K. Kt. to K's sq.

Followed by 14. K. Kt. to Q's 3d, winning the P., with a good situation.


In the previous games we have followed out, at some length, the most prominent variations which occur when [171]both the attack and defence in this opening are conducted upon the principles recommended by the best authorities, and the result would seem to prove that against every system of attack in the King's Bishop's Gambit at present known, the defence, though difficult and complex in the extreme, is satisfactory.

It yet remains for us to consider what are the probable deviations from the several standard methods of defence, and in what manner these should be turned to advantage by the opening player.

GAME THE FIRST.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 4. P. to K. R's 4th. 4. B. to K. Kt's 2d.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. P. to K. R's 3d.
 6. P. takes P. 6. P. takes P.
 7. R. takes R. 7. B. takes R.
 8. Q. to K. R's 5th. 8. Q. to K. B's 3d.
 9. P. to K's 5th. 9. Q. to K. Kt's 2d.
10. K. Kt. to K. R's 3d.
You have the better game.


GAME THE SECOND.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. P. to K. B's 4th.2. P. takes P
3. B. to Q. B's 4th.3. P. to K. B's 4th.
4. Q. to K's 2d.4. Q. checks.
5. K. to Q's sq. (best)5. P. takes K. P.
6. Q. takes P. (ch.)6. B. to K's 2d.
7. P. to Q's 4th.7. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
8. Q. takes K. B. P.8. Q. takes Q.
Even game.


[172]

Variation,
Beginning at White's 4th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 4. Q Kt. to B's 3d. 4. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
 5. K. to B's sq. 5. K. Kt. to B's 3d, or (A.)
 6. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 6. Q. to K. R's 4th.
 7. P. to K's 5th. 7. K. Kt. to K's 5th.
 8. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th. 8. K. Kt. to his 6th. (ch.)
 9. K. to K. Kt's sq. 9. K. Kt. takes R.
10. Kt. takes Q. B. P. (ch.)10. K. to Q's sq.
11. Q. Kt. takes Q. R.11. K. Kt. to his 6th.
12. P. takes K. Kt.12. P. takes P.
13. P. to Q's 4th.13. K. B. to K's 2d.
14. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.14. Q. to K. Kt's 5th.
15. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th.15. Q. takes Q. B.
16. Kt. to K. B's 7th. (ch.)16. K. to his sq.
17. Q. to her 3d.17. K. B. to Q's sq.
18. K. Kt. to Q's 6th. (ch.)18. K. to B's sq.
19. Q. R. to K. B's sq.
And you will checkmate in a few moves.


(A.)

 5. P. takes K. P.
 6. Q. Kt. takes P. 6. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 7. Q. to K's 2d. 7. K. to Q's sq.
 8. K. Kt. to K. B's 3d. 8. Q. to K's 2d.
 9. Q. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th. 9. Q. takes Q. (ch.)
10. B. takes Q.10. K. to his sq.
11. K. Kt. to K's 5th.11. K. B. to K's 2d.
12. K. Kt. to K. B's 7th.12. B. takes Q. Kt.
13. Kt. takes B.13. P. to K. R's 3d.
14. B. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)14. K. to K's 2d.
15. Kt. to K. B's 7th.15. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
16. Kt. takes R.16. Kt. takes B.
17. Kt. to Kt's 6th. (ch.)17. K. to B's 3d.
18. Kt. to K. R's 4th.18. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
19. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
You have the better game.


[173]

GAME THE THIRD.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. P. to Q's 4th.
 4. B. takes P. 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. Q. to K's 2d. 5. Kt. takes B.
 6. P. takes Kt. (dis. ch.) 6. B. to K's 2d.
 7. Q. to K. B's 3d. 7. B. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
 8. P. to K. Kt s 3d. 8. P. takes P.
 9. P. takes P. 9. B. to K. Kt's 4th.
10. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
Even game.


Variation,
Beginning at White's 5th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. P. to Q's 4th.
 4. B. takes P. 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th.
 6. K. Kt. to K's 2d. 6. B. takes Q. Kt.
 7. Q. P. takes B. 7. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 8. B. to Q. B's 4th. 8. Q. takes Q. (ch.)
 9. K. takes Q. 9. Kt. takes K. P.
10. K. to his sq.

The game is about even, since Black must eventually lose the gambit Pawn.


GAME THE FOURTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 4. P. to Q's 4th. 4. P. to Q's 4th.
 5. P. takes P. 5. P. takes P.
 6. K. B. checks. 6. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 7. Q. B. takes P. 7. Q. to her Kt's 3d.
 8. Q. to K's 2d. (ch.) 8. Q. B. to K's 3d.
 9. P. to Q. B's 3d. 9. Castles on Q's side.
10. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
The game is equal.


[174]

GAME THE FIFTH.

Having gone through the probable variations which Black may adopt instead of checking with the Q., at his 3d move, we have now to consider those at his command, (after giving the check,) when he does not play the usual move of 4. P. to K. Kt's 4th.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. Q. checks.
 4. K. to B's sq. 4. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 6. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 6. Q. to K's 2d.
 7. Q. B. takes P. 7. Q. takes K. P.
 8. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.) 8. K. to B's sq.
 9. Q. B. to K. Kt's 3d. 9. K. Kt. to R's 3d.
10. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.10. Q. to K's 2d.
11. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.11. P. to Q. B's 3d.
12. Q. to her 2d.12. P. to Q's 4th.
13. Q. R. to K's sq.
You have the better game.


GAME THE SIXTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. Q. checks.
 4. K. to B's sq. 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. Q. to K. R's 4th.
 6. P. to K. R's 4th. 6. P. to K. Kt's 4th
 7. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 7. P. to K. R's 3d.
 8. P. to K's 5th. 8. Kt. to his sq.
 9. K. B. to K's 2d. 9. P. to Kt's 5th.
10. Kt. to K. R's 2d.10. Q. takes K. P.
11. P. to Q's 4th.
You have the advantage.


[175]

GAME THE SEVENTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. Q. checks.
 4. K. to B's sq. 4. Q. to K. B's 3d.
 5. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 6. P. to Q's 4th. 6. P. to Q's 3d.
 7. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 7. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 8. P. to K. R's 4th. 8. P. to K. R's 3d.
 9. P. to K's 5th. 9. P. takes P.
10. P. takes P.10. Q. to K. Kt's 2d.
11. Q. to her 4th.11. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
12. P. takes Kt. P.12. P. takes P.
13. R. takes R.13. Q. takes R.
14. Kt. takes K. Kt. P.14. Q. to K. R's 8th. (ch.)
15. Q. to K. Kt's sq.15. Q. takes Q. (ch.)
16. K. takes Q.
You have the superiority.


Variation,
Beginning at Black's 5th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. Q. checks.
 4. K. to B's sq. 4. Q. to K. B's 3d.
 5. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
 6. P. to Q's 4th. 6. P. to Q's 3d.
 7. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 7. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 8. P. to K. R's 4th. 8. P. to K. R's 3d.
 9. P. to K's 5th. 9. Q. to K. Kt's 2d.
10. K. R. P. takes P.10. K. R. P. takes P.
11. R. takes R.11. Q. takes R.
12. Q. Kt. to K's 4th.12. P. takes K. P.
13. P. takes P.13. Q. to K. R's 8th. (ch.)
14. K. Kt. to his sq.14. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.
15. Q. Kt. takes P.15. Q. Kt. takes K. P.
16. Q. to K's 2d.
You have the better position.


[176]

GAME THE EIGHTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. Q. checks.
 4. K. to B's sq. 4. P. to Q's 3d.
 5. Q. to K. B's 3d. 5. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 6. P. to K. Kt's 3d. 6. Q. to K. Kt's 5th.
 7. P. to Q's 3d. 7. K. B. to R's 3d.
 8. Q. takes Q. 8. B. takes Q.
 9. P. to K. R's 4th. 9. P. takes R. P.
10. Q. B. takes P.
Even game.


Variation,
Beginning at White's 5th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. Q. checks.
 4. K. to B's sq. 4. P. to Q's 3d.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. Q. B. to K's 3d.
 6. Q. to her 3d. 6. B. takes B.
 7. Q. takes B. 7. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 8. Q. to her Kt's 3d. 8. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 9. Q. to K. R's 3d. 9. Q. takes Q.
10. Kt. takes Q.10. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
11. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.11. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.
The game is even.

[177]

GAMES

ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE KING'S BISHOP'S GAMBIT.

Game I.—Between La Bourdonnais and McDonnell.

Go to PGN_62

 WHITE.  (Mr. McD.)  BLACK.  (M. La B.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th.[A] 3. Q. checks.
 4. K. to B's sq. 4. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 5. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. K. B. to Kt's 2d.
 6. P. to Q's 4th. 6. P. to Q's 3d.
 7. K. B. to K's 2d. 7. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 8. P. to K's 5th. 8. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
 9. Q. Kt. to his 5th. 9. Castles.
10. Q. Kt. takes Q. B. P.10. Q. R. to Q. Kt's sq.
11. K. Kt. to B's 3d.11. Q. to K. R's 3d.
12. P. takes P.12. K. Kt. to K. B's 4th.
13. P. to Q. B's 3d.13. K. Kt. to his 6th. (ch.)
14. P. takes Kt.14. Q. takes R. (ch.)
15. K. to B's 2d.15. P. takes P. (ch.)
16. K. takes P.16. Q. takes Q.
17. B. takes Q.17. P. to K. R's 3d.
18. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.18. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.
19. Q. B. to K's 3d.19. P. to K. B's 4th.
20. P. to Q's 5th.20. P. to K. B's 5th. (ch.)
21. K. to R's 2d.21. P. takes B.
22. P. takes Kt.22. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
23. K. Kt. to Q's 4th.23. B. to K's 4th. (ch.)
24. K. to Kt's sq.24. K. B. takes Q. P.
25. Q. Kt. takes P.25. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
26. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.[B]26. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
27. Q. Kt. to Q's 6th.27. K. B. takes K. Kt.
28. P. takes B.28. Q. R. takes Kt. P.
29. Kt. takes B.29. K. R. takes Kt.
30. P. to Q's 5th.30. K. to B's 2d.
31. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.31. K. to K's 2d.
32. K. to B's sq.32. Q. R. to K's 5th.
33. K. to his 2d.33. K. R. to K. B's sq.
34. K. to Q's 3d.34. Q. R. to K's 4th.
35. R. to K's sq.35. K. to Q's 3d.[C]
36. R. takes P.36. R. takes R. (ch.)
37. K. takes R.37. P. to K. R's 4th.
38. K. to his 4th.38. P. to K. R's 5th.
39. B. to Q's sq.39. P. to K. R's 6th.
40. P. takes P.40. P. takes P.
41. B. to K. B's 3d.41. P. to K. R's 7th.
42. B. to K. Kt's 2d.42. R. to K. B's 8th.
Mr. McDonnell resigned.

[A] This was a favorite opening of McDonnell's; he bestowed much time and labor on its analyses, and discovered many skilful methods of diversifying the attack.

[B] Q. B. to K's 2d would have been better play we believe.

[C] This game is very cleverly played by La Bourdonnais.



[178]

Game II.—Between the same players.

Go to PGN_63

 WHITE.  (Mr. McD.)  BLACK.  (M. La B.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. Q. checks.
 4. K. to B's sq. 4. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 5. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. K. B. to Kt's 2d.
 6. P. to Q's 4th. 6. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 7. P. to K's 5th. 7. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
 8. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 8. Q. to K. R's 4th.
 9. Q. Kt. to K's 4th. 9. P. to K. R's 3d.
10. Kt. to K. B's 6th. (ch.)10. B. takes Kt.
11. P. takes B.11. P. to Q's 4th.
12. B. to Q's 3d.12. K. Kt. to B's 4th.
13. Q. to K's sq. (ch.)13. K. to Q's sq.
14. Kt. to K's 5th.14. K. Kt. takes Q. P.[A]
15. P. to Q. B's 3d.15. Q. Kt. takes Kt.
16. Q. takes Kt.16. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
17. Q. takes Q. P. (ch.)17. K. to his sq.
18. B. to Q. Kt's 5th.[B]18. Q. B. to K's 3d.
19. B. takes Kt. (ch.)19. K. to K. B's sq.
20. Q. to B's 5th. (ch.)20. K. to Kt's sq.
21. B. to K. B's 3d.21. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.
22. Q. to Q's 4th.22. P. to Q. B's 4th.
23. Q. to K's 5th.23. Q. R. to K's sq.
24. K. B. to K's 2d.[C]24. P. to K. B's 6th.
25. K. to B's 2d.[D]25. P. takes B.
26. Q. B. to K's 3d.26. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.
27. P. to K. R's 4th.27. Q. B. to Q's 2d.
28. Q. to her 5th.28. Q. takes P. (ch.)
29. K. takes P.29. B. to K. Kt's 5th. (ch.)
30. K. to Q's 2d.30. R. to Q's sq.
And White resigned.

[A] Had Black checked with his Kt. and taken the Rook, he would have been mated in five moves.

[B] This portion of the game is played by Mr. McDonnell with great judgment.

[C] It would have been better to take the Q. B. P. with Q.

[D] It is obvious he would have lost his Q. by taking the P.



Game III.—Between Mr. Perigal and an Amateur.

Go to PGN_64

 WHITE.  (Mr. P.)  BLACK.  (Mr. ——)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. Q. checks.
 4. K. to B's sq. 4. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 5. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. B. to K. Kt's 2d.
 6. P. to K. Kt's 3d. 6. P. takes P.
 7. K. to Kt's 2d. 7. K. B. takes Kt.[A]
 8. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 8. Q. to Kt's 5th.
 9. B. takes B. P. (ch.) 9. K. to B's sq.[B]
10. P. to K. R's 3d.10. Q. takes K. P.
11. Q. P. takes B.11. K. takes B.
12. K. R. to K's sq.12. Q. to her B's 3d.
13. Q. to her 4th.13. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
14. Q. B. takes K. Kt. P.14. R. to K's sq.
15. R. takes R.15. Kt. takes R.
16. Q. to K. B's 4th. (ch.)16. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
17. K. takes P.17. Q. to her 3d.
18. Kt. to K's 5th. (ch.)18. K. to Kt's 2d.
19. B. to R's 6th. (ch.)19. K. to Kt's sq.
White mates in two moves.

[A] This is not advisable play.

[B] Taking the Bishop would evidently involve the loss of the Queen.



[179]

Game IV.—Played some years ago between one of the best
players of the day and Mr. Staunton.

Go to PGN_65

 WHITE.  (Mr. ——)  BLACK.  (Mr. S.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. P. to Q's 4th.
 4. P. takes P.[A] 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. Q. to K. B's 3d. 5. K. B. to Q's 3d.
 6. P. to K. R's 3d. 6. Castles.
 7. P. to Q. B's 3d. 7. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 8. P. takes P. 8. Q. Kt. takes P.
 9. P. to Q's 4th. 9. K. Kt. to K's 5th.
10. Q. B. takes P.10. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
11. P. to K. Kt's 3d.11. K. Kt. takes P.
12. Q. B. takes K. B.12. Kt. takes R. (dis. ch.)
13. K. to B's sq.13. Q. B. to K's 3d.
14. K. B. to Q's 3d.14. Q. R. to Q's sq.
15. Q. B. to K. R's 2d.15. Q. B. to Q's 4th.
16. Q. to K. B's 4th.16. Q. to K. R's 4th.
17. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.17. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.
18. P. to Q. B's 4th.18. Q. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d.
19. Q. to K. Kt's 4th.19. Q. to K. R's 3d.
20. Q. R. to Q's sq.20. Q. to K's 6th.
21. Q. to K. B's 5th.21. B. to K. Kt's 7th. (ch.)
22. K. takes B.22. Kt. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
And Black wins.

[A] It is better to take the Pawn with the Bishop.



[180]

Game V.—Between MM. Kieseritzky and Desloges.

Go to PGN_66

 WHITE.  (M. D.)  BLACK.  (M. K.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. B. to Q. B's 4th. 3. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.
 4. B. takes Kt. P. 4. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
 5. K. to B's sq. 5. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 6. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 6. Q. to K. R's 4th.
 7. K. B. to K's 2d. 7. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
 8. Kt. to Q's 4th. 8. P. to Q's 3d.
 9. P. to K. R's 3d. 9. K. B. to Kt's 2d.
10. K. Kt. to Q. Kt's 3d.10. P. to K. B's 6th.
11. P. takes P.11. P. takes K. R. P.
12. P. to K. B's 4th.12. Q. to K. R's 5th.
13. P. to Q's 3d.13. P. to K. R's 7th.
14. K. B. to B's 3d.14. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
15. P. to Q's 4th.15. Q. B. to Q. R's 3d. (ch.)
16. K. to Kt's 2d.16. K. Kt. to R's 3d.
17. R. takes P.17. Q. to K. B's 3d.
18. Q. B. to K's 3d.18. K. R. to Kt's sq.
19. Q. to K. R's sq.19. Kt. takes Q. P.
20. Kt. takes Kt.20. Q. takes Kt.
21. B. takes Q.21. B. takes B. (dis. ch.)
22. K. to R's 3d.22. Q. B. to his sq. (ch.)
23. K. to R's 4th.23. K. B. to his 3d. (ch.)
24. K. to R's 5th.24. R. to K. Kt's 3d.
25. R. to K. Kt's 2d.25. Kt. to his sq.
26. P. to K. B's 5th.26. R. to his 3d. (ch.)
27. K. to Kt's 4th.27. R. takes Q.
28. P. to Q. B's 3d.28. K. B. to K's 4th.
29. K. B. to K's 2d.29. Kt. to K. B's 3d. (ch.)
30. K. to his B's 3d.30. Kt. takes K. P.
31. R. to Kt's 8th. (ch.)31. K. to his 2d.
32. R. takes Q. B.32. Kt. to K. Kt's 4th. (ch.)
33. K. to Kt's 4th.33. P. to K. R's 4th. (ch.)
34. K. takes Kt.34. P. to B's 3d. (ch.)
35. K. to Kt's 6th.35. R. to K. Kt's 8th. (ch.)
36. K. to R's 7th.36. Q. R. takes R.
37. P. to Q. R's 3d.37. Q. R. to K. Kt's sq.
38. B. to Q. B's 4th.
And Black mates in three moves.


The Gambit Declined.

If Black does not choose to accept the Gambit, he has several modes of defence, which may be briefly noticed.

[181]

GAME THE FIRST.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. P. to K. B's 4th.2. B. to Q. B's 4th.
This appears to be Black's best move, if he declines taking P. with P.
3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.3. P. to Q's 3d.
4. P. to Q. B's 3d.4. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
5. B. to K's 2d. (best)5. B. takes Kt.
6. B. takes B.6. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
7. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.7. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
8. P. to Q. Kt's 5th.8. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.
9. P. to Q's 4th.
And the position is, perhaps, a little in your favor.


Variation,
Beginning at White's 5th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to Q's 3d.
 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. P. takes P.
 6. P. takes P. 6. B. takes Kt.
 7. P. takes B. 7. Q. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
 8. K. to his 2d. 8. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 9. B. to K's 3d. 9. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
10. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.10. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
Equal game.


GAME THE SECOND.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. P. to K. B's 4th.2. P. to Q's 3d.
3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.3. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
4. B. to Q. B's 4th.4. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
5. P. to Q. B's 3d.5. B. takes Kt.
6. Q. takes B.6. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
The game is slightly in your favour.


[182]

Variation,
Beginning at White's 3d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. P. to K. B's 4th.2. P. to Q's 3d.
3. B. to Q. B's 4th.3. P. takes P.
4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.4. B. to K's 3d.
5. B. takes B.5. P. takes B.
6. P. to Q's 4th.6. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
7. P. to K. R's 4th.7. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
8. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th.8. Q. to K. B's 3d.
9. Q. takes P.
You have the advantage.


GAME THE THIRD.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. P. to K. B's 4th.2. P. to Q's 4th.
3. P. takes Q. P.3. Q. takes P.
4. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.4. Q. to K's 3d.
5. K. Kt. to B's 3d.5. P. takes P. (dis. ch.)
6. K. to B's 2d.6. P. to Q. B's 3d. (best)
7. P. to Q's 4th.7. B. to Q's 3d.
8. B. to Q's 3d.8. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
9. R. to K's sq.
You have a fine game.


Variation,
Beginning at Black's 3d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. to Q's 4th.
 3. P. takes Q. P. 3. P. takes K. B. P.
 4. B to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.) 4. B. to Q's 2d.
 5. Q. to K's 2d. (ch.) 5. Q. to K's 2d.
 6. Kt. to Q. B's 3d. 6. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
 7. B. takes B. (ch.) 7. Q. Kt. takes B.
 8. P. to Q's 4th. 8. Castles.
 9. Q. takes Q. 9. B. takes Q.
10. B. takes P.10. Q. Kt. to his 3d.
Equal game.

[183]

GAMES

ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE KING'S GAMBIT DECLINED.

Game I.—Played by Mr. Morphy without seeing the
Chess-board or men, against M. Bornemann.

Go to PGN_67

 WHITE.  (Mr. M.)  BLACK.  (M. B.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. K. Kt. to K. B's 3d. 3. P. to Q's 3d.
 4. P. to Q. B's 3d. 4. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
 5. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 5. K. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
 6. P. takes P. 6. B. takes Kt.
 7. Q. takes B. 7. Q. P. takes P.
 8. P. to Q's 3d. 8. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
 9. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th. 9. P. to Q. R's 3d.
10. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.10. B. to K's 2d.
11. Castles on Q's side.11. Q. to Q's 2d.
12. Kt. to K. B's sq.12. Castles on Q's side.
13. Kt. to K's 3d.13. P. to K. R's 3d.
14. Q. B. to K. R's 4th.14. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
15. Q. B. to K. Kt's 3d.15. Q. R. to K. B's sq.
16. Kt. to Q's 5th.16. K. Kt. to K's sq.
17. P. to Q's 4th.17. P. takes Q. P.
18. P. takes P.18. K. Kt. to Q's 3d.
19. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.19. B. to Q's sq.
20. K. R. to K. B's sq.20. K. Kt. to Q. Kt's 4th.
21. Q. to K's 3d.21. P. to K. B's 4th.
22. P. takes P.22. Q. R. takes P.
23. Kt. to Q. Kt's 6th. (ch.)[A]23. P. takes Kt.
24. K. B. to K's 6th.24. Q. R. to Q's 4th.
25. K. R. to K. B's 7th.25. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.
26. K. to Q. Kt's sq.26. K. R. to K's sq.
27. Q. R. to Q. B's sq. (ch.)27. K. Kt. to Q. B's 2d.
28. K. B. takes Q. (ch.)28. Q. R. takes B.
29. P. to Q's 5th.[B]29. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
30. P. takes Kt.30. K. R. takes Q.
31. P. takes Q. R. (ch.)

And Black gives up the battle, after fighting for above nine hours.

[A] A manœuvre altogether unforeseen by M. Bornemann.

[B] Capitally played. Black can take it only at the expense of a Piece.



[184]

Game II.—Played at the Philadelphia AthenŠum, between
Messrs. H. P. Montgomery and W. R. McAdam, at odds of Knight.

Remove White Queen's Knight.

Go to PGN_68

 WHITE.  (Mr. M.)  BLACK.  (Mr. McA.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to Q's 3d.
 4. P. to K. R's 3d. 4. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 6. Q. to Q. B's 2d. 6. Castles.
 7. P. to Q. Kt's 4th. 7. B to Q. Kt's 3d.
 8. P. to Q. Kt's 5th. 8. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.
 9. P. takes P. 9. P. takes P.
10. Kt. takes P.10. Q. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d.
11. Kt. to K. B's 3d.11. Q. to K's 2d.
12. P. to Q's 3d.12. K. Kt. to Q's 4th.
13. B. to K's 2d.13. K. Kt. to K's 6th.
14. Q. B. takes Kt.14. B. takes B.
15. P. to Q's 4th.15. P. to K. B's 4th.
16. P. to K's 5th.16. P. to K. B's 5th.
17. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. (ch.)17. K. to R's sq.
18. P. to K. R's 4th.18. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.
19. Q. to K's 2d.19. Q. to Q. R's 6th.
20. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.20. Kt. to K's 2d.
21. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th.21. B. to K. Kt's 3d.
22. P. to K. R's 5th.22. B. to K. B's 4th.
23. P. to K. R's 6th.23. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
24. P. to K. Kt's 4th.24. Q. to Q. R's 4th.
25. Q. to Q. B's 4th.25. Q. B. takes P.
26. P. to Q's 5th.26. Kt. takes P.
27. R. to Q. B's sq.27. B. takes R.
28. Q. takes Kt.28. Q. takes P. (ch.)
29. K. to B's sq.29. B. checks.
30. K. takes B.30. Q. to K's 6th. (ch.)
31. K. to B's sq.31. B. to Q's 7th.
32. Q. to K. Kt's 8th. (ch.)32. R. takes Q.
33. Kt. mates.

[TABLE OF CONTENTS]

[185]

CHAPTER V.

THE QUEEN'S GAMBIT.

GAME THE FIRST.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to Q's 4th.1. P. to Q's 4th.
2. P. to Q. B's 4th.2. P. takes P.
These moves form the Queen's Gambit.
3. P. to K's 3d.3. P. to K's 4th.
4. K. B. takes P.4. P. takes Q. P.
5. P. takes P.5. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
6. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.6. K. B. to Q's 3d.
7. K. Kt. to B's 3d.7. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
8. Castles.8. Castles.
9. P. to K. R's 3d.9. P. to K. R's 3d.

The game is equal; but your P. is well placed, and you have still the move.

Variation,
Beginning at Black's 3d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to Q's 4th. 1. P. to Q's 4th.
 2. P. to Q. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. P. to K's 3d. 3. P. to Q. B's 4th.
 4. B. takes P. 4. P. takes Q. P.
 5. P. takes P. 5. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 6. K. Kt. to K's 2d. 6. P. to K's 4th.
 7. Q. B. to K's 3d. 7. P. takes P.
 8. Kt. takes P. 8. Kt. takes Kt.
 9. B. takes Kt. 9. Q. to K's 2d. (ch.)
10. K. B. to K's 2d.10. Q. to her Kt's 5th. (ch.)
11. Q. to her 2d.11. Q. takes Q. (ch.)
12. Kt. takes Q.12. Kt. to K's 2d.
You have the superiority.


[186]

GAME THE SECOND.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to Q's 4th.1. P. to Q's 4th.
2. P. to Q. B's 4th.2. P. takes P.
3. P. to K's 4th.3. P. to K's 4th.
4. P. to Q's 5th.4. P. to K. B's 4th.
5. K. B. takes P.5. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
6. K. Kt. to B's 3d.6. K. B. to Q's 3d.
7. P. takes P.7. Q. B. takes P.
8. Castles.8. Castles.
9. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.9. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.

The positions are pretty equal, but you have still an advantage in the move.


GAME THE THIRD.

Before proceeding to the consideration of games wherein Black refuses the gambit, it may be well to give a brief example of a different mode of carrying on the opening in the regular gambit which is at your command, and often adopted.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to Q's 4th.1. P. to Q's 4th.
2. P. to Q. B's 4th.2. P. takes P.
3. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
4. P. to K's 3d.4. P. to K's 4th.
5. K. B. takes P.5. P. takes P.
6. P. takes P.6. K. B. to Q's 3d.
The game may be called even.


[187]

Variation,
Beginning at Black's 3d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P to Q's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. P. to Q. B's 4th.2. P. takes P.
3. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.3. P. to Q. B's 4th.
4. P. to Q's 5th.4. P. to K's 3d.
5. P. to K's 4th.5. P. takes P.
6. P. takes P.6. K. B. to Q's 3d
7. K. B. takes P.7. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
Equal game.


GAME THE FOURTH.

The Schwartz Defence.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to Q's 4th. 1. P. to Q's 4th.
 2. P. to Q. B's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. P. to K's 4th. 3. P. to K. B's 4th.
 4. P. to K's 5th. 4. Q. B. to K's 3d.
 5. Q. Kt. to R's 3d. 5. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 6. Q. B. to K's 3d. 6. Q. Kt. to R's 4th.
 7. Q. to Q. R's 4th. (ch.) 7. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 8. B. to Q's 2d. 8. Q. takes Q. P.
 9. Q. takes Kt. 9. Q. takes Q. Kt. P.
10. Q. B. to his 3d.10. Q. to her Kt's 3d.
11. Q. takes Q.11. P. takes Q.
12. Q. Kt. takes P.12. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.
13. Q. Kt. to K's 3d.13. P. to K. B's 5th.
14. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 2d.14. R. takes P.
15. K. B. to Q's 3d.15. R. takes R. (ch.)
16. B. takes R.
You have much the better game.


[188]

The Gambit Refused.

This opening is frequently adopted by the best players. The following games show the conduct of offence and defence by celebrated masters:

Between H. N. Pillsbury and Carl Schlechter.

Go to PGN_69

 WHITE.  (Mr. P.)  BLACK.  (Mr. S.)
 1. P. to Q's 4th. 1. P. to Q's 4th.
 2. P. to Q. B's 4th. 2. P. to K's 3d.
 3. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. B. to Kt's 5th. 4. B. to K's 2d.
 5. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.
 6. P. to K's 3d. 6. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 7. R. to B's sq.[A] 7. B. to Kt's 2d.
 8. P. takes P. 8. P. takes P.
 9. B. to Q's 3d. 9. Castles.
10. Castles.10. P. to B's 4th.
11. B. to Q. Kt's sq.[B]11. Kt. to K's 5th.[C]
12. B. to B's 4th.12. Kt. takes Kt.
13. R. takes Kt.13. P. to B's 5th.
14. Kt. to K's 5th.14. P. to B's 4th.[D]
15. K. to R's sq.15. Kt. takes Kt.
16. B. takes Kt.16. B. to Q's 3d.
17. P. to B's 4th.17. B. to B's sq.[E]
18. Q. to R's 5th.18. P. to Q. R's 3d.
19. R. to K. B's 3d.19. R. to R's 2d.
20. R. to K. R's 3d.20. P. to Kt's 3d.
21. Q. to R's 6th.21. B. takes B.
22. B. P. takes B.22. R. to K. Kt's 2d.
23. R. to K. B's 3d.23. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.
24. R. to Q. B's sq.24. Q. to K's 2d.[F]
25. Q. R. to K. B's sq.25. R. (B. sq.) to B's 2d.
26. P. to K. R's 4th.26. B. to K's 3d.
27. P. to K. Kt's 4th.[G]27. Q. to Q's 2d.[H]
28. P. takes P.28. P. takes P.
29. Q. to R's 5th.29. R. to Kt's 3d.
30. B. takes P.30. B. takes B.
31. R. takes B.31. R. takes R.
32. R. takes R.32. P. to Kt's 5th.
33. Q. to B's 3d.33. P. to B's 6th
34. P. takes P.34. P. takes P.
35. R. to B's 8th. (ch.)35. K. to Kt's 2d.
36. R. to Q. Kt's 8th.36. Q. to K's 2d.
37. Q. to B's 4th.37. P. to K. R's 4th.
38. P. to K's 6th.[I]38. R. takes P.
39. R. to Q. B's 8th.39. R. to K's 5th.[J]
40. R. to B's 7th.40. R. takes Q.
41. R. takes Q. (ch.)41. R. to B's 2d.
42. R. to K's 5th.42. P. to B's 7th.
43. R. to Kt's 5th. (ch.)43. K. to R's 3d.
44. R. to Kt's sq.44. R. to Q. Kt's 2d.
White resigns.

[189]

[A] Notes by W. Steinitz.—White's game has been modelled chiefly after Steinitz's favorite attack. Here, however, 7. P. takes P. is preferable, for if 7... P. takes P; 8. B. to Kt's 5th, B. to Kt's 2d; 9. Kt. to K's 5th, with a strong attack.

[B] As often shown in my annotations in similar positions, it is absolutely injurious to White's game to allow three well-supportable Pawns against two to be established on the Queen's side. The prospect of a King's side attack on which White speculates is quite unreliable in comparison to the disadvantage on the Queen's side to which he is subjected. At any rate, Pawns ought to be exchanged first, and thus Black's centre weakened.

[C] It was better to make sure of his superiority on the Queen's side by P. to B's 5th at once.

[D] He had sufficient force on the King's side to ignore any hostile attack in that direction, and systematic operations on the other wing, commencing with P. to Q. Kt's 4th, were most in order.

[E] The combination of this with the next five moves, more especially with the two closely following, is full of high ingenuity, which, however, is wasted on an imaginary danger. For all purposes of defence it was only necessary to advance P. to K. Kt's 3d at the right time, and then to play R. to B's 2d, followed by B. to K. B's sq. eventually. The Queen's wing was still the proper point of attack to which he should have directed his attention more promptly.

[F] For aggressive purposes on the Queen's side, the Queen was better placed at B's 2d.

[G] This rash attack and Black's timid reply were only to be accounted for as results of time pressure on both sides.

[H] There was not the slightest danger in capturing the Pawn with a Pawn ahead, while this loses one.

[I] A fatal miscalculation. R. to Q. B's 8th led to a most probable draw, for if 38... R. to Kt's 5th; 39. Q. to B's 6th (ch.), &c.

[J] Black seizes his opportunity with scientific exactitude.



[190]

Between Frank J. Marshall and D. Janowsky.

Go to PGN_70

 WHITE.  (Mr. M.)  BLACK.  (Mr. J.)
 1. P. to Q's 4th. 1. P. to Q's 4th.
 2. P. to Q. B's 4th. 2. P. to K's 3d.
 3. Kt. to Q. B's 3d. 3. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
 4. B. to Kt's 5th. 4. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.
 5. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. B. to K's 2d.
 6. P. to K's 3d. 6. Castles.
 7. K. to B's sq.[A] 7. R. to K's sq.[B]
 8. B. to Q's 3d. 8. P. takes P.
 9. B. takes P. 9. P. to Q. R's 3d.[C]
10. Castles.[D]10. P. to Kt's 4th.
11. B. to Q's 3d.11. B. to Kt's 2d.
12. Q. to K's 2d.12. P. to B's 4th.
13. P. takes P.[E]13. Kt. takes P.
14. B. to B's 2d.[F]14. Kt. to Q's 4th.
15. B. takes B.15. Q. takes B.
16. Kt. takes Kt.16. B. takes Kt.
17. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.17. Q. R. to B's sq.
18. P. to K's 4th.18. B. to Kt's 2d.
19. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.[G]19. Kt. to Q's 2d.
20. K. R. to Q's sq.20. Kt. to B's sq.
21. P. to Q. R's 3d.21. R. to B's 6th.[H]
22. B. to Q's 3d.22. K. R. to B's sq.[I]
23. R. takes R.23. R. takes R.
24. Q. to Kt's 2d.24. R to B's sq.[J]
25. R. to Q. B's sq.25. R. to Q's sq.[K]
26. B. to Kt's sq.26. Kt. to Q's 2d.[L]
27. Q. to Q's 4th.27. Kt. to B's 3d.
28. Q. to K's 5th.28. Kt. to Kt's 5th.
29. Q. to B's 4th.29. Kt. to B's 3d.
30. P. to R's 3d.30. Kt. to K's sq.
31. Kt. to K's 5th.31. Kt. to Q's 3d.
32. Kt. to Kt's 4th.32. Kt. to B's 5th.[M]
33. P. to K's 5th.33. K. to R's sq.
34. Kt. to B's 6th.34. P. takes Kt.[N]
35. Q. to R's 4th.[O]35. Resigns.

[191]

[A] Marshall abandons his favorite variation 7. Q. to B's 2d.

[B] Janowsky also changes P. to B's 4th, played in the earlier games.

[C] Janowsky's favorite manœuvre, which might have been expected. Therefore Marshall could have played P. takes P. previous to B. to Q's 3d.

[D] P. to Q. R's 4th would have prevented the Bishop being dislodged; but as he manages eventually to prevent Black from keeping the majority of Pawns on the Queen's side, there is nothing to be said against it—except that he only keeps about an even game.

[E] This is compulsory, because of the threat P. to B's 5th, followed by P. to Kt's 5th.

[F] B. to Kt's sq. might be followed by P. to Kt's 5th, when Q. to K's sq. would take up the place which the K. R. intends to occupy; but the move would have been better, nevertheless.

[G] It is doubtful whether the advance might not have been dispensed with, because of the threat Kt. to Q's 2d, Kt's 3d, and B's 5th eventually. But Marshall plays still for attack, not content with a draw in an even position.

[H] Black has now the better game.

[I] Better would have been 22... Q. to B's 2d 23. Q. to Kt's 2d, K. R. to B's sq.; 24. R. takes Q., Q. takes R., with the command of the open file.

[J] Notes By L. Hoffer.—Q. to B's 2d could be played here.

[K] An alternative would be 25... Q. to B's 3d; 26. P. to K's 5th, Q. to Q's sq.; 27. R. takes R., Q. takes R.; 28. Q. to B's 2d, Q. takes Q.; 29. B. takes Q., Kt. to Q's 2d, winning the K. P.

[L] Q. to Q's 3d or Q. to B's 2d could be played. The text move gives White a chance to bring his Queen effectively into play.

[M] Kt. to K's sq. would have been safer.

[N] Marshall did not expect this complaisance, and Janowsky would not have obliged him had he seen the fatal 35. Q. to R's 4th. 34... Kt. takes K. P. should have been played.

[O] Marshall risked losing the game in trying to win. His boldness was rewarded, but the verdict should be: Don't try it again.


[TABLE OF CONTENTS]

[192]

CHAPTER VI.

IRREGULAR OPENINGS.

GAME THE FIRST.

The French Game.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to K's 3d.
These two moves begin the "French Game."
2. P. to Q's 4th. (best)2. P. to Q's 4th.
3. P. takes P. (best)3. P. takes P.
4. P. to Q. B's 4th.4. K. B. checks.
5. B. to Q's 2d.5. Q. to K's 2d. (ch.)
6. Q. to K's 2d.6. Q. B. to K's 3d.
7. P. takes P.7. B. takes B. (ch.)
8. Q. Kt. takes B.8. B. takes P.
The game is equal.


Variation,
Beginning at White's 2d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 3d.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. to Q's 4th.
 3. P. takes P. 3. P. takes P.
 4. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 4. P. to Q. B's 4th.
 5. P. to Q's 4th. 5. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 6. P. to Q. B's 3d. 6. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 7. Q. B. to K's 3d. 7. Q. to her Kt's 3d.
 8. Q. to her Kt's 3d. 8. Q. Kt. to R's 4th.
 9. Q. takes Q. 9. P. takes Q.
10. K. B. checks.10. Q. B. to Q's 2d.
11. B. takes B. (ch.)11. K. Kt. takes B.
The game is even.


[193]

GAME THE SECOND.

The Sicilian Game.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to Q. B's 4th.
These moves commence the "Sicilian Game."
Black's move is considered by Staunton the
best reply to White's move, 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 2. P. to K's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. P. to Q's 4th.
 4. P. takes Q. P. 4. K. P. takes P.
 5. P. to Q. B's 4th. 5. P. takes Q. P.
 6. P. takes Q. P. 6. Q. takes P.
 7. Q. takes P. 7. Q. takes Q.
 8. Kt. takes Q. 8. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 9. Kt. to Q. Kt's 3d. 9. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
10. B. to Q. B's 4th.10. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
11. Castles.11. Castles.
Equal game.


GAME THE THIRD.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to Q. B's 4th.
2. P. to Q's 4th.2. P. takes P.
3. Q. takes P.3. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
4. Q. to her sq.4. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
5. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.5. P. to K's 3d.
6. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.6. K. B. to K's 2d.
The game appears to be equal.


GAME THE FOURTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to Q. B's 4th.
2. P. to K. B's 4th.2. P. to K's 3d.
3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.3. P. to Q's 4th.
4. P. to K's 5th.4. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
5. P. to Q. B's 3d.5. P. to K. B's 3d.
6. K. B. to Q's 3d.6. K. Kt. to R's 3d.
7. K. B. to Q. B's 2d.7. Q. to her Kt's 3d.
Black has the advantage.


[194]

Variation,
Beginning at Black's 2d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to Q. B's 4th.
2. P. to K. B's 4th.2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.3. P. to K's 3d.
4. B. to K's 2d.4. P. to Q's 4th.
5. P. to Q's 3d.5. P. takes P.
6. P. takes P.6. Q. takes Q. (ch.)
7. B. takes Q.7. K. Kt. to B's 3d
8. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.8. Q. B. to Q's 2d.
9. Q. B. to K's 3d.9. Castles.
The game is even.


GAME THE FIFTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to Q. B's 4th.
2. P. to Q. B's 4th.2. P. to K's 3d.
3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.3. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
4. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.4. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
5. P. to Q's 3d.5. B. to K. Kt's 2d
6. B. to K's 2d.6. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
I much prefer his game.


GAME THE SIXTH.

The Wing Gambit.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to Q. B's 4th
2. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.2. P. takes P.
3. P. to Q's 4th.3. P. to Q's 4th.
4. P. to K's 5th.4. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.
5. P. to Q. R's 3d.5. P. takes P.
6. Q. B. takes P.6. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
You have no equivalent for the lost Pawn.


[195]

GAME THE SEVENTH.

The Centre Counter Gambit.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to Q's 4th.
2. P. takes P. (best)2. Q. takes P.
3. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.3. Q. to her sq. (best)
4. P. to Q's 4th.4. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.
5. K. Kt. to B's 3d.5. P. to K's 3d.
6. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
You have a better opened game.


Variation I.
Beginning at Black's 2d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to Q's 4th.
 2. P. takes P. 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.) 3. B. to Q's 2d.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.
 5. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d. 5. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
 6. P. to K. B's 3d. 6. Q. B. to his sq.
 7. Q. to K's 2d. 7. P. to Q. R's 3d.
 8. P. to Q. B's 4th. 8. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 9. Q. P. takes P. 9. Q. Kt. takes P.
10. Q. B. P. takes P.10. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th.
11. Q. to K's 3d.11. Q. R. P. takes P.
12. Kt. to K's 2d.12. Kt. takes Kt.
13. K. takes Kt.13. Q. B. to Q. R's 3d.
14. K. R. to Q's sq.14. P. to Q. Kt's 5th. (dis. ch.)
15. P. to Q's 3d.15. P. to K's 3d.
16. P. to Q. R's 3d.
You have a good game, and a Pawn superiority.


[196]

Variation II.
Beginning at Black's 5th move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to Q's 4th.
 2. P. takes P. 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.) 3. B. to Q's 2d.
 4. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.
 5. B. to Q. Kt's 3d. 5. P. to Q. R's 4th.
 6. P. to Q. R's 3d. 6. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
 7. P. to K. B's 3d. 7. B. to his sq.
 8. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 8. Q. B. to Q. R's 3d.
 9. P. to Q's 3d. 9. P. to Q. Kt's 5th.
10. Q. R. P. takes P.10. Q. R. P. takes P.
11. Q. Kt. to R's 4th.11. Q. B. to Q. Kt's 2d.
12. Q. B. to Q's 2d.
Black's position is inferior.


GAME THE EIGHTH.

The Fianchetto.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 4th.1. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.
2. P. to Q's 4th.2. Q. B. to Q. Kt's 2d.
3. K. B. to Q's 3d.3. P. to K's 3d.
4. P. to K. B's 4th.4. P. to Q's 4th.
5. P. to K's 5th.5. P. to Q. B's 4th.
6. P. to Q. B's 3d.6. K. Kt. to K. R's 3d.
The game appears to be equal.


Variation,
Beginning at Black's 3d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 2. P. to Q's 4th. 2. B. to Q. Kt's 2d.
 3. B. to Q's 3d. 3. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
 4. P. to K. B's 4th. 4. B. to K. Kt's 2d.
 5. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. P. to Q's 3d.
 6. Q. B. to K's 3d. 6. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.
 7. P. to Q. B's 4th. 7. P. to K's 3d.
 8. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 8. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
 9. Q. to K's 2d. 9. Castles.
10. Castles on Q's side.10. P. to K. B's 4th.
11. K. Kt. to his 5th.11. P. takes K. P.
12. B. takes P.12. B. takes B.
13. Q. Kt. takes B.
You have the better game.


[197]

GAME THE NINTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to Q's 4th. 1. P. to K. B's 4th.
 2. P. to Q. B's 4th. 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to Q's 3d.
 4. Q. B. to K. B's 4th. 4. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 5. P. to K's 3d. 5. Q. to her B's 2d.
 6. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 6. K. Kt. to K. R's 4th.
 7. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th. 7. P. to K. R's 3d.
 8. B. to K. R's 4th. 8. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
 9. K. Kt. to Q's 2d. 9. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
10. B. to K. Kt's 3d.10. P. to K's 4th.
Equal game.


Variation I.
Beginning at White's 2d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to Q's 4th.1. P. to K. B's 4th.
2. P. to K's 4th.2. P. takes P.
3. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.3. K. Kt. to B's 3d
4. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.4. P. to Q. B's 3d.
5. B. takes Kt.5. K. P. takes B.
6. Q. Kt. takes K. P.6. P. to Q's 4th.
7. Q. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d.7. B. to Q's 3d.
8. B. to Q's 3d.8. Castles.
I prefer your position.


[198]

Variation II.
Beginning at White's 2d move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to Q's 4th.1. P. to K. B's 4th.
2. P. to K. R's 3d.2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
3. P. to K. Kt's 4th.3. P. to Q's 4th. (best)
4. P. to K. Kt's 5th.4. K. Kt. to K's 5th.
5. P. to K. R's 4th.5. P. to Q. B's 4th.
6. P. to Q. B's 3d.6. P. to K's 3d.
7. K. Kt. to B's 3d.7. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
8. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.8. K. B. to Q's 3d.
9. B. takes B.9. Q. takes B.
Even game.


GAME THE TENTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to Q's 4th.1. P. to Q. B's 4th.
2. P. to Q's 5th.2. P. to K's 4th.
3. P. to Q. B's 4th.3. P. to K. B's 4th.
4. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.4. P. to Q's 3d.
You have the advantage.


GAME THE ELEVENTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K. B's 4th.1. P. to Q's 4th.
2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.2. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
3. K. Kt. to K's 5th.3. B. to K. B's 4th.
4. P. to K. Kt's 4th.4. P. to K's 3d.
5. P. to K. Kt's 5th.5. P. to K. B's 3d.
6. Kt. to K. B's 3d.6. P. takes P.
7. Kt. takes P.7. K. B. to K's 2d.
8. P. to K. R's 4th.8. P. to K. R's 3d.
9. Kt. to K. B's 3d.9. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.

Black has the better game, owing to your premature attack at the 4th move.


[199]

GAME THE TWELFTH.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to Q. B's 4th. 1. P. to Q. B's 4th.
 2. P. to K. B's 4th. 2. P. to K. B's 4th.
 3. P. to Q's 3d. 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 4. P. to Q's 3d.
 5. P. to K's 4th. 5. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 6. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 6. P. to K's 4th.
 7. B. to Q's 2d. 7. Q. to K's 2d.
 8. P. to Q. R's 3d. 8. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
 9. P. to K. Kt's 3d. 9. K. B. to Kt's 2d.
10. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th.10. Kt. takes Kt.
11. Q. B. P. takes Kt.11. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th.
12. Kt. takes Kt.12. Q. B. P. takes Kt.
Equal game.


Variation,
Beginning at Black's 1st move.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to Q. B's 4th.1. P. to K's 4th.
2. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.2. P. to K. B's 4th.
3. P. to K's 3d.3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
4. P. to Q's 4th.4. P. to K's 5th.
5. K. Kt. to R's 3d.
You have the advantage in position.



French Defence.
Game I.—Between Drs. Lasker and Tarrasch.

Go to PGN_71

 WHITE.  (Dr. L.)  BLACK.  (Dr. T.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 3d.
 2. P. to Q's 4th. 2. P. to Q's 4th.
 3. Kt. to Q. B's 3d. 3. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
 4. B. to Kt's 5th. 4. B to Kt's 5th.
 5. P. takes P. 5. Q. takes P.
 6. Kt. to B's 3d.[A] 6. P. to B's 4th.[B]
 7. B. takes Kt. 7. P. takes B.
 8. Q. to Q's 2d. 8. B. takes Kt.
 9. Q. takes B.[C] 9. Kt. to Q's 2d.
10. R. to Q's sq.10. R. to K. Kt's sq.[D]
11. P. takes P.11. Q. takes P.
12. Q. to Q's 2d.[E]12. Q. to Kt's 3d.[F]
13. P. to B's 3d.13. P. to Q. R's 3d.
14. Q. to B's 2d.14. P. to B's 4th.
15. P. to K. Kt's 3d.15. Kt. to B's 4th.
16. B. to Kt's 2d.16. Q. to B's 2d.
17. Q. to K's 2d.17. P. to Kt's 4th.
18. Castles.18. B. to Kt's 2d.
19. P. to B's 4th.19. P. to Kt's 5th.
20. Q. to Q's 2d.20. R. to Kt's sq.
21. Q. to R's 6th.21. B. takes Kt.
22. B. takes B.22. Q. to K's 4th.
23. K. R. to K's sq.23. Q. takes P.[G]
24. Q. to B's 4th.24. R. to Q. B's sq.
25. Q. to Q's 6th.25. P. to B's 3d.[H]
26. B. to R's 5th. (ch.)26. R. to Kt's 3d.
27. B. takes R. (ch.)27. P. takes B.
28. R. takes P. (ch.)28. Resigns.

[200]

[A] The best line of play against the McCutcheon defence. It was played in a game Sj÷berg vs. Giersing, Stockholm, 1906.

[B] Out of place in this position. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d or Kt. to K's 5th, would be alternatives—the former move in preference.

[C] This excellent move was probably not taken into consideration by Tarrasch when advancing P. to B's 4th.

[D] If 10.., P. takes P., then 11. R. takes P., and Black could not challenge the Queen with 11.., Q. to Q. B's 4th, because of 12. R. to Q. B's 4th. Nor could 10.., K. to K's 2d be played, because of 11. P. takes P., and 11.., Q. takes B. P. would be answered with 12. R. takes Kt. winning the Queen, and as the continuation in the text is hopeless, there remains the only alternative of 10.., Castles, with a good enough game, all things considered.

[E] Simply position play. Black's forces are paralyzed, and the King fixed on the middle of the centre.

[F] Q. to B's 2d at once seems comparatively better, and if necessary Castles, and the case is not altogether hopeless.

[G] Not a judicious capture, to say the least.

[H] This move, or resigning. There is nothing else. The latter course would be more to the purpose, unless a miracle is expected.



Game II.—Played by Mr. Morphy without seeing the Chess-board
or men, against M. Bierwirth.

Go to PGN_72

 WHITE.  (Mr. M.)  BLACK.  (M. B.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 3d.
 2. P. to Q's 4th. 2. P. to Q. B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q's 3d. 3. P. to Q's 4th.
 4. P. takes P. 4. K. P. takes P.
 5. K. Kt. to K. B's 3d. 5. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
 6. Castles. 6. K. B. to Q's 3d.
 7. P. to K. R's 3d. 7. Q. B. to K. R's 4th.
 8. Q. B. to K's 3d. 8. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.
 9. K. R. to K's sq. 9. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
10. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.10. Q. B. takes Kt.
11. Kt. takes B.11. P. to K. R's 3d.
12. Q. to Q's 2d.12. Q. to Q. B's 2d.
13. P. to Q. B's 4th.13. P. takes P.
14. K. B. takes P.14. P. to K. B's 4th.
15. Kt. to K's 5th.15. Castles on Q's side.
16. K. B. to K's 6th.16. B. takes Kt.
17. P. takes B.17. K. to Q. Kt's sq.
18. Q. to Q. B's 3d.[A]18. Q. Kt. to Q. Kt's 3d.
19. Q. to Q. R's 3d.19. Q. Kt. to Q. B's sq.
20. Q. R. to Q. B's sq.20. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
21. P. to K. B's 4th.21. P. takes P.
22. Q. B. takes P.22. Q. R. to Q's 5th.
23. Q. to K's 3d.23. Q. R. to K's 5th.
24. Q. to K. B's 3d.24. Q. to Q. Kt's 3d. (ch.)
25. K. to K. R's 2d.25. Q. R. takes R.
26. R. takes R.26. Q. to Q. Kt's 5th.
27. R. to K's 2d.27. K. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d.
28. Q. B. to Q's 2d.28. Q. to Q. Kt's 4th.
29. K. B. takes Kt.29. R. takes B.
30. B. takes K. R. P.30. R. to K. R's sq.
31. B. to K. Kt's 7th.31. R. to K. R's 2d.
32. B. to K. B's 6th.32. R. to K. B's 2d.
33. Q. to K. R's 5th.33. Kt. to K. B's 5th.
34. Q. takes R.

And Black surrenders, after a struggle of nearly nine hours.

[A] A very ingenious move. If Black take the Pawn with his Queen, he of course loses her by "B. takes Q. R. P. (ch.), etc." and if with the Kt. it costs him at least a Piece.



[201]

Game III.—Played in 1854, between Mr. H. P. Montgomery, of Philadelphia, and Mr. Pindar,
now one of the leading members of the Manchester Chess Club, England.

Go to PGN_73

 WHITE.  (Mr. P.)  BLACK.  (Mr. M.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 3d.
 2. P. to Q's 4th. 2. P. to Q's 4th.
 3. P. takes P. 3. Q. takes P.
 4. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 4. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th.
 5. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 6. K. B. to Q's 3d.[A] 6. P. to Q. B's 4th.[B]
 7. Q. B. to Q's 2d. 7. B. takes Kt.
 8. B. takes B. 8. P. to Q. B's 5th.
 9. K. B. to K's 2d. 9. K. Kt. to K's 5th.
10. Castles.10. Kt. takes B.[C]
11. P. takes Kt.11. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.[D]
12. Kt. to Q's 2d.12. Kt. to Kt's 3d.
13. P. to Q. R's 4th.[E]13. P. to Q. R's 4th.
14. Q. R. to Q. Kt's sq.14. Q. to Q. B's 3d.[F]
15. B. to K. B's 3d.15. Q. to Q. B's 2d.
16. Kt. to K's 4th.16. Kt. takes Q. R. P
17. Q. to Q's 2d.17. Castles.
18. Q. R. to Q. Kt's 5th.[G]18. P. to K. B's 4th.[H]
19. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d.19. Q. R. to Q. Kt's sq
20. P. to Q's 5th.20. Q. to Q's 2d.[I]
21. R. takes Q. R. P.21. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.[J]
22. Q. to K. B's 4th.[K]22. Q. to Q. Kt's 2d.[L]
23. Q. P. takes P.23. Q. to Q. Kt's 3d.
24. P. to K's 7th.24. K. R. to K's sq.
25. K. R. to K's sq.25. B. to K's 3d.[M]
26. R. takes Kt.[N]26. P. takes R.
27. Q. to K's 5th.[O]27. K. R. takes P.
28. Kt. takes P.28. K. R. to K. B's 2d.
29. Kt. to Q's 6th.29. K. R. to K. B's 3d.
30. Kt. to K's 4th.30. K. R. to K. B's 4th.
31. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.31. Q. R. to K. B's sq.[P]
32. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th.32. B. to Q's 4th.
33. B. takes B. (ch.)33. R. takes B.
34. Kt. to K's 6th.34. Q. takes Kt.[Q]
And Black wins.
[202]

[A] A favorite move with several of the strongest of modern players.

[B] If White take P. with P., the Black K. B. is brought into play; and if not, the advance of P. to B's 5th is threatened.

[C] Chiefly to double White's Pawns.

[D] Black foresaw the intended attack on the B. P., and by providing for it in this way brought another Piece into action.

[E] White keeps up the attack on the B. P. with a great deal of vigor. The move of R. P. two was a very good one.

[F] The best move.

[G] The R. is well posted—for attack and defence.

[H] Black has now resumed the offensive.

[I] Threatening to take Q. if P. takes P., and attacking Q. R. at the same time. There was still another motive for this move, viz.: to induce White to take R. P., foreseeing the R. would be lost subsequently.

[J] To enslave the Rook.

[K] An excellent move. In this and the succeeding moves, White played very well. His efforts were directed to saving his R., but, as the result showed, without success.

[L] Apparently hazardous, but justified by the gain of time.

[M] We believe his best move.

[N] White was obliged to lose the exchange, although he fought manfully against it.

[O] Another very good move in White.

[P] Black's advantage in the exchange begins now to tell on the game.

[Q] Threatening mate if R. takes Q.



Game IV.—Played by Correspondence between New York and Philadelphia, in 1857.

Go to PGN_74

 WHITE.  (N.Y.)  BLACK.  (Phila.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to Q. B's 4th.
 2. P. to Q's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to K's 3d.
 4. Q. takes P. 4. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 5. Q. to Q's sq. 5. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 6. K. B. to Q's 3d. 6. K. Kt. to K's 2d.
 7. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 7. P. to Q's 4th.
 8. P. takes P. 8. K. Kt. takes P.
 9. Q. Kt. to K's 4th. 9. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
10. B. to Q. Kt's 5th.10. Castles.
11. K. B. takes Kt.11. P. takes B.
12. Castles.12. P. to K. B's 4th.
13. Q. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d.13. Q. to Q. B's 2d.
14. P. to Q. B's 4th.14. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
15. Q. to Q. B's 2d.15. P. to Q. B's 4th.
16. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.16. B. to Q. Kt's 2d.
17. K. Kt. to Kt's 5th.17. Q. to Q. B's 3d.
18. P. to K. B's 3d.18. B. to Q. B's 2d.
19. K. R. to K's sq.19. Q. R. to K's sq.
20. B. to Q. Kt's 2d.20. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
21. K. R. to K's 2d.21. P. to K's 4th.
22. Q. R. to K's sq.22. P. to K's 5th.
23. P. takes P.23. B. to K. B's 5th.
24. K. Kt. to K. R's 3d.24. B. takes Kt.
25. P. takes B.25. Kt. takes P.
26. Kt. to Kt's 5th.26. Kt. takes Kt.
27. Q. to Q. B's 3d.27. Q. takes K. Kt. P. (ch.)
28. R. takes Q.28. R. takes R. (ch.)
29. Q. takes R.29. Kt. to B's 6th. (ch.)
30. K. to B's sq.30. Kt. takes Q.
31. R. to Q's 2d.31. P. to B's 5th.
32. P. takes P.32. Kt. to K. Kt's 7th.
33. R. to Q's 7th.33. R. takes P. (ch.)
34. K. to Kt's sq.34. B. to K's 5th.
35. R. to K. Kt's 7th. (ch.)35. K. to B's sq.
36. R. takes K. R. P.36. Kt. to K's 6th.
37. R. to K. R's 8th. (ch.)37. K. to B's 2d.
38. B. to K's 5th.38. R. to K. B's 8th. (ch.)
39. K. to K. R's 2d.39. Kt. to K. B's 4th.
40. K. to R's 3d.40. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
41. R. to Q. B's 8th.
And Philadelphia announces mate in six moves.


Game V.—Played by Mr. Morphy without seeing the
Chess-board or men, against M. Preti.

[203]

Go to PGN_75

 WHITE.  (Mr. M.)  BLACK.  (Mr. P.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to Q. B's 4th.
 2. P. to Q's 4th. 2. P. takes P.
 3. K. Kt. to K. B's 3d. 3. P. to K's 4th.
 4. K. B. to Q. B's 4th. 4. K. B. checks.
 5. P. to Q. B's 3d. 5. P. takes P.
 6. P. takes P. 6. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 7. K. Kt. takes K's P. 7. Q. to K. B's 3d.
 8. K. B. takes K. B. P. (ch.) 8. K. to B's sq.
 9. K. Kt. to Q's 3d. 9. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
10. K. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.10. P. to Q's 3d.
11. Q. B. to Q. R's 3d.11. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
12. Castles.12. K. Kt. to K. R's 3d.
13. P. to K's 5th.13. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.
14. K. Kt. to K. B's 4th.14. Q. to K. Kt's 5th.
15. K. Kt. to K's 6th. (ch.)[A]15. Q. B. takes Kt.
16. Q. takes Q. P. (ch.)16. K. to B's 2d.
17. Q. to Q's 7th. (ch.)17. K. to K. Kt's 3d.
18. K. B. takes B.18. Q. to K. Kt's 4th.
19. K. B. to Q's 5th.19. Q. Kt. takes K. P.
20. K. B. to K's 4th. (ch.)20. K. Kt. to K. B's 4th.
21. Q. to K's 6th. (ch.)21. Q. to K. B's 3d.
22. K. B. takes Kt. (ch.)22. K. to K. R's 4th.
23. P. to K. Kt's 4th. (ch.)23. Kt. takes P.
24. K. B. takes Kt. (ch.)
And Black surrenders.

[A] This is more effectual than taking the Queen's Pawn with Queen at once.



[204]

Game VI.—Played at the Philadelphia AthenŠum,
between Mr. Clements and Dr. Lewis.

Go to PGN_76

 WHITE.  (Mr. C.)  BLACK.  (Dr. L.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to Q. B's 4th.
 2. P. to Q's 4th. 2. P. to K's 3d.[A]
 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to Q's 4th.
 4. K. P. takes P. 4. K. P. takes P.
 5. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.) 5. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
 6. Castles. 6. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 7. K. Kt. to K's 5th. 7. Q. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 8. B. takes Kt. (ch.) 8. P. takes B.
 9. R. to K's sq. 9. Q. B. to K's 3d.
10. Q. to K's 2d.[B]10. Q. B. P. takes P.
11. Kt. takes K. B. P.[C]11. K. Kt. to K's 5th.
12. Kt. takes R.12. Castles.
13. Q. to K. B's 3d.13. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
14. R. takes Kt.14. P. takes R.
15. Q. takes P.15. R. to K's sq.
16. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.16. Q. B. to Q's 2d.
17. Q. takes R. (ch.)17. B. takes Q.
18. Kt. P. takes B.18. Q. takes P.
19. Q. B. to R's 3d.19. Q. takes B. P.
20. P. to K. R's 3d.20. P. to Q's 6th.
21. B. to Kt's 4th.21. Q. to her Kt's 7th.
22. B. to Q. B's 3d.22. Q. to Q. B's 8th. (ch.)
23. K. to R's 2d.23. P. to Q. B's 4th.
24. B. to Q's 2d.24. Q. to Q. B's 7th.
25. P. to Q. R's 4th.25. B. to Q. B's 3d.[D]
26. Kt. to K. B's 7th.26. Q. to Q's 8th.
27. Kt. to Q's 6th. (ch.)27. K. to Q's 2d.
28. Kt. to Q. B's 4th.28. B. to K's 5th.
29. B. to Q. B's 3d.29. Q. to Q. B's 7th.
30. K. Kt. to Q's 2d.30. B. to Q's 4th.
31. B. takes P.31. P. to Q. B's 5th.
32. B. to Q. B's 3d.32. Q. to Q's 8th.
33. Kt. to R's 3d.33. Q. to K. R's 4th.
34. Kt. to Q. Kt's 5th.34. Q. to K. Kt's 3d.
35. P. to K. B's 3d.35. P. to K. R's 4th.
36. B. to K's sq.36. P. to K. R's 5th.
37. R. to K's 5th.37. B. to Q. B's 3d.
38. Kt. takes Q. R. P.38. B. takes Q. R. P.
39. Kt. takes Q. B. P.39. B. to Q. Kt's 6th.
40. B. to Q's 5th. (ch.)40. K. to Q. B's 2d.
41. B. to K's 5th. (ch.)41. K. to Q. Kt's 2d.
42. B. to Q's 7th. (ch.)42. K. to R's 3d.
43. B. to Q's 6th. (ch.)43. Q. takes R.
44. B. takes Q.44. B. takes Kt.
45. B. to Q. Kt's 4th.45. K. takes Kt.
46. K. to K. Kt's sq.46. K. to Q. Kt's 3d.
47. B. to Q's 2d.47. K. to Q. B's 4th.
48. K. to K. B's 2d.48. K. to Q's 4th.
49. B. to K's sq.49. K. to K's 4th.
50. K. to K's 3d.50. K. to K. B's 4th.
51. B. takes P.51. P. to Q's 7th.[E]
52. K. takes P.52. K. to K. B's 5th.
53. K. to K's sq.53. B. to Q's 6th.
54. K. to K. B's 2d.54. K. to K. B's 4th.
55. P. to K. Kt's 3d.55. B. to Q. B's 5th.
56. P. to Kt's 4th. (ch.)56. K. to Kt's 3d.
57. P. to K. B's 4th.57. B. to Q's 4th.
58. P. to K. B's 5th. (ch.)58. K. to K. Kt's 2d.
59. P. to K. Kt's 5th.59. B. to K's 5th.
60. P. to K. B's 6th. (ch.)60. K. to Kt's 3d.
61. K. to Kt's 3d.61. B. to Q's 4th.
62. K. to Kt's 4th.62. B. to K's 3d. (ch.)
63. K. to Kt's 3d.
And Black draws the game.

[205]

[A] The proper move.

[B] Well played.

[C] This move, properly followed up, should have given White the game.

[D] Allowing the escape of the Knight.

[E] From this point, we believe Black can draw the game against White's best possible play. The latter part of the game is well played by Black.



[206]

Game VII.—Played in Oct. 1858, between Mr. James Thompson
of New York and Mr. H. P. Montgomery of Philada.

Go to PGN_77

 WHITE.  (Mr. T.)  BLACK.  (Mr. M.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to Q. B's 4th.
 2. P. to Q. B's 4th. 2. P. to K's 4th.
 3. Kt. to Q. B's 3d. 3. P. to K. B's 4th.
 4. P. takes P. 4. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
 5. Kt. to Q's 5th. 5. P. to Q's 3d.
 6. B. to Q's 3d. 6. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
 7. P. to K. Kt's 4th. 7. Kt. takes Kt.
 8. P. takes Kt. 8. Kt. to Q's 5th.
 9. Kt. to B's 3d. 9. P. to K. R's 4th.
10. P. takes R. P.10. Kt. takes K. B. P.
11. B. to Q. Kt's 5th. (ch.)11. B. to Q's 2d.
12. B. takes B. (ch.)12. Q. takes B.
13. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th.13. Kt. to Q's 5th.
14. P. to Q's 3d.14. Q. to K. B's 4th.
15. B. to K's 3d.15. Castles (Q's side.)
16. R. to Q. B's sq.16. B. to K's 2d.
17. B. takes Kt.17. K. P. takes B.
18. Kt. to K's 4th.18. Q. R. to K's sq.
19. R. to K. Kt's sq.19. B. to K. Kt's 4th.
20. Q. to K's 2d.20. Q. to B's 5th.
21. R. to Q. B's 2d.21. B. to B's 3d.
22. P. to K. R's 3d.22. K. to Kt's sq.
23. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.23. Q. to K. R's 7th.
24. Q. to K. Kt's 4th.24. K. R. to K. B's sq.
25. K. to Q's sq.25. R. takes Kt.
26. P. takes R.26. P. to Q's 6th
27. R. to Q's 2d.27. Q. to K's 4th.
28. R. takes Q. P.28. Q. to Q. R's 8th. (ch.)
29. K. to K's 2d.29. Q. takes R. P. (ch.)
30. K. to B's sq.30. P. takes Q. Kt. P.
31. Q. to K's 2d.31. P. to Kt's 6th.
32. R. to Q's sq.32. P. to Kt's 7th.
33. Q. to Q. B's 2d.33. B. to Q's 5th.
34. R. to K. Kt's 2d.34. P. Queens, and wins.


Game VIII.—Between Mr. Morphy and Mr. Anderssen.

Go to PGN_78

 WHITE.  (Mr. M.)  BLACK.  (Mr. A.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to Q's 4th.
 2. P. takes P. 2. Q. takes P.
 3. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. Q. to Q. R's 4th.
 4. P. to Q's 4th. 4. P. to K's 4th.
 5. P. takes P. 5. Q. takes P. (ch.)
 6. K. B. to K's 2d. 6. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th.
 7. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 7. B. takes Kt. (ch.)
 8. P. takes B. 8. Q. takes Q. B. P. (ch.)
 9. Q. B. to Q's 2d. 9. Q. to Q. B's 4th.
10. Q. R. to Q. Kt's sq.10. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
11. Castles.11. K. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
12. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.12. Castles.
13. Q. B. takes Q. B. P.13. Q. Kt. to Q's 5th.
14. Q. takes Kt.14. Q. takes B.
15. B. to Q's 3d.15. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
16. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th.16. K. R. to Q's sq.
17. Q. to Q. Kt's 4th.17. B. to Q. B's sq.
18. K. R. to K's sq.18. P. to Q. R's 4th.
19. Q. to K's 7th.19. Q. takes Q.
20. R. takes Q.20. Kt. to Q's 4th.
21. B. takes K. R. P. (ch.)21. K. to R's sq.
22. R. takes K. B. P.22. Kt. to Q. B's 6th.
23. Q. R. to K's sq.23. Kt. takes Q. R. P.
24. K. R. to K. B's 4th.24. Q. R. to Q. R's 3d.
25. B. to Q's 3d.
And Black resigns.


[207]

Game IX.—Between Mr. Morphy and Mr. Anderssen.

Go to PGN_79

 WHITE.  (Mr. M.)  BLACK.  (Mr. A.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to Q's 4th.
 2. P. takes P. 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. P. to Q's 4th. 3. Kt. takes P.
 4. P. to Q. B's 4th. 4. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
 5. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 5. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.
 6. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 6. P. to K's 3d.
 7. Q. B. to K's 3d. 7. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th.
 8. Q. to Q. Kt's 3d. 8. B. takes Kt. (ch.)
 9. P. takes B. 9. B. to K's 5th.
10. Kt. to Q's 2d.10. B. to Q. B's 3d.
11. K. B. to Q's 3d.11. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.
12. Q. to Q. B's 2d.12. P. to K. R's 3d.
13. Castles.13. Castles.
14. Q. R. to K's sq.14. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.
15. P. to K. R's 3d.15. Q. to Q. B's sq.
16. K. to R's 2d.16. K. to R's sq.
17. K. R. to K. Kt's sq.17. R. to K. Kt's sq.
18. P. to K. Kt's 4th.18. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
19. P. to K. B's 4th.19. Q. to K. B's sq.
20. R. to K. Kt's 3d.20. Q. R. to Q's sq.
21. Kt. to K. B's 3d.21. B. takes Kt.
22. R. takes B.22. Q. to her 3d.
23. K. to Kt's 2d.23. Kt. to K. R's 4th.
24. P. takes P.24. P. takes P.
25. P. takes Kt.25. P. to Kt's 5th.
26. P. takes P.26. R. takes P. (ch.)
27. K. to B's sq.27. P. to K. B's 4th.
28. Q. to K. B's 2d.28. Kt. to K's 4th.
29. P. takes Kt.29. Q. takes B. (ch.)
30. Q. to K's 2d.30. Q. to K's 5th.
31. B. to K. B's 2d.31. Q. to Q. B's 3d.
32. R. to Q's sq.32. R. takes R. (ch.)
33. Q. takes R.33. Q. takes Q. B. P. (ch.)
34. Q. to her 3d.34. Q. takes Q. R. P.
35. R. to K. Kt's 3d.35. Q. to Q. B's 5th.
36. Q. takes Q.36. R. takes Q.
37. R. to K. Kt's 6th.37. R. to Q. B's 3d.
38. P. to Q. B's 4th.38. P. to Q. R's 4th.
39. K. to his 2d.39. R. takes P.
40. R. takes P.40. R. to Q. B's 7th. (ch.)
41. K. to B's 3d.41. P. to Q. R's 5th.
42. R. to K. Kt's 6th.42. R. to Q. B's 5th.
43. R. to K. Kt's sq.43. P. to Q. R's 6th.
44. P. to K's 6th.44. P. to Q. R's 7th.
45. R. to Q. R's sq.45. R. to K's 5th.
46. R. takes P.46. R. takes P.
47. K. to B's 4th.47. R. to Q's 3d.
48. K. takes P.48. R. to Q's 4th. (ch.)
49. K. to Kt's 4th.49. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.
50. R. to Q. R's 8th. (ch.)50. K. to R's 2d.
51. R. to R's 7th.51. R. to Q's 2d.
52. B. to K. Kt's 3d.52. R. to K. Kt's 2d. (ch.)
53. K. to R's 4th.
And Black resigns.


[208]

Game X.—Played at the Philadelphia AthenŠum, March 10, 1859,
between Dr. Jones and Mr. H. P. Montgomery, at the odds of the Pawn and Move.

(Remove Black's King's Bishop's Pawn from the Board.)

Go to PGN_80

 WHITE.  (Dr. J.)  BLACK.  (Mr. M.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to Q's 3d.
 2. P. to Q's 4th. 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. K. B. to Q's 3d. 3. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. Q. B. to K's 3d. 4. P. to K's 4th.
 5. P. to Q's 5th. 5. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.
 6. K. Kt. to K's 2d. 6. Q. Kt. to Kt's 3d.
 7. P. to K. R's 3d. 7. Q. Kt. to K. R's 5th.
 8. Castles. 8. Q. B. takes K. R. P.
 9. P. takes B. 9. Kt. to K. B's 6th. (ch.)
10. K. to Kt's 2d.10. Kt. to R's 5th. (ch.)
11. K. to R's sq.11. Q. to Q's 2d.
12. Kt. to his sq.12. P. to K. R's 3d.
13. P. to K. B's 4th.13. P. takes P.
14. B. takes P.14. Castles.
15. B. to K. R's 2d.15. K. B. to K's 2d.
16. Q. Kt. to B's 3d.16. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
17. K. B. to Q. Kt's 5th.17. P. to Q. B's 3d.
18. P. takes P.18. P. takes P.
19. B. to K's 2d.19. P. to K. R's 4th.
20. P. to K's 5th.20. Kt. to K. R's 2d.
21. B. takes K. R. P.21. K. to Q. Kt's sq.
22. B. to K. Kt's 4th.22. Q. to Q. Kt's 2d.
23. B. to K. B's 3d.23. P. to Q's 4th.
24. Q. to K's 2d.24. K. R. to K. B's sq.
25. Q. to Q's 3d.25. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
26. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.26. P. to K. Kt's 5th.
27. B. takes P.27. Kt. to K. Kt's 4th.
28. Q. to Q. Kt's 3d.28. B. to Q. Kt's 3d.
29. Q. B. to K. Kt's 3d.29. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d.
30. K. R. to K. B's 6th.30. R. takes R.
31. P. takes R. (dis. ch.)31. K. to Q. R's sq.
32. Q. to her 3d.32. Kt. to K's 5th.
33. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.33. Kt. to K's 4th.
34. Q. to her sq.34. Kt. takes K. B.
35. P. takes Kt.35. R. to K. R's sq. (ch.)
36. K. to Kt's 2d.36. Q. to K. R's 2d.
37. Q. to her 3d.37. Q. to R's 8th. (ch.)
38. K. to K. B's sq.38. R. to K. B's sq.
39. B. to K's 5th.39. Kt. takes P.
40. B. to Q's 6th.40. R. to B's 2d.
41. Q. to K. B's 5th.41. Q. to K. R's sq.
42. K. to Kt's 2d.42. R. to K. Kt's 2d.
43. B. to K's 5th.43. Kt. takes P.
44. B. takes R.44. Kt. to K's 6th. (ch.)
45. K. to B's 3d.45. Q. to R's 8th. (ch.)
46. K. to B's 4th.
And Black wins.


Game XI.—Between the same players. (March 12, 1859.)
At the odds of the Pawn and Move.

(Remove Black's King's Bishop's Pawn from the Board.)

[209]

Go to PGN_81

 WHITE.  (Dr. J.)  BLACK.  (Mr. M.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 3d.
 2. P. to Q's 4th. 2. P. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. P. to Q's 5th. 3. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 4. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th. 4. Q. to Q. R's 4th. (ch.)
 5. Q. B. to Q's 2d. 5. Q. to Q. B's 2d.
 6. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 6. K. B. to K's 2d.
 7. P. to K. B's 4th. 7. Castles.
 8. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 8. P. to Q. R's 3d.
 9. P. to Q. R's 4th. 9. P. to Q. B's 5th.
10. Q. B. to K's 3d.10. K. Kt. to Kt's 5th.
11. Q. to Q's 2d.11. Kt. takes B.
12. Q. takes Kt.12. K. B. to Q. B's 4th.
13. K. Kt. to Q's 4th.13. P. to K's 4th.
14. P. takes P.14. Q. takes P.
15. Castles on Q's side.15. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.
16. K. to Q. Kt's sq.16. P. to Q. Kt's 5th.
17. Q. Kt. to K's 2d.17. P. to Q's 3d.
18. Q. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d.18. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th.
19. Q. R. to Q's 2d.19. P. to Q. B's 6th.
20. P. takes P.20. P. takes P.
21. Q. takes P.21. Q. Kt. to Q's 2d.
22. K. to R's 2d.22. Q. R. to Q. Kt's sq.
23. K. Kt. to K's 2d.23. Q. to K's sq.
24. Q. R. to Q's sq.24. Kt. to Q. Kt's 3d.
And Black wins.


[210]

Game XII.—Between Messrs. Harrwitz and Morphy.

Go to PGN_82

 WHITE.  (Mr. H.)  BLACK.  (Mr. M.)
 1. P. to Q's 4th. 1. P. to K. B's 4th.
 2. P. to Q. B's 4th. 2. P. to K's 3d.
 3. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 3d. 3. K. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
 4. Q. B. to K. Kt's 5th. 4. K. B. to K's 2d.
 5. P. to K's 3d. 5. Castles.
 6. K. B. to Q's 3d. 6. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.
 7. K. Kt. to K's 2d. 7. Q. B. to Q. Kt's 2d.
 8. Castles. 8. K. Kt. to K. R's 4th.
 9. B. takes B. 9. Q. takes B.
10. K. Kt. to Kt's 3d.10. Kt. takes Kt.
11. K. R. P. takes Kt.11. P. to Q's 3d.
12. P. to K. B's 4th.12. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
13. P. to K. Kt's 4th.13. Kt. to Q. Kt's 5th.
14. P. takes P.14. P. takes P.
15. Q. to K's 2d.15. Q. R. to K's sq.
16. Q. R. to K's sq.16. Q. to K. R's 5th.
17. B. to Q. Kt's sq.17. Q. R. to K's 3d.
18. Q. to K. B's 2d.18. Q. to K. R's 4th.
19. P. to Q's 5th.19. Q. R. to K. R's 3d.
20. Q. to K. B's 3d.20. Q. to K. R's 5th.
21. P. to Q. R's 3d.[A]21. Kt. to Q. R's 3d.
22. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.22. Kt. to Q. Kt's sq.
23. Kt. to K's 2d.23. Kt. to Q's 2d.
24. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d.24. P. to K. Kt's 3d.
25. K. to B's 2d.25. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
26. K. R. to K. R's sq.26. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th. (ch.)
27. K. to Kt's sq.27. Q. to K. B's 3d.
28. R. takes R.28. Kt. takes R.
29. Q. to her sq.29. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th.
30. Q. to her 2d.30. Q. to K. R's 5th.
31. Kt. to K. B's sq.31. R. to K's sq.
32. P. to K. Kt's 3d.32. Q. to K. R's 6th.
33. P. to Q. Kt's 5th.33. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
34. Q. to K. Kt's 2d.34. Q. takes Q. (ch.)
35. K. takes Q.35. P. to Q. R's 3d.
36. P. to Q. R's 4th.36. P. takes P.
37. Q. R. P. takes P.37. R. to Q. R's sq.
38. Kt. to Q's 2d.38. K. to Q. R's 6th.
39. P. to K's 4th.39. P. takes P.
40. Kt. takes P.40. Kt. takes Kt.
41. B. takes Kt.41. R. to Q. B's 6th.
42. B. to K. B's 3d.42. K. to K. B's 2d.
43. R. to K's 4th.43. B. to Q. B's sq.
44. B. to K's 2d.44. B. to K. B's 4th.
45. R. to Q's 4th.45. P. to K. R's 4th.
46. K. to B's 2d.46. K. to B's 3d.
47. R. to Q's 2d.47. B. to Q. B's 7th.
48. K. to K's sq.48. B. to K's 5th.
49. K. to B's 2d.49. K. to B's 4th.
50. R. to Q. R's 2d.50. P. to K. R's 5th.
51. P. takes P.51. K. takes K. B. P.
52. R. to Q. R's 7th.52. R. to K. R's 6th.
53. R. takes Q. B. P.53. R. to K. R's 7th. (ch.)
54. K. to K's sq.54. K. to K's 6th.
And White resigns.

[A] Surely it would have been wiser to play Kt. to K's 2d.



[211]

Game XIII.—Between Mr. Morphy and Mr. Harrwitz.

Go to PGN_83

 WHITE.  (Mr. H.)  BLACK.  (Mr. M.)
 1. P. to Q's 4th. 1. P. to K's 3d.
 2. P. to Q. B's 4th. 2. P. to Q's 4th.
 3. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 3d. 3. K. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
 4. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.[A] 4. P. to Q. R's 3d.
 5. P. to K's 3d. 5. P. to Q. B's 4th.
 6. K. Kt. to K. B's 3d. 6. Q. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
 7. P. to Q. R's 3d. 7. Q. B. P. takes Q. P.
 8. K. P. takes P. 8. Q. P. takes P.
 9. K. B. takes P. 9. P. to Q. Kt's 4th.
10. K. B. to Q's 3d.10. Q. B. to Q. Kt's 2d.
11. Castles.11. K. B. to K's 2d.
12. Q. B. to K's 5th.12. Castles.
13. Q. to K's 2d.13. K. Kt. to Q's 4th.
14. Q. B. to K. Kt's 3d.14. K. to R's sq.
15. K. R. to K's sq.15. K. B. to K. B's 3d.
16. Q. to K's 4th.16. P. to Kt's 3d.
17. Q. Kt. takes Kt.17. Q. takes Kt.
18. Q. takes Q.18. P. takes Q.
19. Kt. to K's 5th.19. Q. R. to Q's sq.[B]
20. Kt. takes Kt.20. Q. B. takes Kt.
21. Q. R. to Q. B's sq.21. Q. R. to Q. B's sq.
22. Q. B. to Q's 6th.22. K. R. to K. Kt's sq.
23. Q. B. to K's 5th.23. K. to K. Kt's 2d.[C]
24. P. to K. B's 4th.24. Q. B. to Q's 2d.
25. K. to K. B's 2d.25. P. to K. R's 3d.
26. K. to K's 3d.[D]26. Q. R. takes R.
27. R. takes R.27. R. to Q. B's sq.
28. R. to Q. B's 5th.28. K. B. takes B.
29. K. B. P. takes B.29. B. to K's 3d.
30. P. to Q. R's 4th.[E]30. P. takes P.
31. B. takes Q. R. P.31. R. to Q. Kt's sq.
32. R. to Q. Kt's 5th.32. R. to Q's sq.[F]
33. R. to Q. Kt's 6th.33. R. to Q. R's sq.
34. K. to Q's 2d.34. B. to Q. B's sq.
35. B. takes B.35. R. takes B.
36. R. to Q. Kt's 5th.36. R. to Q. R's sq.
37. R. takes Q. P.37. P. to Q. R's 6th.
38. P. takes P.38. R. takes P.
39. R. to Q. B's 5th.39. K. to K's B's sq.
40. K. to K's 2d.40. K. to K's 2d.
41. P. to Q's 5th.41. K. to Q's 2d.
42. R. to Q. B's 6th.42. P. to K. R's 4th.
43. R. to K. B's 6th.43. K. to K's 2d.
44. P. to Q's 6th. (ch.)44. K. to K's sq.
45. P. to K's 6th.45. P. takes P.
46. R. takes P. (ch.)46. K. to K. B's 2d.
47. P. to Q's 7th.47. R. to Q. R's sq.
48. R. to Q's 6th.48. K. to K's 2d.
49. R. takes P.49. K. takes P.
50. R. to K. Kt's 5th.50. R. to K. R's sq.
51. K. to K. B's 3d.51. K. to K's 3d.
52. K. to K. Kt's 3d.52. P. to K. R's 5th. (ch.)
53. K. to K. Kt's 4th.53. P. to K. R's 6th.
54. P. to K. Kt's 3d.54. K. to K. B's 3d.
55. R. to K. R's 5th.
And Black abandoned the game.

[A] A favorite move of Mr. Harrwitz, though decried by the chief authorities.

[B] Had he taken the Queen's Pawn, White would have won at least the exchange by moving Kt. to Q's 7th.

[C] Fearing to take the Bishop lest White should obtain an entrance with the Rook.

[D] All this is exceedingly well played by White.

[E] The coup juste. From this point it would not be easy to improve on White's moves.

[F] Better, perhaps, to have played the Rook to Q. R's sq. at once.



[212]

Game XIV.—(Unclassified.) Between Mr. Morphy and Mr. Anderssen.

Go to PGN_84

 WHITE.  (Mr. A.)  BLACK.  (Mr. M.)
 1. P. to Q. R's 3d. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. P. to Q. B's 4th. 2. K. Kt. to B's 3d.
 3. Q. Kt. to B's 3d. 3. P. to Q's 4th.
 4. P. takes P. 4. Kt. takes P.
 5. P. to K's 3d. 5. B. to K's 3d.
 6. K. Kt. to B's 3d. 6. B. to Q's 3d.
 7. B. to K's 2d. 7. Castles.
 8. P. to Q's 4th. 8. Kt. takes Kt.
 9. P. takes Kt. 9. P. to K's 5th.
10. Kt. to Q's 2d.10. P. to K. B's 4th.
11. P. to K. B's 4th.11. P. to K. Kt's 4th.
12. B. to Q. B's 4th.12. B. takes B.
13. Kt. takes B.13. P. takes P.
14. P. takes P.14. Q. to K's sq.
15. Castles.15. Q. to Q. B's 3d.
16. Q. to Q. Kt's 3d.16. Q. to her 4th.
17. R. to Q. Kt's sq.17. P. to Q. Kt's 3d.
18. Q. to Q. R's 2d.18. P. to Q. B's 3d.
19. Q. to K's 2d.19. Kt. to Q's 2d.
20. Kt. to K's 3d.20. Q. to K's 3d.
21. P. to Q. B's 4th.21. Kt. to K. B's 3d.
22. R. to Q. Kt's 3d.22. K. to B's 2d.
23. B. to Q. Kt's 2d.23. Q. R. to Q. B's sq.
24. K. to R's sq.24. R. to K. Kt's sq.
25. P. to Q's 5th.25. P. takes P.
26. P. takes P.26. Q. to her 2d.
27. Kt. to Q. B's 4th.27. K. to his 2d.
28. B. takes Kt. (ch.)28. K. takes B.
29. Q. to Q. Kt's 2d. (ch.)29. K. to B's 2d.
30. R. to K. R's 3d.30. R. to K. Kt's 2d.
31. Q. to her 4th.31. K. to Kt's sq.
32. R. to K. R's 6th.32. B. to B's sq.
33. P. to Q's 6th.33. R. to K. B's 2d.
34. R. to K. R's 3d.34. Q. to Q. R's 5th.
35. R. to Q. B's sq.35. R. to Q. B's 4th.
36. Q. R. to K. Kt's 3d. (ch.)36. B. to K. Kt's 2d.
37. P. to K. R's 3d.37. K. to R's sq.
38. R. takes B.38. R. takes R.
39. R. to Q. B's 3d.39. P. to K's 6th.
40. R. takes P.40. R. takes Kt.
41. Q. to K. B's 6th.41. R. to Q. B's 8th. (ch.)
42. K. to R's 2d.42. Q. takes P. (ch.)
And White loses.


[213]

Game XV.—STEINITZ GAMBIT.

Between W. Steinitz and J. W. Zukertort.

Go to PGN_85

 WHITE.  (Mr. S.)  BLACK.  (Mr. Z.)
 1. P. to K's 4th. 1. P. to K's 4th.
 2. Kt. to Q. B's 3d. 2. Kt. to Q. B's 3d.
 3. P. to B's 4th. 3. P. takes P.
 4. P. to Q's 4th. 4. Q. to R's 5th. (ch.)
 5. K. to K's 2d. 5. P. to Q's 4th.[A]
 6. P. takes P. 6. B. to Kt's 5th. (ch.)
 7. Kt. to B's 3d. 7. Castles.
 8. P. takes Kt. 8. B. to Q. B's 4th.
 9. P. takes P. (ch.) 9. K. to Kt's sq.
10. Kt. to Kt's 5th.[B]10. Kt. to B's 3d.
11. K. to Q's 3d.[C]11. Q. to R's 4th.
12. K. to B's 3d.12. B. takes P. (ch.)[D]
13. Q. Kt. takes B.13. Q. to B's 4th. (ch.)
14. K. to Kt's 3d.14. Q. to Kt's 3d. (ch.)
15. B. to Kt's 5th.15. B. takes Kt.
16. Q. takes B.16. R. takes Kt.
17. Q. to B's 6th.17. Q. to R's 4th.
18. P. to B's 3d.18. R. to Q's 3d.
19. Q. to B's 4th.19. P. to Kt's 4th.
20. K to B's 2d.20. Resigns.[E]

[214]

[A] The ingenious attack instituted hereby was invented by Zukertort.

[B] 10. P. takes B., Kt. to B's 3d!; 11. Q. takes R. (ch.), obtains three pieces for the Q., but loses the game. Q. to K's sq., here or on the following move, offers the only defence.

[C] Zukertort's analysis, which filled pages and pages of the Neue Berliner Schachzeitung, considered every conceivable move of White's down to P. to Q. R's 3d, but this one, upon which, in conjunction with the following K. move, Steinitz rested his gambit. 11. P. to B's 3d has been refuted in an elaborate analysis by Mr. Walter Penn Shipley, of Philadelphia.

[D] Black wins here by,

12. ...12. P. to Q. R's 3d.
13. K. to Kt's 3d.13. P. takes Kt.
14. P. to B's 3d.14. R. takes P.!
15. P. takes R.15. Q. to Q's 4th. (ch.)
16. K. to B's 2d.16. B. to B's 4th. (ch.)
17. K. to Q's 2d.17. B. to Kt's 5th. (ch.)
18. K. to K's 2d.18. Kt. to Kt's 5th.!

as played by Messrs. Honegger and Raubitscheck in a consultation game against Steinitz at the Metropolitan Chess Club, 1897. If, instead of K. to Kt's 3d, 13. Kt. takes P. Black wins by R. takes P.!.

[E] White has brought his K. into safety and will remain a piece ahead. Had Black, instead of his last move, pinned the B., the game would have proceeded as follows:

19. ...19. R. to Kt's 3d.
20. P. to Q. R's 4th.20. P. to Q. R's 3d.
21. B. takes P.21. R. takes P.
22. K. to B's 2d.22. P. takes B.
23. P. takes P.23. Q. takes P.
24. B. takes P. (ch.) and wins.

[TABLE OF CONTENTS]

[215]

CHAPTER VII.

ENDINGS OF GAMES

To play with correctness and skill the ends of games, is an important but a very rare accomplishment, except among the very best players. In order to assist the learner as much as possible in this branch of the game, we present a number of end positions, with the proper play necessary in each case. Our selection of positions is necessarily very limited; but those we give will serve to show the careful play that is requisite even when the stronger party feels sure of success, and the danger of defeat if he suffer his vigilance to be relaxed for a moment.

KING AND QUEEN AGAINST KING.

Diagram 1.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. Q. to Q. R's 7th.1. K. to Q's sq.
2. Q. to Q. Kt's 8th. Mate.


KING AND ROOK AGAINST KING.

Diagram 2.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. R. to K. R's 7th. 1. K. to K. B's sq.
 2. K. to K's 2d. 2. K. to K. Kt's sq.
 3. R. to Q. R's 7th. 3. K. to K. B's sq.
 4. K. to K's 3d. 4. K. to K's sq.
 5. K. to K's 4th. 5. K. to Q's sq.
 6. K. to Q's 5th. 6. K. to Q. B's sq.
 7. K. to Q's 6th. 7. K. to Q. Kt's sq.
 8. R. to Q. B's 7th. 8. K. to Q. R's sq.
 9. K. to Q. B's 6th. 9. K. to Q. Kt's sq.
10. K. to Q. Kt's 6th.10. K. to Q. R's sq.
11. R. to Q. B's 8th. Mate.


[216]

Diagram 3.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. R. to Q. R's 5th,
or K. Kt's 5th.
If 1. K. to B's sq.
2. R. to Q. Kt's 5th.
If 1. K. to K's sq.
2. R. to K. B's 5th.2. K. to Q's sq.
3. R. mates at Kt's 8th or
K. B's 8th.


KING AND TWO BISHOPS AGAINST KING.

Diagram 4.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. K. B. to K. R's 3d. 1. K. to Q's sq.
 2. Q. B. to K. B's 4th. 2. K. to K's 2d.
 3. K. to his 2d. 3. K. to K. B's 3d.
 4. K. to K. B's 3d. 4. K. to K's 2d.
 5. K. B. to K. B's 5th. 5. K. to K. B's 3d.
 6. K. to his Kt's 4th. 6. K. to his 2d.
 7. K. to his Kt's 5th. 7. K. to Q's sq.
 8. K. to his B's 6th. 8. K. to K's sq.
 9. Q. B. to Q. B's 7th. 9. K. to B's sq.
10. K. B. to Q's 7th.10. K. to Kt's sq.
11. K. to his Kt's 6th.11. K. to B's sq.
12. Q. B. to Q's 6th. (ch.)12. K. to Kt's sq.
13. K. B. to K's 6th. (ch.)13. K. to R's sq.
14. Q. B. checkmates.


KING, BISHOP, AND KNIGHT, AGAINST KING.

Diagram 5.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. Kt. to K. B's 7th. (ch.) 1. K. to Kt's sq.
 2. B. to K's 4th. 2. K. to B's sq.
 3. B. to K. R's 7th. 3. K. to his sq.
 4. Kt. to K's 5th. 4. K. to his B's sq.
 5. Kt. to Q's 7th. (ch.) 5. K. to his sq.
 6. K. to his 6th. 6. K. to Q's sq.
 7. K. to Q's 6th. 7. K. to his sq. (best)
 8. B. to K. Kt's 6th. (ch.) 8. K. to Q's sq.
 9. Kt. to Q. B's 5th. 9. K. to Q. B's sq.
10. K. B. to his 7th.10. K. to Q's sq.
11. Kt. to Q. Kt's 7th. (ch.)11. K. to Q. B's sq.
12. K. to Q. B's 6th.12. K. to Q. Kt's sq.
13. K. to Q. Kt's 6th.13. K. to Q. B's sq.
14. B. to K's 6th. (ch.)14. K. to Q. Kt's sq.
15. Kt. to Q. B's 5th.15. K. to Q. R's sq.
16. B. to Q's 7th.16. K. to Q. Kt's sq.
17. Kt. to Q. R's 6th. (ch.)17. K. to Q. R's sq.
18. B. to Q. B's 6th. (checkmate.)


[217]

No. 1.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


No. 2.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[218]

No. 3.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


No. 4.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[219]

KING AND TWO KNIGHTS AGAINST KING.

The two Knights, with the assistance of the King, cannot force checkmate, except in some very rare cases.

KING AND PAWN,—KING, BISHOP, AND PAWN,—AND
KING, KNIGHT, AND PAWN,—AGAINST KING.

When one Pawn only is left on the board, supported by its King, and the adverse King is either in front of the Pawn, or within such distance as to be able to intercept it, it becomes a point of great nicety in some cases, to calculate whether or not you have the power of Queening the Pawn, and therefore of winning the game. This frequently depends upon your gaining the opposition, which you cannot always do.

In the next position (see Diagram 6) you have the opposition, and if Black have to play you will win. Thus:—

1. K. to his sq.
2. P. to K's 7th.2. K. to his 2d.
3. K. to B's 7th, and
4. P. Queens.

But if you move first, the game is drawn; for if you play P. to K's 7th (ch.), Black moves King to his square, and you must either abandon the Pawn or give stalemate. You will find, on trial, that any other mode of play on your part will produce the same result,—from which is deduced this important general rule: That if you can advance the Pawn to its 7th sq., not giving check, you will win; but that if the Pawn checks at this point, you will only draw.

In this position (see Diagram 7), you will win either with or without the move; for if Black have to play, he is forced to allow your King to be moved either to B's 7th or Q's 7th sq.; and if you move you gain the opposition, by playing K. to B's 6th or Q's 6th, and then P. to K's 6th. It is evident that this would equally hold good if your Pawn were any number of squares less advanced; so that you invariably win, if you can succeed in placing your King on the sixth square of the file occupied by your Pawn, and in front of it; provided, of course, that the single King cannot attack the Pawn, so as to compel you to retreat in order to support it. It is perhaps scarcely necessary to observe, that if the Pawn be upon either of the Rooks' files, these remarks will not apply—this contingency will be considered hereafter.

Diagram 8.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. K. to Q's 2d.1. K. to his 2d.
2. K. to his 3d.2. K. to his 3d.
3. K. to his 4th.3. K. to B's 3d.
4. K. to Q's 5th.4. K. to K's 2d.
5. K. to his 5th.5. K. to B's 2d.
6. K. to Q's 6th.

If he play K. to B's 3d, you advance P. to K's 4th, then to K's 5th, and on his afterwards moving K. to his sq., you gain the opposition, as shown before.

[220]
6. K. to his sq.,
or to B's sq.
7. K. to K's 6th.
And then advances Pawn, winning.

Next, suppose Black has the move, and he will draw:—

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. K. to K's 2d.
2. K. to Q's 2d.2. K. to his 3d.
3. K. to his 3d.3. K. to his 4th.
4. K. to Q's 3d.4. K. to Q's 4th.
5. P. to K's 3d, or
to K's 4th. (ch.)
5. K. to K's 4th.

And it is clear that, play as you may, you can only draw the game.

The only exception in all the foregoing cases is to be found, as has already been remarked, when the Pawn is upon either of the Rooks' files. In these instances, Black will invariably draw the game when his King can be placed on any part of the file in front of the Pawn, it being quite immaterial at what distance the adverse King and Pawn may be. Even, as in the next example, the player of the single King will draw the game, if he have not the move, against two Pawns in a somewhat similar position. For White being to move, he can only play K. to R's 8th, to which Black must reply by K. to B's sq.; and if White then advance B's Pawn, it will be taken: or if he play R's Pawn, Black returns K. to B's 2d, and his adversary is stalemated. (See Diagram 9.)

Two united Pawns, with their King, always win against King alone. Another advantage in having two Pawns thus situated is, that they can always maintain themselves until the arrival of the King to their support; for should one be taken, the other will advance to Queen. In the next position (see Diagram 10), White wins by advancing K. to Kt's 5th, then Queening Rook's Pawn, and upon that being taken, playing K. to R's 6th, or B's 6th, having the opposition.

QUEEN AGAINST A KNIGHT OR BISHOP.

(In all cases, each party is of course understood
to have a King in addition to the Pieces named.)

Diagram 11.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. Q. to her 4th. (ch.) 1. K. to his 3d.
 2. K. to his 4th. 2. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d.
 3. Q. to her Kt's 6th. (ch.) 3. K. to B's 2d.
 4. K. to B's 5th. 4. Kt. to K's 2d. (ch.)
 5. K. to Kt's 5th. 5. Kt. to Q's 4th.
 6. Q. to her 6th. 6. Kt. to K's 2d.
 7. Q. to K. B's 6th.[A](ch.) 7. K. to his sq.
 8. Q. to K's 6th. 8. K to Q's sq.
 9. K. to B's 6th. 9. Kt. to Q. B's sq.
10. Q. to Q. B's 6th.
And you must win the Kt.

The Queen also easily wins against a Bishop.

[A] Transcriber supplied the "6th.", as the move was incomplete in the original text.



[221]

No. 5.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


No. 6.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[222]

No. 7.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


No. 8.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[223]

No. 9.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


No. 10.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[224]

No. 11.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


No. 12.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[225]

QUEEN AGAINST ROOK.

Diagram 12.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. K. to Kt's 6th.
 2. K. to K's 6th. 2. R. to Q. B's 7th.
 3. K. to Q's 5th. 3. K. to Kt's 7th.
 4. K. to Q's 4th. 4. K. to R's 8th.
 5. K. to Q's 3d. 5. R. to Kt's 7th.
 6. Q. to K. R's 4th. (ch.) 6. K. to Kt's 8th.
 7. K. to B's 3d. 7. R. to K. R's 7th.
 8. Q. to Kt's 5th. (ch.) 8. K. to R's 8th.
 9. Q. to R's 6th. (ch.) 9. K. to Kt's 8th.
10. Q. to Kt's 6th. (ch.)10. K. to R's 7th.
11. Q. to R's 7th. (ch.)11. K. to Kt's 8th.
12. Q. to Kt's 8th. (ch.)
Then takes Rook, and wins.


QUEEN AGAINST ROOK AND PAWN.

With few exceptions, arising from peculiar situations, the Queen wins also against a Rook and Pawn. Diagram 13, illustrating a won game, is from Philidor.

Diagram 13.

White moves and wins.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. Q. to R's 7th. (ch.) 1. K. to K's 3d. (best.)
 2. Q. to Q. B's 7th. 2. R. to Q. B's 4th.
 3. Q. to Q's 8th.[A] 3. R. to K's 4th.
 4. Q. to K's 8th. (ch.) 4. K. to Q's 4th.
 5. Q. to Q. B's 8th. 5. R. to K's 5th. (ch.)
 6. K. to K. B's 5th. 6. R. to K's 4th. (ch.)
 7. K. to K. B's 6th. 7. R. to K's 5th.
 8. Q. to K. B's 5th. (ch.) 8. R. to K's 4th.
 9. Q. to Q's 3d. (ch.) 9. K. to Q. B's 4th.
10. Q. to Q's 2d.10. K. to Q. B's 3d.
11. Q. to Q's 4th.11. K. to Q's 2d.
12. Q. to Q. B's 4th.12. R. to Q. B's 4th.
13. Q. to K. B's 7th. (ch.)13. K. to Q. B's 3d.
14. K. to his 7th.14. R. to K's 4th. (ch.)
15. K. to Q's 8th.15. R. to Q. B's 4th.
16. Q. to Q's 7th. (ch.)16. K. to Q's 4th.
17. K. to K's 7th.17. R. to Q. B's 3d.
18. Q. to K. B's 5th. (ch.)18. K. to Q. B's 5th.
19. K. to Q's 7th.19. R. to Q. B's 4th.
20. Q. to K's 4th. (ch.)20. K. to Kt's 6th.
21. K. takes P.
And wins.

[226]

[A] This is the position which White must endeavor to gain, in order that he may force the King to his Queen's 4th, in front of the Pawn.



QUEEN AGAINST TWO BISHOPS.

The Queen usually wins against two of the minor Pieces, at least if they are on different parts of the board, or at a distance from their King. There are, however, many instances in which, by skilful play, the weaker force may draw the game.

The two Bishops will be able to draw when they can assume a position similar to that in Diagram 14, or in other words, such a position in front of their King, that the adverse King cannot approach.

Diagram 14.

White moves first.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. Q. to Q's 7th. (ch.) 1. K. to B. or Kt's sq. (best.)
 2. Q. to K's 6th. 2. K. to Kt's 2d.
 3. K. to K. B's 4th. 3. B. to K. R's 2d.
 4. Q. to Q's 7th. (ch.) 4. K. to Kt's 3d.
 5. Q. to K's 8th. (ch.) 5. K. to Kt's 2d.
 6. K. to Kt's 4th. 6. B. to Kt's 3d.
 7. Q. to K's 6th. 7. B. to R's 2d.
 8. Q. checks at Q's 7th. 8. K. to Kt's 3d.
 9. Q. to K's 8th. (ch.) 9. K. to Kt's 2d.
10. K. to R's 5th.10. Q. B. to K. B's 4th.
The game is drawn.


QUEEN AGAINST TWO KNIGHTS.

Two Knights can often draw the game against a Queen.

QUEEN AGAINST KNIGHT AND BISHOP.

A King with Bishop and Knight can in many cases draw the game against a King and Queen.

[227]

No. 13.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


No. 14.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[228]

No. 15.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


No. 16.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[229]

No. 17.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


No. 18.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[230]

No. 19.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


No. 20.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[231]

QUEEN AGAINST QUEEN AND PAWN.

In cases of this kind the game is usually drawn without difficulty, and most generally so by means of a perpetual check, though the same object may sometimes be attained by an exchange of Queens, when your King is able to stop the Pawn. When, however, the Pawn is advanced to its 7th square, and more particularly if defended by its King, the task is one of more difficulty, and many instructive situations occur where the Pawn may be Queened and the game therefore won. We subjoin an example or two of each kind, by way of illustration.

Diagram 15.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. Q. to K. Kt's 4th. (ch.)1. Q. to K. Kt's 6th.
2. Q. to K's 4th. (ch.)2. K. to Kt's 8th.
3. Q. to Q's 4th.3. K. to R's 7th.
4. Q. to K. R's 8th. (ch.)4. Q. to R's 6th.
5. Q. to K's 5th. (ch.)5. K. to Kt's 8th.
6. Q. to Kt's 5th. (ch.)6. Q. to Kt's 7th.
7. Q. to K's 3d.
White will always be able to make a drawn game.


Diagram 16.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. Q. to her Kt's 4th.
2. K. moves.2. K. to Q's 8th.
3. Q. to Q. R's sq. (ch.)3. P. Queens.
And wins.


Diagram 17.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. Queens (ch.)1. K. to K. B's 5th.
2. Q. to K. B's 8th. (ch.)2. K. to his 5th.
3. Q. to K's 7th. (ch.)3. K. to K. B's 6th.
4. Q. to K. B's 6th. (ch.)4. K. to his 5th.
5. Q. to K's 6th. (ch.)5. K. to K. B's 6th.
6. Q. to K. B's 5th. (ch.)6. K. to his 7th.
7. Q. to her 3d. (ch.)
Then forces an exchange of Queens,
and wins with his remaining Pawn.


QUEEN AGAINST PAWN.

In all ordinary situations, the Queen of course easily stops a single Pawn and wins against it; if, however, the latter has reached its 7th square, and has the support of its King, there are instances in which the game must be drawn. Our first position (see Diagram 18), will show the method of winning, and we shall afterwards point out the exceptions.

Diagram 18.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. Q. to K. B's 5th. (ch.)1. K. to K. Kt's 7th.
2. Q. to K's 4th. (ch.)2. K. to B's 7th.
3. Q. to K. B's 4th. (ch.)3. K. to Kt's 7th.
4. Q. to K's 3d.4. K. to B's 8th.
5. Q. to K. B's 3d. (ch.)5. K. to his 8th.
6. K. to Q's 4th.6. K. to Q's 8th.
7. Q. to her 3d. (ch.)7. K. to his 8th.
8. K. to his 3d.8. K. to B's 8th.
9. Q. takes P. (ch.) and wins.

[232]

The same mode of procedure can always be adopted, unless the single Pawn should be either on the Bishop's or Rook's file, in which case Black may usually make a drawn game, owing to the power which he then has of making a stalemate. His having this alternative, however, altogether depends upon the distance which the adverse King may chance to be from the scene of action. In the next position (Diagram 19) the game is drawn.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. Q. to K. Kt's 4th. (ch.)1. K. to R's 8th.
2. Q. to K. B's 3d. (ch.)2. K. to Kt's 8th.
3. Q. to K. Kt's 3d. (ch.)3. K. to R's 8th.

And it is evident, that if White take the Pawn, his adversary is stalemated.

The result is the same when the Pawn is on the Rook's file, as you will at once see by making the experiment.

The next position (see Diagram 20), is a very ingenious exception to this rule, and will well repay your attention.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. K. to Q. B's 5th. (ch.)1. K. to Q. B's 7th. (best)
2. Q. to K. Kt's 2d. (ch.)2. K. to Q. B's 6th.
3. Q. to K. B's sq.3. K. to Q. Kt's 7th.
4. Q. to K's 2d. (ch.)4. K. to Q. Kt's 6th.
5. Q. to her sq. (ch.)5. K. to Q. Kt's 7th.
6. Q. to her 2d. sq. (ch.)6. K. to Q. Kt's 8th.
7. K. to Q. Kt's 4th.7. P. Queens.
8. K. to Q. Kt's 3d.
And wins.


ROOK AGAINST BISHOP.

Diagram 21.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. B. to Q. Kt's 7th.1. R. to Q. Kt's 3d.
2. B. to Q's 5th.2. R. to Q. Kt's 7th.
3. B. to Q. B's 6th.3. R. to K. B's 7th. (ch.)
4. K. to Kt's sq.4. K. to his 7th.
5. B. to Q's 5th.5. K. to his 8th.
6. B. to Q. B's 6th.6. R. to K. B's 3d.
7. B. to Q. Kt's 7th.7. R. to K. Kt's 3d. (ch.)
8. K. to K. R's 2d.8. K. to K. B's 7th.
9. K. to K. R's 3d, &c.
And the game is drawn.


Diagram 22.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. R. to Q. B's 2d.1. B. to Q. Kt's 6th.
2. R. to B's 8th. (ch.)2. B. to K. Kt's sq.
3. K. to Q's 6th.3. P. to Q. Kt's 6th.
4. R. to Q. B's 7th.4. B. to Q's 4th. (best)
5. K. takes B.5. K. to Kt's sq.
6. K. to his 6th.6. K. moves.
7. R. mates.


[233]

No. 21.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


No. 22.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[234]

No. 23.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


No. 24.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[235]

ROOK AGAINST KNIGHT.

In ordinary positions, and where the Knight is near to, or cannot be prevented approaching, his King, the weaker party will be able to draw the game. The method of doing so, however, is not very easy, and there are many positions (of which we shall give an example) where the Rook can win.

In the following position (see Diagram 23) White will win either with the move or without it.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. Kt. to R's 2d. (ch.)
2. K. to K. B's 7th.2. Kt. to Kt's 4th. (ch.)
3. K. to K. Kt's 6th.
And wins.


ROOK AND PAWN AGAINST BISHOP.

Diagram 24.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. R. to Q. Kt's 7th.1. B. to Q. B's 5th.
2. R. to Q. B's 7th.2. B. to Q. Kt's 4th.
3. K. to B's 5th.3. B. to K's 7th. (best)
4. P. to B's 7th.4. K. to Kt's 2d. (best)
5. K. to his 6th.5. B. to K. R's 4th. (best)
6. R. to Kt's 7th.6. B. to K. Kt's 3d.
7. P. to B's 8th,
becoming a Q. (ch.)
7. K. takes Q.
8. K. to B's 6th.
And wins.


ROOK AGAINST THREE MINOR PIECES.

Diagram 25.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. R. to Q. R's 3d. (ch.)1. B. to K's 6th.
2. R. to Q. R's 2d.2. K. to Kt's 6th.
3. R. to K. R's 2d.3. B. to K. B's 5th.
4. R. to Q. R's 2d.4. B. to K. R's 6th.
5. R. to Q. R's 3d. (ch.)5. B. to K's 6th.
6. R. to Q. R's 2d.6. Kt. to K. B's 7th. (ch.)
7. K. to Kt's sq.7. B. to K. Kt's 7th.
8. R. to K's 2d.8. Kt. to K. R's 6th. (checkmate.)


[236]

ROOK AND PAWN AGAINST ROOK.

Diagram 26.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K's 5th.1. R. to Q. Kt's 3d.
2. R. to Q. R's 7th.2. R. to Q. B's 3d.
3. P. to K's 6th.3. R. to Q. B's 8th.
4. K. to K. B's 6th.4. R. to K. B's 8th. (ch.)
And will draw.


ROOK AGAINST ONE OR MORE PAWNS.

Diagram 27.

White must lose, even with the move.

Suppose:—
  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. R. to K's 8th.1. K. to Q's 2d.
2. K. to his 3d.2. P. "Queens."
&c., &c.


Diagram 28.

Here White will win the Pawn, and therefore the game.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. R. to K. Kt's 6th. (ch.)1. K. to Q's 4th.
2. K. to Q's 2d.2. P. to Q. B's 4th.
3. R. to Q's 6th. (ch.)3. K. to Q. B's 5th.
4. K. to Q. B's 6th.4. K. to Q. Kt's 5th.
5. K. to Q's 5th.5. P. to Q. B's 5th.
6. R. to Q. Kt's 6th. (ch.)6. K. to Q. B's 6th.
7. R. to Q. B's 6th.
And White wins.


Diagram 29.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to K. B's 6th. (ch.)
2. R. takes P.2. R. P. "Queens" (ch.)
3. K. takes Q.3. K. takes R.
4. K. to K. Kt's sq.4. P. to K. Kt's 7th.
5. K. to K. R's 2d.5. K. to B's 7th, and wins.
Or,
1. P. to K. B's 6th. (ch.)
2. K. to R's sq.2. P. to K. Kt's 7th. (ch.)
3. K. takes R. P.3. P. takes R., and becomes
a Kt. (ch.), and wins.


ROOK AGAINST TWO ROOKS.

Diagram 30.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. R. to K. R's 5th.1. R. takes R.
2. R. to Q. R's 6th. (ch.)2. K. moves.
3. R. to Q. R's 5th. (ch.)3. K. moves.
4. R. takes R.
And wins.


[237]

No. 25.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


No. 26.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[238]

No. 27.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


No. 28.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[239]

No. 29.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


No. 30.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[240]

No. 31.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


No. 32.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[241]

ROOK AND BISHOP AGAINST ROOK.

Diagram 31.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. R. to K's 8th. (ch.) 1. R. to K. B's sq.
 2. R. to K's 7th. 2. R. to K. B's 8th.
 3. R. to Q's 7th. 3. R. to K. B's 7th.
 4. R. to Q. B's 7th. 4. R. to K. B's 8th.
 5. B. to K. B's 6th. 5. R. to K. Kt's 8th. (ch.)
 6. K. to B's 5th. 6. R. to K. Kt's 7th.
 7. B. to K's 5th. 7. R. to Q. R's 7th.
 8. R. to K. Kt's 7th. (ch.) 8. K. to B's sq.
 9. R. to Q's 7th. 9. K. to Kt's sq.
10. K. to B's 6th.10. R. to Q. R's 3d. (ch.)
11. B. to Q's 6th.11. R. to Q. R's 8th.
12. R. to K. Kt's 7th. (ch.)12. K. to R's sq.
13. R. to K. Kt's 2d.13. R. to K. B's 8th. (ch.)
14. K. to K. Kt's 6th.14. K. to Kt's sq.
15. B. to Q. B's 5th.15. R. to K. B's 5th.
16. R. to K. Kt's 5th.16. R. to Q. R's 5th.
17. K. to B's 6th. (dis. ch.)17. K. to R's 2d.
18. B. to K's 3d.18. R. to Q. B's 5th.
19. R. to K. Kt's 7th. (ch.)19. K. to R's sq.
20. R. to Q. Kt's 7th.20. K. to Kt's sq.
21. R. to Q. Kt's 8th. (ch.)21. K. to R's 2d.
22. R. to Q. Kt's 6th.22. R. to Q. B's 2d.
23. B. to Q's 4th.23. R. to K. B's 2d. (ch.)

This is his only move to draw the game; and now, whether you
take the Rook or not, he will succeed in preventing your winning.

ROOK AGAINST ROOK AND KNIGHT.

Diagram 32.

White, with the move, will win the Rook in four moves.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. Kt. to K's 6th. (ch.)1. K. to Q's 4th.
(If instead he play K. to his 5th,
White will check with R. at Kt's 4th.)
2. R. to Q's 8th. (ch.)2. K. to his 5th.
3. R. to Q's 4th. (ch.)3. K. moves.
4. K. takes R.


[242]

KING AND PAWN AGAINST KING AND PAWN.

Diagram 33.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. R. takes P. (ch.)
2. R. takes R.2. P. to Q's 7th.
3. R. to Q's 5th.3. K. takes R.
4. P. to Q's 7th.4. P. Queens.
5. P. Queens. (ch.)
And wins.


KING AND TWO PAWNS AGAINST KING AND PAWN.

Diagram 34.

First, suppose White moves:—

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. K. to Q's 4th.1. K. to Q's 3d.
2. K. to Q's 3d.2. K. to Q's 2d.
3. K. to K's 3d.3. K. to K's 2d.
4. K. to Q's 4th.4. K. to Q's 3d.
5. K. to K's 4th.5. K. to K's 3d.
And the game must be drawn.

But suppose Black have to play:—

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. K. to Q's 3d.
 2. P. to K. B's 5th. 2. K. to K's 2d.
 3. P. to K. B's 6th. (ch.) 3. K. to his 3d.
 4. K. to Q's 4th. 4. K. to Q's 3d.
 5. P. to K. B's 7th. 5. K. to his 2d.
 6. K. to his 5th. 6. K. takes P.
 7. K. to Q's 6th. 7. K. to B's sq.
 8. K. to his 6th. 8. K. to Kt's 2d.
 9. K. to his 7th. 9. K. to Kt's sq.
10. K. to B's 6th.10. K. to R's 2d.
11. K. to B's 7th.11. K. to R's sq.
12. K. takes P.12. K. to Kt's sq.
13. K. to B's 6th.13. K. to R's 2d.
14. K. to B's 7th.14. K. to R's sq.
15. K. to Kt's 6th.15. K. to Kt's sq.
16. K. to R's 6th.16. K. to R's sq.
17. P. to Kt's 6th.
And wins.


KING AND TWO PAWNS AGAINST KING AND TWO PAWNS.

Diagram 35.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. K. to his 3d.1. K. to his 4th.
2. K. to B's 3d.2. K. to B's 4th.
3. K. to Kt's 3d.3. K. to K's 4th.
4. K. to Kt's 4th.4. K. to B's 3d.
5. K. to Kt's 3d.5. K. to K's 4th.
And the game is drawn.

[243]
If Black move, he plays:—
1. K. to his 4th.
2. K. to his 3d.2. K. to Q's 4th.
(Were he to move K. to B's 4th,
you would win by 3. K. to Q's 4th.)
3. K. to B's 3d.3. K. to his 4th.
4. K. to Kt's 3d.4. K. to his 3d.
5. K. to Kt's 4th.5. K. to B's 3d.

And by continuing to play thus, Black may always draw the game.

KING AND TWO PAWNS AGAINST KING AND THREE PAWNS.

Diagram 36.

With or without the move Black wins.
First, with the move,—

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. P. to K. Kt's 6th.
 2. P. to R's 3d, or (A.) 2. K. to Q's 5th.
 3. K. to B's 3d. 3. K. to his 4th.
 4. K. to his 2d. 4. K. to his 5th.
 5. K. to B's sq. 5. K. to Q's 6th.
 6. K. to his sq. 6. K. to K's 6th.
 7. K. to B's sq. 7. K. to Q's 7th.
 8. K. to Kt's sq. 8. K. to his 7th.
 9. K. to R's sq. 9. P. to B's 6th.
10. P. takes P.10. K. to B's 7th.
Winning.

(A.)

2. P. takes P.2. R. P. takes P.
3. K. to B's sq.3. K. to his 6th.
4. K. to his sq.4. K. to Q's 6th.
5. K. to B's sq.5. K. to Q's 7th.
6. K. to Kt's sq.6. K. to his 7th.
7. K. to R's sq.7. P. to B's 6th.
And wins.

Next, if White move first he must equally lose.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. K. to B's 2d.1. P. to Kt's 6th. (ch.)
2. K. to Kt's sq.2. K. to his 6th.
3. K. to R's sq.3. P. to B's 6th.
4. P. takes B. P.4. K. to B's 7th, &c.
Winning.

[244]

No. 33.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


No. 34.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[245]

No. 35.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


No. 36.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[246]

No. 37.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


No. 38.

BLACK.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[247]

KING AGAINST THREE PASSED PAWNS.

Diagram 37.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. P. to B's 4th.
2. K. to Kt's 2d.2. P. to R's 4th.
3. K. to Kt's 3d.3. P. to Kt's 4th.
4. K. to Kt's 2d.4. P. to B's 5th.
5. K. to B's 3d.5. P. to R's 5th.
6. K. to Kt's 4th.

And wins; because whatever Pawn is moved, the King takes it.

KING AND THREE PASSED PAWNS AGAINST
KING AND THREE PASSED PAWNS.

Diagram 38.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
 1. K. to Q's 2d.
 2. P. to R's 4th. 2. K. to Q. B's 3d.
 3. P. to R's 5th. 3. K. to Kt's 4th.
 4. P. to Kt's 4th. 4. P. to R's 4th.
 5. P. to B's 4th. (ch.) 5. K. to R's 3d.
 6. P. to B's 5th. 6. K. to Kt's 4th.
 7. K. to B's 2d. 7. P. to R's 5th.
 8. K. to Kt's 2d. 8. P. to Kt's 4th.
 9. K. to R's 3d. 9. P. to B's 4th.
10. K. to R's 2d.10. P. to B's 5th.
11. K. to Kt's 2d.11. P. to Kt's 5th.
12. K. to Kt's sq.12. P. to B's 6th.
13. K. to B's 2d.13. P. to R's 6th.
14. K. to Kt's 3d.14. Is obliged to move
his King, and one of the
White Pawns will Queen.

[TABLE OF CONTENTS]

[248]

CHESS PROBLEMS.

Problem 1.

White to play and mate in two moves.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[249]

Problem 2.

White to play and mate in two moves.

Chessboard

WHITE.


Problem 3.

White to play and mate in three moves.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[250]

Problem 4.

White to play and mate in three moves.

Chessboard

WHITE.


Problem 5.

White to play and mate in four moves.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[251]

Problem 6.

White to play and mate in three moves.

Chessboard

WHITE.


Problem 7.

White to play and mate in three moves.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[252]

Problem 8.

White to play and checkmate without moving his King.

Chessboard

WHITE.


Problem 9.

White to play and mate in four moves.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[253]

Problem 10.

White to play and mate in three moves.

Chessboard

WHITE.


Problem 11.

White to play and mate in four moves.

Chessboard

WHITE.


[254]

Problem 12.

White to move his King alone and mate in five moves.

Chessboard

WHITE.


SOLUTIONS TO PROBLEMS.

No. 1.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. Q. to K. R's 4th.If 1. K. to K's 4th.
2. Q. to K. B's 6th. (checkmate.)
If 1. K. to Q. B's 4th
2. B. to Q. Kt's 6th. (checkmate.)
If 1. K. to K's 6th.
2. Q. to K. B's 2d. (checkmate.)


No. 2.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. B. to K. Kt's 8th.If 1. B. takes R.
2. R. to Q. R's 7th. (checkmate.)
If 1. Anything else.
2. R. to Q. R's 8th. (checkmate.)


[255]

No. 3.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. B. to K. B's 7th. (ch.)1. Kt. takes B.
2. Kt. to Q. B's 4th.2. Kt. moves.
3. Kt. to Q's 6th. (checkmate.)


No. 4.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. Kt. to K. Kt's 3d.1. K. B. takes P.
2. Kt. to K. B's 3d. (ch.)2. K. to K. B's 5th.
3. Q. to K. R's 4th. (checkmate.)


No. 5.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. Q. to K's 6th. (ch.)1. P. takes Q.
2. B. takes P. (ch.)2. K. takes R.
3. Kt. (at R's 7th.)
to K. Kt's 5th. (ch.)
3. Q. takes Kt.
4. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th. (checkmate.)


No. 6.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. Kt. to K. R's 4th.1. K. to Q's 4th.
2. Q. to Q's 6th. (ch.)2. K. to K's 5th.
3. Q. to Q's 4th. (checkmate.)


No. 7.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. Kt. to K. Kt's 6th.1. K. to Q's 5th.
2. Q. to Q. B's 3d. (ch.)2. K. takes P.
3. Q. to Q's 3d. (checkmate.)


No. 8.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. Q. to Q's sq. (ch.)1. K. to Kt's 7th.
2. Q. to K's sq.2. K. to B's 6th.
3. Q. to Q's 2d.3. K. to K's 5th.
4. Q. to Q. B's 3d.4. K. to B's 5th.
5. Q. to Q's 3d.5. K. to Kt's 5th.
6. Q. to K's 3d.6. K. to R's 5th.
7. Q. to K. B's 3d.7. K. to Kt's 4th.
8. Q. to K's 4th.8. K. to R's 4th.
9. Q. to K. B's 4th.9. K. to Kt's 3d.
10. Q. to K's 5th.10. K. to R's 3d.
11. Q. to K. B's 5th.11. K. to Kt's 2d.
12. Q. to K's 6th.12. K. to R's sq.
13. Q. to Q's 7th.13. K. to Kt's sq.
14. Q. to K's 7th.14. K. to R's sq.
15. Q. to K. B's 8th. (ch.)15. K. to R's 2d.
16. Q. to K. B's 6th.16. K. to Kt's sq.
17. Q. to K. R's 6th.17. K. to B's 2d.
18. Q. to Kt's 5th.18. K. to K's 3d.
19. Q. to B's 4th.19. K. to K's 2d.
20. Q. to B's 5th.20. K. to K's sq.
21. Q. to Q's 7th. (ch.)21. K. to B's sq.
22. Q. to K. R's 7th.22. K. to K's sq.
23. Q. to K. Kt's 7th.23. K. to Q's sq.
24. Q. to Q's 7th. (checkmate.)


[256]

No. 9.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. Q. to K's 5th. (ch.)1. K. takes Q.
2. P. to Q's 4th. (ch.)2. P. takes P. in passing
3. P. takes P. (dis. ch.)3. R. to K's 5th.
4. P. to Q's 4th. (checkmate.)


No. 10.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. Kt. to K's 5th. (dis. ch.)1. K. to B's 5th. (best.)
2. K. Kt's P. two.2. K. takes R.
3. B. to Kt's 5th. (checkmate.)


No. 11.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. R. to K. R's 4th.1. B. takes Kt.
(at Bl. Q's 6th.)
2. Kt. to K. Kt's 5th.2. P. to K's 3d.
3. R. takes P. (ch.)3. K. to K's 4th.
4. R. takes B. (disc. checkmate.)


No. 12.

  WHITE.  BLACK.
1. K. to K's sq.1. K. to K's 5th.
2. K. to K's 2d.2. K. to B's 4th.
3. K. to B's 3d.3. K. to K's 3d.
4. K. to B's 4th.4. K. to Q's 3d.
5. K. to B's 5th. (disc. ch.)


[TABLE OF CONTENTS]

THE END.

[257]

THE JOHN C. WINSTON COMPANY, Publishers
1006-1016 ARCH STREETPHILADELPHIA, PA.


TRANSCRIBER'S NOTE:

Here ends the original text of "The Blue Book of Chess". For the benefit of the reader, included below are the eighty-five "Illustrative Games" translated into Portable Game Notation.



{PGN 01}

[Event "Blindfold Exhibition"]
[Site "Paris, FRA"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Morphy"]
[Black "Boucher"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C62"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game I., p. 57."]
[PlyCount "53"]

1. {Mr. Morphy plays without seeing the Chess board or men, against M. Boucher, at Paris.} e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 exd4 4. Qxd4 Nc6 5. Bb5 Bd7 6. Bxc6 Bxc6 7. Bg5 f6 8. Bh4 Nh6 9. Nc3 Be7 10. O-O O-O 11. Qc4+ Kh8 12. Nd4 Qd7 13. Rad1 Rf7 14. f4 a5 15. f5 Rff8 16. Ne6 Rg8 17. a4 Ng4 18. Qe2 Ne5 19. Bg3 Qc8 {To enable him to capture the Bishop, which is about to take the Kt., with the Q's Pawn.} 20. Bxe5 dxe5 21. Rf3 {The attack looks already irresistible, but the actual finish is charmingly accomplished.} Bd7 {By this move Black may be said to lose a Piece. His best course--but that a bad one--was possibly to retreat his Bishop to K's square.} 22. Rh3 {Threatening mate in two moves.} h6 23. Qd2 Kh7 {To avert the promised mate, by Rxh6+, etc.} 24. Qxd7 Bd6 25. Rxh6+ {The termination is very pretty--quite an elegant little problem.} Kxh6 26. Rd3 {And Black has no possible means of escape; for, if he play Qe8, White simply captures the Queen for nothing; if Bc5+, then follows Kf1, etc.} Kh5 27. Qf7+ {And wins; the battle having lasted about seven hours.} 1-0



{PGN 02}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Morphy"]
[Black "Harrwitz"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C62"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game II., p. 58."]
[PlyCount "69"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 exd4 4. Qxd4 Nc6 5. Bb5 Bd7 6. Bxc6 Bxc6 7. Bg5 f6 8. Bh4 Nh6 9. Nc3 Be7 10. O-O Qd7 11. Rad1 O-O 12. Qc4+ Rf7 13. Nd4 Ng4 14. h3 Ne5 15. Qe2 g5 {Very imprudent in such a position and against such an opponent. It must be admitted, however, that Black has no good move at this crisis.} 16. Bg3 Rg7 17. Nf5 Rg6 18. f4 gxf4 19. Rxf4 Kh8 20. Rh4 Bf8 21. Bxe5 fxe5 22. Rf1 Qe6 23. Nb5 Qg8 24. Rf2 a6 25. Nxc7 {Perfectly sound, as the sequel shows.} Rc8 26. Nd5 Bxd5 27. exd5 Rc7 ({Taking the Pawn would have been injudicious; for example,} 27... Qxd5 28. Rxh7+ Kxh7 {best} 29. Qh5+ Bh6 30. Nxh6 Rxh6 31. Qf5+ Kg7 {Anything.} 32. Qxc8) 28. c4 Be7 29. Rh5 Qe8 30. c5 {The first step in a combination of admirable daring and ingenuity.} Rxc5 31. Rxh7+ Kxh7 32. Qh5+ Kg8 33. Nxe7+ Kg7 {Had he taken the Knight it would have cost him his Queen.} 34. Nf5+ Kg8 35. Nxd6 {And Black cannot possibly save the game.} 0-1



{PGN 03}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Morphy"]
[Black "Harrwitz"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C62"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game III., p. 59."]
[PlyCount "80"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 exd4 4. Qxd4 Nc6 5. Bb5 Bd7 6. Bxc6 Bxc6 7. Bg5 Nf6 8. Nc3 Be7 9. O-O-O O-O 10. Rhe1 h6 11. Bh4 Ne8 12. Bxe7 Qxe7 13. e5 Bxf3 14. gxf3 Qg5+ 15. Kb1 dxe5 16. Rxe5 Qg2 17. Nd5 Qxh2 18. Ree1 Qd6 19. Rg1 Kh7 20. Qe3 f5 21. Nf4 Qb6 22. Qe2 Rf7 23. Qc4 Qf6 24. Nh5 {This looks promising, but does not turn out well. He had better, perhaps, have played Rg6.} Qe7 25. Rde1 Qd7 26. a3 Nd6 27. Qd4 Rg8 28. Rg2 b6 29. Reg1 Ne8 30. Qc3 f4 {Well played. White must now beware, for his Kt. is in sore peril.} 31. Rh1 {This will not save the Kt. The best move was Rg4.} g6 32. Rhg1 Qd5 33. Qe1 gxh5 34. Rg5 {Merely desperate.} Qxf3 35. Qe5 Rf6 36. Qe7+ Rg7 37. Qxe8 hxg5 38. Qe1 Qc6 39. f3 Re6 40. Qf2 Rge7 0-1



{PGN 04}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Bird"]
[Black "Morphy"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C41"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game IV., p. 60."]
[PlyCount "58"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 f5 4. Nc3 fxe4 5. Nxe4 d5 6. Ng3 e4 7. Ne5 Nf6 8. Bg5 Bd6 9. Nh5 O-O 10. Qd2 Qe8 11. g4 Nxg4 12. Nxg4 Qxh5 13. Ne5 Nc6 14. Be2 Qh3 15. Nxc6 bxc6 16. Be3 Rb8 17. O-O-O Rxf2 18. Bxf2 Qa3 19. c3 Qxa2 20. b4 Qa1+ 21. Kc2 Qa4+ 22. Kb2 Bxb4 23. cxb4 Rxb4+ 24. Qxb4 Qxb4+ 25. Kc2 e3 26. Bxe3 Bf5+ 27. Rd3 Qc4+ 28. Kd2 Qa2+ 29. Kd1 Qb1+ 0-1



{PGN 05}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C41"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game V., p. 60."]
[PlyCount "56"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 f5 4. dxe5 fxe4 5. Ng5 d5 6. f4 {This is not the proper move; he should play e6.} Bc5 7. c4 c6 8. Nc3 Ne7 9. h4 h6 10. Nh3 O-O 11. Na4 Bb4+ 12. Bd2 Bxd2+ 13. Qxd2 d4 14. c5 b5 15. cxb6 axb6 16. b3 Be6 17. Be2 Nf5 18. Ng1 Ng3 19. Rh2 e3 20. Qb2 d3 21. Bf3 Rxf4 22. O-O-O Rfxa4 23. bxa4 Rxa4 24. a3 Rc4+ 25. Kb1 Rc2 26. Qb4 Na6 27. Qf4 Nc5 28. Qxg3 {And Black mates in two moves.} -- 0-1



{PGN 06}

[Event "Blindfold Exhibition"]
[Site "Paris, FRA"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Morphy"]
[Black "Potier"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C42"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game I., p. 65."]
[PlyCount "49"]

1. {Mr. Morphy plays without seeing the Chess-board or men, against M. Potier, at Paris.} e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bc4 Nxe4 4. Nc3 Nf6 {It is to be regretted that Mr. Potier did not take the Kt. rather than retreat, as many amateurs would have been pleased to see Mr. Morphy carrying out the attack of this interesting and comparatively novel debut.} 5. Nxe5 d5 6. Bb3 Be7 7. d4 c6 8. O-O Nbd7 9. f4 Nb6 10. Qf3 h5 11. f5 Qc7 12. Bf4 Bd6 13. Rae1 Kf8 14. Qg3 h4 15. Ng6+ {Finely played.} Kg8 16. Bxd6 hxg3 17. Bxc7 fxg6 18. fxg6 gxh2+ 19. Kh1 Bg4 20. Re7 Nbd7 21. Be5 Kf8 22. Rf7+ { The termination of this partie is remarkably elegant and finished.} Kg8 23. Nxd5 cxd5 24. Bxd5 Nb6 25. Bb3 1-0



{PGN 07}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1837.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Petroff"]
[Black "3 Russian Amateurs"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C43"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game II., p. 66."]
[PlyCount "53"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. d4 Nxe4 4. Bd3 d5 5. Nxe5 Bd6 6. O-O O-O 7. c4 f5 8. f4 c6 9. Be3 Be6 10. cxd5 cxd5 11. Nc3 Nc6 12. Rc1 Rf6 {This unfortunate counter attack is admirably taken advantage of by M. Petroff.} 13. Bxe4 fxe4 14. Nb5 Ne7 15. Nxd6 Qxd6 16. g4 g6 {They do not appear to have had a better move.} 17. f5 {Well played.} gxf5 18. Bg5 Rff8 19. Bh6 Rfc8 {It would have been better to leave the Rook en prise, and advance f4.} 20. Qd2 Qd8 21. Rxc8 Rxc8 22. gxf5 Nxf5 23. Qg2+ Kh8 24. Rxf5 Qg8 25. Rf6 Bh3 26. Qg3 Qxg3+ 27. hxg3 0-1



{PGN 08}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Tchigorin"]
[Black "Pillsbury, H. N."]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C49"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game III., p. 67."]
[PlyCount "52"]

1. {Notes by Jas. Mason.} e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nc3 Nc6 4. Bb5 Bb4 5. O-O O-O 6. d3 d6 7. Bg5 {In this familiar 'double Lopez' predicament, Bxc6 is highly recommended, if a dull but durable kind of game is desired.} Bxc3 8. bxc3 Ne7 {... Something like a leap in the dark. If the doubled Pawn can be 'dissolved' betimes, or the open file well used in attack, a safe landing may be confidently expected.} 9. Bxf6 gxf6 10. Qd2 Ng6 11. Kh1 {More or less necessary, sooner or later. Black does not attempt to dissolve, just here; for then Qh6, threatening Ng5, might be uncomfortable.} Kh8 12. d4 Rg8 13. Bd3 Qe7 14. Rab1 { Routine--indirectly including the questionable 16. d5?. At once Ng1, to be speedily followed by g3 and f4, would have given the matter another and perhaps very different complexion.} b6 15. Ng1 Be6 $1 16. d5 $2 Bd7 17. g3 Rg7 18. Rbe1 Rag8 {... The difference is in favor of the young American representative, who presses it fully.} 19. f3 {Manifestly weakening. The Russian champion feels himself on the defensive, and at a loss how to continue. Thus the text move may be as good as any other.} h5 $1 20. Re2 Nf8 21. f4 exf4 22. Qxf4 Nh7 23. Nf3 Bg4 24. Nd4 {Nh4 would be much stronger, the importance of halting the advancing Rook Pawn duly considered. Going from bad to worse, the downright blunder two moves later caps the climax--and more need not be said.} h4 $1 25. Re3 Qe5 26. gxh4 $2 Bf3+ 0-1



{PGN 09}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Cochrane"]
[Black "Staunton"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C40"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game I., p. 72."]
[PlyCount "39"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d5 3. Nxe5 Qe7 4. d4 f6 5. Nc3 fxe5 6. Nxd5 Qf7 7. Bc4 Be6 8. O-O c6 9. f4 cxd5 10. fxe5 Qd7 11. exd5 Bxd5 12. e6 Qc6 13. Qh5+ g6 14. Qxd5 Ne7 15. Qe5 Qxc4 16. Qxh8 Nf5 17. Bh6 Qb4 18. Qxf8+ Qxf8 19. Bxf8 Kxf8 20. g4 1-0



{PGN 10}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Jaenisch"]
[Black "Petroff"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C40"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game II., p. 73."]
[PlyCount "73"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d5 3. Nxe5 Qe7 4. d4 f6 5. Nf3 dxe4 6. Nfd2 f5 7. Be2 Nc6 8. Nb3 Nf6 9. O-O Qf7 10. c4 Bd7 11. Bf4 O-O-O 12. Nc3 h6 13. a3 g5 14. Bd2 f4 15. d5 Ne5 16. Nd4 Bc5 17. Be1 Rhg8 18. b4 Be7 19. f3 e3 20. Qb3 g4 21. c5 gxf3 22. Nxf3 Nxf3+ 23. Bxf3 Ng4 24. Qc4 Kb8 25. Qe4 Rde8 26. d6 Bc6 27. Qd4 Bxf3 28. Rxf3 Bg5 29. Nb5 c6 30. d7 Re6 31. Bg3 cxb5 {If Black had taken fxg3 at this point, the following moves show that he would have equally lost:--} (31... fxg3 32. Qxg4 gxh2+ 33. Kh1 Qxd7 34. Qg3+ {and wins.}) 32. Bxf4+ Ne5 33. Bxe5+ Rxe5 34. Qxe5+ Ka8 35. Rxf7 e2 36. Qe8+ Rxe8 37. dxe8=Q+ {and wins.} 1-0



{PGN 11}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Capdebo"]
[Black "Harrwitz, D."]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C54"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game I., p. 79."]
[PlyCount "42"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. cxd4 Bb4+ 7. Bd2 Bxd2+ 8. Nbxd2 d5 9. exd5 Nxd5 10. Qe2+ Be6 11. Bb5 O-O 12. Bxc6 bxc6 13. O-O Rb8 14. b3 Nf4 15. Qa6 Re8 16. Rfe1 Qd7 17. Ne5 Qxd4 18. Ndf3 Qb6 19. Qxb6 Rxb6 20. Rac1 f6 21. Nc4 Ra6 {And Black ultimately won.} 0-1



{PGN 12}

[Event "?"]
[Site "Philadelphia Athenaeum, PA, USA"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "McCabe"]
[Black "Montgomery, H. P."]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C53"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game II. p. 80"]
[PlyCount "46"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 f5 5. d3 Nf6 6. exf5 d5 7. Bb5 Qd6 8. O-O O-O 9. b4 Bb6 10. h3 Bxf5 11. Bxc6 bxc6 12. d4 e4 13. Ne5 a5 14. Ba3 axb4 15. Bxb4 c5 16. dxc5 Bxc5 17. Bxc5 Qxc5 18. Qd4 Qd6 19. Ng4 Bxg4 20. hxg4 Nxg4 21. g3 Qh6 22. Rd1 Qh2+ 23. Kf1 Rxf2+ {and wins.} 0-1



{PGN 13}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Staunton, Howard"]
[Black "Horwitz"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C53"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game III., p. 80"]
[PlyCount "143"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 d6 5. d4 exd4 6. cxd4 Bb6 7. Nc3 Bg4 8. Be3 Nf6 9. a3 O-O 10. Be2 Re8 11. d5 Ne5 12. Nxe5 Bxe2 13. Qxe2 Rxe5 14. Bxb6 axb6 15. O-O Nxe4 16. Nxe4 f5 17. f3 fxe4 18. fxe4 Qe7 19. Rae1 Re8 20. Rf4 h6 {Black would have gained no advantage by Rxd5 at this juncture, or by advancing g5 to attack the Rook. The move in the text was not made without due deliberation, and we believe it the best on the board.} 21. Qf3 {White designedly gives up the Queen's Pawn, to get a counter attack with his combined forces.} Rxd5 22. Rf1 {Qb3 would have been worse than useless.} Re5 23. Rf7 Qe6 ({Had he gone Qd8, to protect his threatened Pawn, White would have won the g7 Pawn. e.g.} 23... Qd8 24. Rxg7+ Kxg7 25. Qf7+ Kh8 26. Rf6 Rh5 27. Qxh5 Qxf6 28. Qxe8+) 24. Rxc7 Rxe4 25. Rxb7 d5 26. h3 {A most important move. Black dare not now advance d4 on account of Qf7+, which would enable White to double his Rooks on the adversary's g7, and thus win easily.} Re1 27. Rxe1 Qxe1+ 28. Qf1 ( 28. Kh2 {would have been very bad play, because} Qe5+ 29. Qg3 Qxg3+ 30. Kxg3 Re3+ 31. Kh2 Rb3) 28... Qe3+ 29. Qf2 Qc1+ 30. Kh2 Rf8 31. Qd4 Rf6 {He could not save all the Pawns attacked.} 32. Qxd5+ Kh7 33. Qe5 Rg6 {Threatening Rxg2, and then Qc6+.} 34. Re7 Qd2 35. Qe4 Qd6+ 36. Re5 Kg8 37. Qd5+ Qxd5 38. Rxd5 Kf7 39. Rb5 Ke7 40. g4 Kd7 41. Kg3 Kc6 42. Re5 Rd6 43. Re3 Kc5 44. h4 g6 45. Kf4 Kd4 46. Re4+ Kd5 47. Re8 Rf6+ 48. Ke3 Kc4 49. Re4+ Kd5 50. Rf4 Rc6 51. Rb4 Re6+ 52. Kd3 Rf6 53. Rb5+ {Ke3 would have been better.} Kc6 54. Re5 Kd6 55. Rb5 Kc6 56. Rb4 Rf3+ 57. Ke2 Rh3 58. Rf4 Rxh4 59. Rf6+ Kb5 60. Rxg6 Rh2+ 61. Kf3 Rxb2 62. Rxh6 Rb3+ 63. Kf4 Rxa3 64. g5 Ra1 65. Rh4 Kc5 66. g6 Ra7 67. Kf5 b5 68. Rg4 b4 {This was ill-judged. He should have played Rg7, or Ra8.} 69. g7 Rxg7 70. Rxg7 b3 71. Ke4 Kb4 72. Kd3 1-0



{PGN 14}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Horwitz"]
[Black "Staunton, Howard"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C54"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game IV., p. 83."]
[PlyCount "64"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d3 d6 6. Ng5 O-O 7. f4 d5 8. exd5 Nxd5 9. Bxd5 Qxd5 10. Qf3 Rd8 {From this point we look upon the game as virtually lost for White.} 11. Qxd5 Rxd5 12. Ke2 ({Probably his best move. Had he played} 12. b4 Nxb4 13. cxb4 Bd4 {winning the exchange.}) 12... Bg4+ 13. Nf3 Rad8 14. d4 {As good a move, perhaps, as he had on the board. By playing Rd1, he would evidently have lost a Piece.} exd4 15. c4 Re8+ 16. Kf2 {Well conceived. Tempting Black to open the discovered check, which would cost him 'the exchange.'} Rd7 17. Nbd2 d3+ 18. Kg3 Bxf3 19. Nxf3 Re2 20. Bd2 Rd6 21. Rad1 Rg6+ 22. Kh3 {Interposing Ng5, and then pushing f5 on the Rook afterwards, would have been unwise, on account of Bd6+, etc.} Rh6+ 23. Nh4 Be7 24. g3 Nd4 25. Bc3 Ne6 {Threatening, if White took at d3, to win a Piece.} 26. Kg4 Bxh4 27. gxh4 Re4 28. Rhf1 Rg6+ 29. Kf5 Re3 30. h5 Rg2 31. h4 Nc5 32. Rfe1 g6+ {And then Black mates in two moves.} 0-1



{PGN 15}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Staunton, Howard"]
[Black "St. Amant"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C53"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game V. p. 84."]
[PlyCount "59"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Qe7 5. d4 exd4 {The proper move is Bb6. Taking the Pawn gives an immediate advantage to White.} 6. O-O Ne5 7. Nxe5 Qxe5 8. f4 dxc3+ 9. Kh1 Qd4 10. Qb3 Nh6 11. Nxc3 O-O 12. h3 {If White play f5 at this point, his opponent may move Ng4, threatening to play afterwards Qg1+, and then mate with Nf2+.} c6 13. f5 Qf6 14. e5 { From this move the attack is very lively and interesting.} Qh4 15. Bxh6 Qxh6 16. Ne4 Bd4 17. Nd6 Qh5 18. Bxf7+ Rxf7 19. g4 Bxe5 {There appears to be nothing better, bad as this is.} 20. Rae1 Qxh3+ 21. Qxh3 Bxd6 22. Re8+ Bf8 23. Rfe1 d5 24. Rd8 Rd7 25. Ree8 Rxd8 26. Rxd8 b6 27. Qe3 Bb7 28. Rxa8 Bxa8 29. Qe6+ Kh8 30. Qf7 1-0



{PGN 16}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "2 Amateurs of Utica, NY"]
[Black "Cheney, of Syracuse, NY"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C54"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game VI., p. 85."]
[Mode "PM"]
[PlyCount "58"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 d5 7. Bb5 Ne4 8. Bxc6+ bxc6 9. cxd4 Bb6 10. O-O Bg4 11. Be3 O-O 12. h3 Bh5 13. g4 Bg6 14. Nh2 f5 15. f3 Ng3 16. Re1 f4 17. Bf2 Qe7 18. Nc3 h5 19. Qa4 Be8 20. b4 Qe6 21. Qb3 Bd7 22. Ne2 h4 23. Nf1 a5 24. Nfxg3 hxg3 25. Bxg3 fxg3 26. a3 Qh6 27. Kg2 Bxg4 28. fxg4 Bxd4 29. Rad1 -- {Black announced mate in four moves.} 0-1



{PGN 17}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Popert"]
[Black "A Fine Player of London"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C54"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game VII., p. 85"]
[PlyCount "57"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. O-O {O-O before c3, and before the adverse Nf6, appears safer play} Nxe4 6. d4 d5 7. Bb5 exd4 8. cxd4 Bd6 9. Ne5 Bxe5 10. dxe5 O-O 11. f4 f5 12. Nc3 Be6 13. Be3 a6 14. Bxc6 bxc6 15. Rc1 {Threatening Nxe4, and then Rxc6.} Qe8 16. Qc2 { Intending again Nxe4, and thus win a Pawn.} Rb8 17. Nxe4 fxe4 18. Qxc6 Rxb2 19. Qxe8 Rxe8 20. f5 {Well played, the advance of this Pawn secures to him an irresistible attack.} Bc8 21. Rxc7 Re2 22. Bd4 Rd2 { Note: This move was given as the impossible 'Rd3'.} 23. Bc3 Rd1 24. f6 gxf6 25. exf6 Be6 26. Rg7+ Kh8 27. Be5 Bg8 28. Re7 Bf7 29. -- {White now checkmates in two more moves.} 1-0



{PGN 18}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Buckle"]
[Black "Harrwitz"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C50"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game VIII., p. 86."]
[PlyCount "95"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. O-O Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. h3 O-O 7. d3 Be6 8. Bb3 Ne7 9. Ne2 Ng6 10. Ng3 c6 11. c3 d5 12. d4 dxe4 13. dxc5 exf3 14. Qxf3 Bxb3 15. axb3 Nd5 16. Nf5 {This is a very attacking position for the Kt., and generally occasions great embarrassment to an adversary.} b6 17. cxb6 Qxb6 18. c4 Ndf4 19. Bxf4 Nxf4 20. Rfd1 {Prudently taking possession of an 'open file.'} Qc7 21. Qxc6 Rfc8 22. Qxc7 Rxc7 23. Nd6 Ne2+ 24. Kf1 Nd4 25. b4 f5 26. c5 Rb8 27. Ra4 g6 28. Rda1 Nc2 29. Rxa7 Rxa7 30. Rxa7 Nxb4 31. Rb7 {White plays with remarkable care and judgment here.} Rxb7 32. Nxb7 Kf7 33. Ke2 Ke7 34. Kd2 Kd7 35. Na5 Na6 36. Nb3 Kc6 37. Kc3 Nxc5 38. Nxc5 Kxc5 39. h4 h6 40. f3 g5 41. h5 e4 42. fxe4 fxe4 43. g4 Kd5 44. b4 Ke5 45. b5 Kf4 46. b6 e3 47. b7 Kf3 48. b8=Q {And wins. The termination of this game is an improving lesson in Pawn play.} 1-0



{PGN 19}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Morphy"]
[Black "Anderssen"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C52"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game I., p. 91."]
[PlyCount "144"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Bxb4 5. c3 Ba5 6. d4 exd4 7. O-O Nf6 8. e5 d5 9. Bb5 Ne4 10. cxd4 O-O 11. Bxc6 bxc6 12. Qa4 Bb6 13. Qxc6 Bg4 14. Bb2 Bxf3 15. gxf3 Ng5 16. Nd2 Re8 17. Kh1 Nh3 18. f4 Qh4 19. Qxd5 Nxf2+ 20. Kg1 Nd3 21. Bc3 Nxf4 22. Qf3 Nh3+ 23. Kh1 Ng5 24. Qg2 Rad8 25. Rg1 h6 26. Raf1 Qh3 27. Qc6 Qd7 28. Qg2 Bxd4 29. Bxd4 Qxd4 30. Nf3 Qd5 31. h4 Ne6 32. Qg4 Qc6 33. Rg2 Rd3 34. Qf5 Red8 35. Qf6 Qd5 36. Qf5 Rd1 37. Rxd1 Qxd1+ 38. Kh2 Rd3 39. Rf2 Re3 40. Nd2 Re2 41. Qxf7+ Kh8 42. Ne4 Rxf2+ 43. Nxf2 Qd5 44. Ng4 Qxa2+ 45. Kg3 Qb3+ 46. Kh2 Qc2+ 47. Kg3 Qc3+ 48. Kh2 Qc6 49. h5 a5 50. Nf6 gxf6 51. Qxf6+ Kg8 52. Qg6+ Kf8 53. Qxh6+ Ke8 54. Qg6+ Kd7 55. h6 Qd5 56. h7 Qxe5+ 57. Kg1 Ng5 58. h8=Q Qxh8 59. Qxg5 Qd4+ 60. Kf1 a4 61. Qf5+ Kc6 62. Qc8 Kb5 63. Ke1 c5 64. Qb7+ Kc4 65. Qf7+ Kc3 66. Qf3+ Qd3 67. Qf6+ Kb3 68. Qb6+ Kc2 69. Qa7 Qc3+ 70. Ke2 a3 71. Qa4+ Kb2 72. Qb5+ Qb3 0-1



{PGN 20}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "Mead of NY, USA"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C52"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game II., p. 92."]
[PlyCount "74"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Bxb4 5. c3 Ba5 6. O-O Nge7 7. d4 exd4 8. Ng5 Ne5 9. Bb3 d5 10. exd5 h6 11. f4 Bg4 12. Qe1 hxg5 13. fxe5 Nxd5 14. Qg3 Be2 15. Ba4+ c6 16. Bxg5 Qb6 17. c4 d3+ 18. Rf2 Qb2 19. cxd5 Qxa1 20. a3 Bb6 21. dxc6 Bxf2+ 22. Kxf2 Qd4+ 23. Be3 Qxa4 24. cxb7 Rb8 25. Qxg7 Qh4+ 26. Kg1 Rxb7 27. Nd2 Qh7 28. Qf6 O-O 29. Qc6 Re7 30. Ne4 Qg6 31. Nf6+ Kh8 32. Qd6 Rg8 33. Nxg8 Qxd6 34. exd6 Rxe3 35. d7 d2 36. d8=Q d1=Q+ 37. Qxd1 Bxd1 0-1



{PGN 21}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Anderssen"]
[Black "Hillel"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C51"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game III., p. 93."]
[PlyCount "73"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Bxb4 5. c3 Ba5 6. d4 exd4 7. O-O Bb6 8. cxd4 d6 9. h3 Qf6 10. Bb2 Nh6 11. Nbd2 O-O 12. e5 dxe5 13. dxe5 Qe7 14. Ne4 Be6 15. Bd3 Bf5 16. Nf6+ gxf6 17. exf6 Qe8 18. Qd2 Be3 19. fxe3 Bxd3 20. Qxd3 Rd8 21. Qa3 Nf5 22. Rae1 Qe4 23. Ng5 Qh4 24. e4 Nfd4 25. Nf3 Nxf3+ 26. Qxf3 Rd2 27. Bc3 Rxa2 28. e5 Nd4 29. Bxd4 Qxd4+ 30. Kh1 Kh8 31. Re4 Qb2 32. Rh4 Qxe5 33. Qd3 h5 34. Qf5 Qxf5 35. Rxf5 Kh7 36. Rg5 Kh6 37. Rhxh5# 1-0



{PGN 22}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Marache"]
[Black "Morphy"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C52"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game IV., p. 94."]
[PlyCount "40"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Bxb4 5. c3 Ba5 6. d4 exd4 7. e5 d5 8. exd6 Qxd6 9. O-O Nge7 10. Ng5 O-O 11. Bd3 Bf5 12. Bxf5 Nxf5 13. Ba3 Qg6 14. Bxf8 Qxg5 15. Ba3 dxc3 16. Bc1 Qg6 17. Bf4 Rd8 18. Qc2 Ncd4 19. Qe4 Ng3 20. Qxg6 Nde2# 0-1



{PGN 23}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "der Laza, Von H."]
[Black "M"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C57"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game I., p. 96."]
[PlyCount "47"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 d5 5. exd5 Nxd5 6. Nxf7 Kxf7 7. Qf3+ Ke6 8. Nc3 Nce7 9. d4 b5 10. Nxb5 c6 11. Nc3 Qb6 12. dxe5 Bb7 13. Ne4 Qb4+ 14. Bd2 Qxc4 15. Qg4+ Kxe5 16. f4+ Kd4 17. c3+ Nxc3 18. Bxc3+ Kxe4 19. f5+ Kd5 20. O-O-O+ Kc5 21. b4+ Kb5 22. a4+ Kxa4 23. Qxc4 Nd5 24. Kb2 1-0



{PGN 24}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "M, Berlin Chess Club"]
[Black "H, Berlin Chess Club"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C57"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game II., p. 96."]
[PlyCount "49"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 d5 5. exd5 Nxd5 6. Nxf7 Kxf7 7. Qf3+ Ke6 8. Nc3 Nce7 9. d4 c6 10. dxe5 Ng6 11. O-O Bb4 12. Nxd5 cxd5 13. Rd1 Ne7 {Better dxc4, and give up the Queen.} 14. Bg5 Rf8 15. Bxe7 Kxe7 16. Qg3 Bc5 17. Rxd5 Bxf2+ 18. Kh1 Qb6 19. Qa3+ Ke8 20. Qa4+ Ke7 21. Rad1 Rf5 22. Rd7+ Kf8 23. Rd8+ Ke7 24. R1d7+ {He might have mated the King on the move Qe8#.} Bxd7 25. Qxd7# 1-0



{PGN 25}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Anderssen"]
[Black "Morphy"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "C77"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game I., p. 98."]
[PlyCount "88"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. d3 Bc5 6. c3 b5 7. Bc2 d5 8. exd5 Nxd5 9. h3 O-O 10. O-O h6 11. d4 exd4 12. cxd4 Bb6 13. Nc3 Ndb4 14. Bb1 Be6 15. a3 Nd5 16. Ne2 Nf6 17. Be3 Re8 18. Ng3 Bc4 19. Nf5 Bxf1 20. Qxf1 Ne7 21. N3h4 Nxf5 22. Nxf5 Qd7 23. Bxh6 gxh6 24. Qc1 Bxd4 25. Qxh6 Re1+ 26. Kh2 Ne4 27. Bxe4 Rxe4 28. Qg5+ Kf8 29. Qh6+ Ke8 30. Nxd4 Qd6+ 31. Qxd6 cxd6 32. Rd1 Kf8 33. Rd2 Rae8 34. g4 R8e5 35. f3 Re1 36. h4 Rd5 37. Kg3 a5 38. h5 Kg8 39. Kf2 Re8 40. Kg3 Kh7 41. Kf4 Re7 42. Kg3 f6 43. Kf4 Re8 44. Kg3 Re7 1/2-1/2



{PGN 26}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Lasker, E."]
[Black "Steinitz, Wm."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C62"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game II., p. 99."]
[PlyCount "91"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 d6 4. d4 Bd7 5. Nc3 Nge7 6. Be3 {White in this instance had probably made up his mind to adopt the plan frequently employed by Gunsberg in the Giuoco Piano, namely, playing Qd2 and O-O-O rapidly. --Gunsberg.} Ng6 {Black's difficulty is how to dispose of the Kt. Now g6 in this instance, although perhaps preferable, is not a good place either, subject as it must be to an early attack from the h pawn--Hoffer.} 7. Qd2 Be7 8. O-O-O a6 9. Be2 exd4 10. Nxd4 Nxd4 11. Qxd4 {If Bxd4, Nf4; and the Kt. cannot be captured on account of Bg5 winning the Queen.--Leeds Mercury.} Bf6 12. Qd2 Bc6 {There seems little use in this move. Either he can O-O now; if not, then it is proof positive that his defence is bad.--Gunsberg.} 13. Nd5 O-O 14. g4 {This premature advance is admirably taken advantage of by Steinitz. --Leeds Mercury.} Re8 {Although this looks like a defensive move, to make room for the Kt., it is a subtle design which was entirely overlooked by Lasker. --Hoffer.} 15. g5 $2 Bxd5 16. Qxd5 {But here is a great mistake, which ought to lose the game. exd5 would have averted the loss of a Pawn, but at the expense of position and attack; he was outplayed by Steinitz up to this point.} Re5 $1 17. Qd2 Bxg5 18. f4 Rxe4 19. fxg5 Qe7 20. Rdf1 {From this move to the end Lasker exhibits most marvellous power of resource. With Rdf1 he commenced one of the most ingenious attacks.} Rxe3 21. Bc4 Nh8 22. h4 c6 23. g6 $1 {One of the moves which will make this game memorable. The object is, if hxg6 to open up the Rook's file by h5. Allowance must of course be made for the fact that, being two Pawns behind, White has nothing to lose and everything to gain by desperate tactics.--Gunsberg.} d5 24. gxh7+ Kxh7 25. Bd3+ Kg8 26. h5 Re8 27. h6 g6 28. h7+ Kg7 29. Kb1 Qe5 30. a3 {Exhibiting consummate coolness in a 'do or die' predicament.--Pollock.} c5 31. Qf2 c4 $1 32. Qh4 f6 33. Bf5 $1 {Bf5 is evidence with what perfect lucidity Lasker detects the weak spots, and how immediately he takes advantage of his opponent's slightest omission or commission.--Hoffer.} Kf7 34. Rhg1 gxf5 35. Qh5+ Ke7 36. Rg8 Kd6 $2 37. Rxf5 Qe6 38. Rxe8 Qxe8 39. Rxf6+ Kc5 { Imprudent. The King should make for safety in the corner, via c7.--Mason.} 40. Qh6 {Threatening Rf8.--Gunsberg.} Re7 41. Qh2 $1 Qd7 {Qd7 is a final blunder. Rd7 should have been played, or Re6. The game is now over. It will be readily admitted that it is a well-earned victory which none will grudge the plucky young player.--Hoffer We really cannot see a satisfactory move, for if Re6, then follows Qf2+, and Rf8. Or if Qd8 then likewise Qf2+ should gain some advantage, as, on Kb5, White could continue with a4+ and Qc5, etc.--Gunsberg.} 42. Qg1+ d4 43. Qg5+ Qd5 44. Rf5 Qxf5 45. Qxf5+ Kd6 46. Qf6+ 1-0



{PGN 27}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1858.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Philadelphia"]
[Black "New York"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C54"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game I., p. 108."]
[Mode "TC"]
[PlyCount "77"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Bc4 Bc5 5. c3 Nf6 {The best move.} 6. e5 d5 7. Bb5 Ne4 8. cxd4 Bb6 9. Nbd2 {Preparatory to the move of Qc2.} O-O 10. Bxc6 bxc6 11. Qc2 {Threatening to win pawn at c6 or Nxe4, winning the d5 pawn.} Nxd2 12. Bxd2 Bg4 {If Black had played Ba6, to prevent White O-O, White would have won a piece by a4.} 13. Ng5 {A premature move.} g6 14. Qc3 f6 {The best move.} 15. h3 Bf5 {Better than fxg5, as White would then have opened the Rook's file.} 16. Nf3 Be4 {Better than fxe5.} 17. Bf4 {The best move.} fxe5 18. Bxe5 Qe7 { Intending to advance c6 Pawn. A strong move.} 19. O-O-O {An impudent move, in the face of such an attack.} c5 20. Rhe1 {A strong move.} cxd4 {c4 perhaps stronger.} 21. Bxd4 c5 22. Be5 Rae8 {Weak. We cannot see its object. Why not Rad8?} 23. Bg3 Qb7 {The best move.} 24. Ne5 {Preparatory to Ng4, and then Be5.} d4 25. Qc4+ Bd5 26. Qa4 {Preventing Black's contemplated move with the Q.} Re6 {With a view of withdrawing the B. and playing the Ra6.} 27. Ng4 h5 28. Rxe6 Bxe6 29. Qc2 Kh7 30. Re1 {The first move of a combination, which gave the victory to Philadelphia.} Bf5 {Insures the winning of the Kt.} 31. Qd2 {A powerful move, as it compels Black to take the Kt., and thereby opens White's R's file.} hxg4 32. hxg4 Qd5 {If Bxg4, White would have played Qg5, threatening to check K. and Q. with R., or win the R.} 33. Rh1+ ({An all important check before gxf5, as it prevented} 33. gxf5 Rxf5 34. Rh1+ Rh5) 33... Kg8 34. gxf5 Qxf5 35. Qh6 g5 36. Bd6 {A very attacking move. Much better than Be5.} Rf6 37. Qh5 {A better move than checking, as it prevented Black's K. escaping to f7, and then to e6. White also threatened g4.} Qg6 ({Black would have lost the Rook, if} 37... Rxd6 38. Qe8+ Kg7 39. Qe7+) 38. Qh8+ Kf7 39. Re1 {The coup de grace.} 1-0



{PGN 28}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1857.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Philadelphia"]
[Black "New York"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C44"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game II., p. 109."]
[Mode "PM"]
[PlyCount "63"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 Nxd4 4. Nxd4 exd4 5. Bc4 Qf6 6. O-O Bc5 7. e5 Qf5 8. c3 dxc3 9. Nxc3 Ne7 10. Bd3 Qe6 11. Ne4 Bd4 12. Ng5 Qb6 13. Qh5 g6 14. Qh6 Bxe5 15. Re1 Qf6 16. Nf3 d6 17. Bg5 Qe6 18. Nxe5 dxe5 19. Rac1 Rf8 20. Bc4 Qf5 21. Bxe7 Kxe7 22. f4 e4 23. Bd3 Be6 24. Bxe4 Qa5 25. Qh4+ Kd7 26. Red1+ Ke8 27. Kh1 c6 28. Rxc6 Rd8 29. Rcc1 Rxd1+ 30. Rxd1 h5 31. Qf6 Bc8 32. Bxb7 {And New York resigns, as they must lose their Q., or be mated in a few moves.} 1-0



{PGN 29}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Marache"]
[Black "Meek, A. B."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C44"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game III., p. 110."]
[PlyCount "37"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Bc4 Bc5 5. c3 d3 6. b4 Bb6 7. a4 a5 8. b5 Nce7 9. Qb3 d5 10. exd5 Qd6 11. Ba3 Qf6 12. Nbd2 Nh6 13. Ne4 d2+ 14. Nfxd2 Qe5 15. d6 cxd6 16. Bxd6 Qf5 17. Bxe7 Kxe7 18. Qa3+ Kd8 19. Qd6+ 1-0



{PGN 30}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Cochrane"]
[Black "Deschapelles"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C44"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game IV., p. 111"]
[PlyCount "61"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Bc4 Bc5 5. Ng5 Ne5 {This is not the correct move, he should have played Nh6.} 6. Bxf7+ Nxf7 7. Nxf7 Bb4+ 8. c3 dxc3 9. bxc3 Bxc3+ 10. Nxc3 Kxf7 11. Qd5+ Kf8 12. Ba3+ d6 13. e5 Qg5 14. exd6 Qxd5 15. dxc7+ Kf7 16. Nxd5 Bd7 17. O-O Rc8 18. Bd6 Ke6 19. Bg3 Bc6 20. Rad1 Bxd5 21. Rfe1+ Kf6 22. Rxd5 Nh6 23. Ra5 Nf5 24. Rc5 Nxg3 25. hxg3 Kf7 26. Rd1 Rhe8 27. Rd3 Re7 28. Rf5+ Ke8 {Ke6 would have saved the game.} 29. Rd8+ Rxd8 30. Rf8+ Kxf8 31. cxd8=Q+ $18 1-0



{PGN 31}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Staunton"]
[Black "Harrwitz"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game I., p. 113."]
[PlyCount "47"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. c3 f5 4. d4 fxe4 5. Nxe5 Nf6 6. Bb5 a6 7. Bxc6 bxc6 8. Bg5 Rb8 9. b4 Bb7 10. Qa4 d5 11. O-O ({The following moves will show the probable result of Nxc6:} 11. Nxc6 Qd7 12. b5 {His best move; if axb5, then Qa7.} Ra8 13. Qd1 axb5 {Or Bxc6. And White has little if any advantage.}) 11... h6 12. Bh4 Qd6 13. Bg3 Rg8 14. Nd2 Rc8 15. Nb3 Nd7 16. Na5 Nb6 17. Qc2 Ba8 18. f3 exf3 19. Rxf3 Qe6 20. Re1 Be7 21. Nexc6 Qxe1+ 22. Bxe1 Bxc6 23. Qg6+ Kd8 24. Nxc6+ 1-0



{PGN 32}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Evans, Captain"]
[Black "Horwitz"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C44"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game II., p. 114."]
[PlyCount "51"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. c3 f5 4. d4 exd4 5. e5 dxc3 6. Nxc3 Bb4 7. Bg5 Nge7 8. Bc4 d5 9. exd6 Qxd6 10. Qe2 Nd4 11. Nxd4 Qxd4 12. O-O Bd7 13. Nd5 O-O-O 14. Bxe7 Bxe7 15. Nxe7+ Kb8 16. Rfd1 Qh4 17. Bb3 Qh6 18. Rd2 f4 19. Rad1 f3 20. Qxf3 a6 21. Rxd7 Rxd7 22. Rxd7 Qc1+ 23. Qd1 Qxb2 24. Rd8+ Rxd8 25. Qxd8+ Ka7 26. Nc6+ {And White mates in four moves.} 1-0



{PGN 33}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Evans, Captain"]
[Black "Henderson"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C44"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game III., p. 114."]
[PlyCount "112"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. c3 d5 4. Bb5 Bg4 5. Qa4 Qd6 6. Nxe5 Qxe5 7. Bxc6+ bxc6 8. Qxc6+ Ke7 9. f3 Rd8 10. d4 Qe6 11. Qxc7+ Rd7 12. Qc5+ Ke8 13. Qc8+ Rd8 14. Qxe6+ Bxe6 15. e5 f5 16. Nd2 Nh6 17. Nb3 Nf7 18. f4 Be7 19. h4 Nh6 20. Ke2 Bd7 21. Kf3 Bb5 22. g3 Bd3 23. Nd2 Ng4 24. Re1 h6 25. b3 Rc8 26. Bb2 g5 27. h5 gxf4 28. gxf4 Rg8 29. Rh1 Kf7 30. Rh3 Ke6 31. Rc1 Rg7 32. c4 dxc4 33. Nxc4 Be4+ 34. Ke2 Bg2 35. Rg3 Be4 36. a3 Rcg8 37. Rcg1 Bh4 38. Rh3 Bf2 39. Rc1 Bg2 40. Rd3 Bh4 41. Nd6 Nf2 42. Rdc3 Ne4 43. d5+ Kxd5 44. Rd3+ Ke6 45. Nxe4 fxe4 46. Rd6+ Kf5 47. e6 Bf3+ 48. Ke3 Rg2 49. Rc5+ Kg4 50. Rd2 Rxd2 51. Kxd2 Kxf4 52. Be5+ Kg4 53. Ke3 Bg5+ 54. Kd4 e3 55. Rc1 Rd8+ 56. Kc3 Rc8+ {And Black wins.} 0-1



{PGN 34}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Staunton"]
[Black "Popert"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C23"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game I., p. 122."]
[PlyCount "77"]

1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Bc5 3. c3 d6 {Not so good a move as Nf6, or Qg5.} 4. Nf3 {d4 would perhaps have been stronger play.} Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. cxd4 Bb4+ 7. Bd2 Bxd2+ 8. Nbxd2 O-O {d5 is a better move at this point.} 9. Bd3 Nc6 10. a3 Bg4 11. Qc2 h6 12. Rc1 d5 13. e5 Bxf3 14. Nxf3 Nh5 15. g3 g6 16. b4 Qd7 {Intending, if b5, to move Qg4.} 17. Qd2 Kh7 18. O-O Rae8 19. Rc3 Nd8 20. Nh4 c6 21. f4 f5 22. g4 Ng7 23. gxf5 Nxf5 24. Nxf5 gxf5 25. Kh1 Rg8 26. Rcc1 Qf7 27. Qc2 Ref8 28. Rg1 Ne6 29. Rxg8 Kxg8 30. Rg1+ Kh8 31. Qf2 Qh5 {A lost move.} 32. Be2 Qf7 33. Qh4 Qh7 34. Bh5 Nxd4 35. Rg3 b6 36. Bg6 {It would have been more decisive if Bf7 at once.} Qg7 37. Bf7 Rxf7 {If Qxf7, mate follows in three moves.} 38. Rxg7 Kxg7 39. Kg2 {and wins.} 1-0



{PGN 35}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Amateur 1"]
[Black "Amateur 2"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C23"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game II., p. 123."]
[PlyCount "37"]

1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Bc5 3. c3 Qg5 4. Qf3 Qg6 5. Ne2 d6 6. d4 exd4 7. cxd4 Bb6 8. e5 Ne7 9. e6 f6 10. Nbc3 O-O 11. Nf4 Qe8 12. Be3 Nbc6 13. Rd1 Kh8 14. h4 Nd8 15. h5 f5 16. Ncd5 Bxe6 17. Nxe7 Qxe7 18. Ng6+ hxg6 19. hxg6+ {And White gives checkmate in three moves.} 1-0



{PGN 36}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "De la Bourdonnais"]
[Black "McDonnell"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C23"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game III., p. 124."]
[PlyCount "76"]

1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Bc5 3. Qe2 Nf6 4. d3 Nc6 5. c3 Ne7 6. f4 exf4 {In this opening it is not advisable for the second player to take the gambit P. with his e5} 7. d4 Bb6 8. Bxf4 d6 9. Bd3 Ng6 10. Be3 O-O 11. h3 Re8 12. Nd2 Qe7 13. O-O-O c5 14. Kb1 cxd4 15. cxd4 a5 16. Ngf3 Bd7 17. g4 h6 18. Rdg1 a4 19. g5 hxg5 20. Bxg5 a3 21. b3 Bc6 22. Rg4 Ba5 23. h4 Bxd2 24. Nxd2 Ra5 25. h5 Rxg5 26. Rxg5 Nf4 27. Qf3 Nxd3 28. d5 Nxd5 29. Rhg1 {This portion of the game is full of interest and instruction, and is remarkably well played.} Nc3+ 30. Ka1 Bxe4 31. Rxg7+ Kh8 32. Qg3 Bg6 33. hxg6 Qe1+ 34. Rxe1 {White loses the game by this move.} Rxe1+ 35. Qxe1 Nxe1 36. Rh7+ Kg8 37. gxf7+ Kxh7 38. f8=Q Nc2# 0-1



{PGN 37}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C23"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game IV., p. 125."]
[PlyCount "44"]

1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Bc5 3. Qe2 Nc6 4. Bxf7+ Kxf7 5. Qc4+ d5 6. Qxc5 dxe4 7. Qc4+ Be6 8. Qxe4 Nf6 9. Qh4 Nd4 10. Na3 e4 11. c3 g5 {The game from this point forward is admirably conducted by Black.} 12. Qxg5 Rg8 13. Qe3 Nf5 14. Qe2 Rxg2 15. Nc2 Qd6 16. Ne3 Nxe3 17. dxe3 Rag8 18. Qf1 Rd8 19. Qe2 Ng4 20. Nh3 Ne5 21. Nf4 Nf3+ 22. Kf1 {And Black can checkmate in six moves.} -- 0-1



{PGN 38}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Staunton"]
[Black "Cochrane"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C52"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game V., p. 125."]
[PlyCount "51"]

1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Bc5 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. b4 {We have now the same position brought about which occurs in the Evans Gambit.} Bxb4 5. c3 Ba5 6. O-O Bb6 7. d4 exd4 8. Nxd4 Nxd4 9. cxd4 d6 10. a4 c6 11. a5 Bc7 ({If he had taken:} 11... Bxa5 12. Bxf7+ Kxf7 13. Qh5+ {White would have gained a more valuable P. in return, and have deprived his opponent of the privilege of castling.}) 12. Qb3 Qe7 13. Ba3 Qf6 14. Nc3 Qg6 15. Ne2 Nh6 16. e5 d5 17. Bd3 Nf5 18. Qb4 Bd8 19. Qb1 Qh5 20. Ng3 Nxg3 21. fxg3 Bxa5 22. Bf5 Bb6 23. Qb4 Qg5 24. Bxc8 Rxc8 25. e6 fxe6 {And White announced mate in eight moves.} 26. -- 1-0



{PGN 39}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Walker"]
[Black "Daniels"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C23"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game VI., p. 126."]
[PlyCount "57"]

1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Bc5 3. c3 d5 4. Bxd5 Nf6 5. Qb3 O-O 6. Nf3 c6 {This is not advisable. It would be better to Nxd5.} 7. Bxf7+ {The notion of this sacrifice originated with Messrs. Henderson and Williams, of Bristol, during an examination of the present opening.} Rxf7 8. Nxe5 Qe7 9. Qxf7+ Qxf7 10. Nxf7 Kxf7 11. d4 Bb6 12. f3 Be6 13. Be3 Na6 14. Kf2 Nc7 15. Nd2 g6 16. g4 Kg7 17. h4 Re8 18. h5 Bf7 19. hxg6 Bxg6 20. Rag1 Ne6 21. Nc4 Bc7 22. e5 Nd5 23. Bh6+ Kf7 24. Kg3 b5 25. Ne3 Nxe3 26. Bxe3 c5 27. f4 cxd4 28. cxd4 Bd3 29. f5 1-0



{PGN 40}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Stanley"]
[Black "Rousseau"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C26"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game I., p. 131."]
[PlyCount "39"]

1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Nf6 3. Nc3 Bc5 4. Nf3 d6 5. h3 O-O 6. d3 Be6 7. Bb3 Nc6 8. Ne2 Qe7 9. Ng3 Nd4 10. Nxd4 Bxd4 11. c3 {White gains a move by this exchange of Pieces.} Bb6 12. O-O d5 {h6 would have been better play.} 13. Bg5 c6 14. Nh5 dxe4 15. dxe4 Bxb3 16. Qf3 {This is very finely played, and is an example to young players of the importance of gaining time at chess. Had White paused in his attack to recover the lost Bishop, the adversary might have succeeded in dislodging one or other of the Pieces by which he is beleaguered, or in bringing his own forces to the rescue, and then have ultimately retrieved the game.} Bc4 17. Bxf6 Qe6 18. Nxg7 Be2 19. Nxe6 Bxf3 20. Nxf8 1-0



{PGN 41}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Schulten"]
[Black "Horwitz"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C26"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game II., p. 132."]
[PlyCount "29"]

1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Nf6 3. Nc3 b5 4. Bxb5 Bc5 5. d3 c6 6. Bc4 Qb6 7. Qe2 d5 8. exd5 O-O 9. Ne4 Nxe4 10. dxe4 Bxf2+ {Black plays capitally now to the end.} 11. Qxf2 Qb4+ 12. Bd2 Qxc4 13. Qf3 f5 14. exf5 Bxf5 15. Qg3 $19 {And Black mated by force in three moves. It is rarely in actual play one sees so pretty a mate.} 0-1



{PGN 42}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Bledow, Dr."]
[Black "Von Bilguer"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C23"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game III., p. 132."]
[PlyCount "65"]

1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 f5 3. d3 Nf6 4. Nf3 fxe4 5. dxe4 Nxe4 6. Qd5 Nd6 7. Nxe5 c6 8. Qf7+ Nxf7 9. Bxf7+ Ke7 10. Bg5+ Kd6 11. Bxd8 Kxe5 12. f4+ Kf5 13. Bg5 Bb4+ 14. c3 Bc5 15. Bb3 h6 16. Bc2+ Kg4 17. Bd1+ Kf5 18. g4+ Kg6 19. Bc2+ Kf7 20. Bh4 Be7 21. Bg3 d5 22. f5 Nd7 23. Nd2 Bf6 24. Nf3 Re8+ 25. Kf2 Nc5 26. Rhe1 Bd7 27. b4 Ne4+ 28. Rxe4 {The terminating moves are admirably played by Dr. Bledow.} dxe4 29. Bb3+ Kf8 30. Bd6+ Be7 31. Ne5 g5 {It is quite evident that on taking the B., mate would have followed next move.} 32. f6 {Beautifully played.} e3+ 33. Kg1 1-0



{PGN 43}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Amateur"]
[Black "Amateur"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C23"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game IV., p. 133."]
[PlyCount "53"]

1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 c6 3. Qe2 Qc7 4. c3 Nf6 5. f4 d6 6. f5 d5 7. exd5 cxd5 8. Bb5+ Bd7 9. Bxd7+ Nbxd7 10. d4 e4 11. Nh3 O-O-O 12. O-O Bd6 13. Nf4 h6 14. Qf2 Ng4 15. Qe2 h5 16. Nxd5 Bxh2+ 17. Kh1 Qd6 18. Qxe4 Rhe8 19. Qf3 g6 20. Bg5 f6 21. Bd2 g5 22. Na3 a5 23. Nc4 Qc6 24. Nxa5 Qb5 25. c4 Qa4 26. Nb6+ Nxb6 27. Qxb7# 1-0



{PGN 44}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Evans, Captain"]
[Black "P."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C20"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game I., p. 135."]
[PlyCount "63"]

1. e4 e5 2. c3 Nf6 3. d4 exd4 4. e5 Ne4 5. Qe2 Ng5 6. cxd4 Bb4+ 7. Nc3 Nc6 8. Qd3 d5 9. f4 Ne4 10. Nf3 Bf5 11. Qe3 O-O 12. a3 Ba5 13. b4 Bb6 14. Bb2 Bg4 15. Na4 Bxf3 16. Nxb6 Bxg2 17. Bxg2 Qh4+ 18. Ke2 axb6 19. Bxe4 dxe4 20. Qxe4 Qg4+ 21. Qf3 Qf5 22. Rac1 Nxb4 23. Rhg1 {Black played ingeniously in offering to give up the Kt. If White had taken it, he must have been subjected to an embarrassing attack for some little time.} Nc6 24. Rg5 Qd7 25. d5 Ne7 26. Rxg7+ Kh8 27. Qd3 Ng6 28. Rxg6 Rae8 29. Kf2 {Had he played on the P. (dis. ch.), he could not take the Q. until his King was removed.} Re6 30. Rg3 Rd8 31. dxe6 Qe7 {Taking the Q. would have been fatal to him.} 32. exf7 1-0



{PGN 45}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Staunton"]
[Black "Cochrane"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C20"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game II., p. 135."]
[PlyCount "67"]

1. e4 e5 2. c3 d5 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nxe5 Nxe4 5. d4 Bd6 6. Nd2 O-O 7. Nxe4 dxe4 8. Bf4 Bxe5 9. Bxe5 Nc6 10. Bc4 Be6 11. Bb5 Ne7 12. O-O c6 13. Ba4 Ng6 14. Bg3 f5 15. f4 exf3 16. Rxf3 f4 17. Bb3 {But for this move of resource, Black would evidently have gained 'the exchange,' at least.} Qd6 18. Bf2 Kh8 19. Bxe6 Qxe6 20. Qd3 Rae8 21. Rh3 Qf5 22. Qf3 Re4 23. Rh5 Qe6 24. c4 Re8 25. b3 Qf6 26. Rf1 Re2 27. a4 Ra2 28. d5 Ra1 29. Bxa7 {An important outlet for his King.} Ree1 30. Rxe1 Rxe1+ 31. Kf2 Qa1 {Black has now a very menacing position.} 32. Qd3 Rg1 33. Qe2 Ne7 34. d6 $18 1-0



{PGN 46}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Evans, Captain"]
[Black "St. Amant"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C20"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game III., p. 136."]
[PlyCount "47"]

1. e4 e5 2. c3 c5 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. Bc4 Nf6 5. d4 cxd4 6. Ng5 {We have here a position almost identical with the leading one of the "Two Knights' Game."} d5 7. exd5 Nxd5 8. Nxf7 Kxf7 9. Qf3+ Ke6 10. O-O Na5 11. Bg5 Qd6 12. g4 Qd7 13. Bd3 Qf7 14. Bf5+ Kd6 15. cxd4 Bxf5 16. dxe5+ Kxe5 17. gxf5 Nc6 18. Re1+ Kd6 19. Re6+ Kc5 20. Be3+ Nxe3 21. Qxe3+ Kb5 22. Qd3+ Kb6 23. Qb3+ Kc7 24. Rxc6+ $18 1-0



{PGN 47}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Walker, G."]
[Black "St. Amant"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C20"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game IV., p. 137."]
[PlyCount "64"]

1. e4 e5 2. c3 d5 3. exd5 Qxd5 4. Nf3 Bc5 5. b3 Bg4 6. Be2 e4 7. Nd4 Bxe2 8. Nxe2 Nc6 9. O-O Ne5 10. Nf4 Qd6 11. d4 exd3 12. Re1 O-O-O 13. Nd2 f5 14. a4 a5 15. b4 axb4 16. cxb4 Bd4 17. Rb1 Nf6 18. Nb3 Nfg4 19. Nxd4 Qxd4 20. Be3 Qd6 21. Bc5 Qh6 22. Nh3 Rhe8 23. a5 d2 24. Rf1 Nd3 25. a6 bxa6 26. Qf3 Re4 27. Qxf5+ Qe6 28. Qxe6+ Rxe6 29. Ng5 Re1 30. Be3 Nxe3 31. fxe3 Rxf1+ 32. Kxf1 Nc1 $19 0-1



{PGN 48}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "der Laza, V. H."]
[Black "Bledow, Dr."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C38"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game I., p. 140."]
[PlyCount "32"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 Bg7 5. d4 Qe7 {The proper move is d6.} 6. O-O h6 7. Nc3 c6 8. e5 Qb4 9. Ne4 Bf8 10. Qe2 {This little game is excellently played by White.} g4 11. Nd6+ Bxd6 12. exd6+ Kd8 13. Ne5 Rh7 14. c3 f3 15. Qe4 Nf6 16. Qxh7 Nxh7 $18 {And White gave checkmate in six moves.} 1-0



{PGN 49}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "der Laza, V. H."]
[Black "H."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C38"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game II., p. 141."]
[PlyCount "36"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 Bg7 5. O-O h6 6. d4 d6 7. c3 c6 8. Qb3 {Having now your d pawn protected, and an opening for your Queen, you can advantageously advance the g pawn, and sacrifice your N, as in the Muzio Gambit} Qe7 9. g3 g4 10. Bxf4 gxf3 11. Rxf3 Be6 12. d5 Bg4 13. dxc6 Bxf3 14. cxb7 Qxe4 15. bxa8=Q Qxa8 16. Bxf7+ Kf8 17. Bxg8 Rxg8 18. Bxd6+ Ke8 $18 {White mates in three moves. A brilliant and amusing little skirmish.} 1-0



{PGN 50}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Z."]
[Black "Popert"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C38"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game III., p. 141."]
[PlyCount "49"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 Bg7 5. d4 d6 6. O-O h6 7. g3 g4 8. Nh4 f3 9. Be3 Nc6 10. c3 Bf6 11. Nf5 Bxf5 12. exf5 Nge7 13. Qb3 d5 14. Bd3 Qd7 15. Qc2 h5 16. Nd2 h4 17. Bf4 O-O-O 18. a4 hxg3 19. Bxg3 Rh5 20. b4 Nxf5 21. Bxf5 Qxf5 22. Qb2 Bh4 23. Bxh4 Rxh4 24. a5 Rxh2 25. Kxh2 $19 {Black mates in three moves.} 0-1



{PGN 51}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "der Laza, V. H."]
[Black "J."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C35"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, p. 144."]
[PlyCount "39"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 Be7 4. Bc4 Bh4+ 5. g3 {The correct reply is Kf1.} fxg3 6. O-O gxh2+ 7. Kh1 Bf6 8. Ne5 Bxe5 9. Qh5 Qe7 10. Rxf7 Qc5 11. Rf8+ Ke7 12. d4 Qxd4 {The best move.} 13. Bg5+ Nf6 {Kd6 is the proper play.} 14. Bxf6+ gxf6 15. Qf7+ Kd6 16. Nc3 Rxf8 17. Qxf8+ Kc6 18. Qb4 d5 19. Bb5+ Kb6 20. Na4# 1-0



{PGN 52}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "H----d"]
[Black "der Laza, V. H."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C37"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game I., p. 151."]
[PlyCount "45"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. Ne5 Qh4+ 6. Kf1 Nh6 7. d4 f3 8. g3 Qh3+ 9. Kf2 Qg2+ 10. Ke3 f6 11. Nd3 Nf7 12. Nf4 Bh6 13. Kd3 Bxf4 14. Bxf4 c6 15. Nc3 O-O 16. Bd6 b5 17. Bxf7+ Rxf7 18. h3 b4 19. Bxb4 Ba6+ 20. Ke3 Qxg3 21. Qg1 Qc7 22. Qxg4+ Rg7 23. Qxf3 $18 1-0



{PGN 53}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C37"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game II., p. 151."]
[PlyCount "38"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. Ne5 Qh4+ 6. Kf1 f3 7. Qe1 fxg2+ 8. Kxg2 Qh3+ 9. Kf2 Bg7 10. d4 d6 11. Bxf7+ Ke7 12. Bxg8 Rxg8 13. Nc4 Qf3+ 14. Kg1 Bxd4+ 15. Be3 g3 16. h3 g2 17. Rh2 Bxh3 18. Nbd2 Qf1+ 19. Nxf1 gxf1=Q# 0-1



{PGN 54}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Lewis"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "C37"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game I., p. 158."]
[PlyCount "86"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. O-O gxf3 6. Qxf3 Bh6 7. d4 Qe7 8. Bxf4 Nc6 9. Bxh6 Nxh6 10. Qh5 Qf8 11. Rf6 Qg7 12. Qxh6 Qxh6 13. Rxh6 Nxd4 14. Na3 c6 15. Rd6 Ne6 16. Rad1 Rg8 17. Bxe6 fxe6 18. Nc4 Rg5 19. Kf2 Ke7 20. Ne3 a5 21. Kf3 b5 22. Ng4 Ra7 23. Kf4 Rc5 24. c3 b4 25. cxb4 axb4 26. Ne5 Rc2 27. a4 Rxb2 28. Rxc6 Rf2+ 29. Ke3 Rf8 30. Rdc1 Ba6 31. Rc7 Rxc7 32. Rxc7 Kd6 33. Ra7 Kxe5 34. Rxa6 Rb8 35. Ra5+ d5 36. exd5 exd5 37. Kd3 Rc8 38. Rb5 Rc3+ 39. Kd2 Rc4 40. a5 Rf4 41. a6 Rf2+ 42. Kd3 Ra2 43. Rxb4 Rxa6 1/2-1/2



{PGN 55}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "der Laza, V. H."]
[Black "Szen"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C37"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game II., p. 159."]
[PlyCount "53"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. O-O gxf3 6. Qxf3 Qf6 7. e5 Qxe5 8. d3 Bh6 9. Nc3 Ne7 10. Bd2 O-O {Not considered so strong a move as c6.} 11. Rae1 Qc5+ 12. Kh1 c6 13. Ne4 Qf5 14. Bc3 Bg7 15. Nd6 Qg5 16. Rxe7 {Well played.} Bxc3 {Had he taken Qxe7, White would have won a Piece by at once playing Nf5.} 17. Rxf7 Rxf7 18. Bxf7+ Kg7 19. bxc3 Na6 20. Qxf4 Qxf4 21. Rxf4 Nc7 22. Bb3 Nd5 23. Bxd5 cxd5 24. Rf7+ Kg8 25. Re7 b6 26. Re8+ Kg7 27. Rxc8 1-0



{PGN 56}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C37"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game III., p. 160."]
[PlyCount "51"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. O-O gxf3 6. Qxf3 Qf6 7. e5 Qxe5 8. d3 Bh6 9. Bd2 Ne7 10. Nc3 c6 11. Rae1 Qc5+ 12. Kh1 d5 13. Qh5 Qd6 14. Bxd5 O-O 15. Bb3 Qg6 16. Qc5 Nf5 17. Bxf4 Bxf4 18. Rxf4 Ng7 19. Ne4 Ne6 20. Bxe6 Bxe6 21. Nf6+ Kg7 22. Rxe6 fxe6 23. Nh5+ Kh6 24. Rxf8 Qxh5 25. Rf6+ Kg7 26. Qf8# 1-0



{PGN 57}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "McDonnell"]
[Black "La Bourdonnais"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C37"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game IV., p. 161."]
[PlyCount "37"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. Nc3 gxf3 6. Qxf3 Bh6 7. d4 Nc6 8. O-O Nxd4 9. Bxf7+ Kxf7 10. Qh5+ Kg7 11. Bxf4 Bxf4 12. Rxf4 Nf6 13. Qg5+ Kf7 14. Raf1 Ke8 15. Rxf6 Qe7 16. Nd5 Qc5 17. Kh1 Ne6 18. Rxe6+ dxe6 19. Nf6+ $18 {And wins the Queen.} 1-0



{PGN 58}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C37"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game V., p. 161."]
[PlyCount "46"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. d4 gxf3 6. Qxf3 d5 7. Bxd5 Nf6 8. O-O Nxd5 9. exd5 Qf6 10. Qe4+ Kd8 11. Bxf4 Qe7 12. Qf3 Rg8 13. Nd2 Bg4 14. Qf2 Nd7 15. Rae1 Qf6 16. Ne4 Qg6 17. c4 Bd6 18. Bxd6 cxd6 19. c5 dxc5 20. dxc5 Re8 21. Nd6 Rxe1 22. Qxe1 Kc7 23. Qb4 Kd8 $18 {White must win.} 1-0



{PGN 59}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Staunton"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game VI., p. 162."]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/1NBQKBNR w Kkq - 0 1"]
[PlyCount "45"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. Bxf7+ Kxf7 6. Ng5+ Ke8 7. Qxg4 Nf6 8. Qxf4 d6 9. Nf3 Nc6 10. d4 Qe7 11. O-O Bd7 12. e5 dxe5 13. dxe5 Nd5 14. Qe4 Be6 15. Bg5 Qc5+ 16. Kh1 Ncb4 17. c4 Nb6 18. b3 Be7 19. Nd4 Bg8 20. Bxe7 Qxe7 21. Nf5 Qd7 22. Qh4 Rd8 23. Qf6 $18 {And wins.} 1-0



{PGN 60}

[Event "Manchester Chess Meeting"]
[Site "Manchester, ENG"]
[Date "1857.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Anderssen"]
[Black "Kipping"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game I., p. 165."]
[PlyCount "47"]
[EventDate "1857.??.??"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. h4 g4 5. Ne5 h5 6. Bc4 Rh7 7. Bxf7+ Rxf7 8. Nxf7 Kxf7 9. d4 d6 10. Bxf4 Be7 11. O-O Kg7 12. g3 Be6 13. Qd3 Nd7 14. Nc3 c5 15. Ne2 Bf7 16. Rf2 Bg6 17. Raf1 Ndf6 18. dxc5 Bxe4 19. Qe3 dxc5 20. Be5 Qd5 21. Qg5+ Kh7 22. Nc3 Qc6 23. Bxf6 Bxf6 24. Rxf6 1-0



{PGN 61}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Cochrane"]
[Black "Evans, Captain"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C39"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game II., p. 166."]
[PlyCount "31"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. h4 g4 5. Ne5 h5 6. Bc4 Rh7 7. Nxf7 Rxf7 8. Bxf7+ Kxf7 9. d4 Bh6 {This is the error which loses Black's game. The correct move is f3.} 10. Bxf4 Bxf4 11. O-O Qxh4 12. Rxf4+ Nf6 13. e5 d5 14. Rxf6+ Kg7 15. Qd2 Nd7 16. Qh6+ 1-0



{PGN 62}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "McDonnell"]
[Black "La Bourdonnais"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C33"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game I., p. 177."]
[PlyCount "84"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Bc4 {This was a favorite opening of McDonnell's; he bestowed much time and labor on its analyses, and discovered many skilful methods of diversifying the attack.} Qh4+ 4. Kf1 g5 5. Nc3 Bg7 6. d4 d6 7. Be2 Nc6 8. e5 Nge7 9. Nb5 O-O 10. Nxc7 Rb8 11. Nf3 Qh6 12. exd6 Nf5 13. c3 Ng3+ 14. hxg3 Qxh1+ 15. Kf2 fxg3+ 16. Kxg3 Qxd1 17. Bxd1 h6 18. b3 b5 19. Be3 f5 20. d5 f4+ 21. Kh2 fxe3 22. dxc6 g4 23. Nd4 Be5+ 24. Kg1 Bxd6 25. Ncxb5 Bc5 26. b4 {Bd2 would have been better play we believe.} Bb6 27. Nd6 Bxd4 28. cxd4 Rxb4 29. Nxc8 Rxc8 30. d5 Kf7 31. Bb3 Ke7 32. Kf1 Re4 33. Ke2 Rf8 34. Kd3 Re5 35. Re1 Kd6 {This game is very cleverly played by La Bourdonnais.} 36. Rxe3 Rxe3+ 37. Kxe3 h5 38. Ke4 h4 39. Bd1 h3 40. gxh3 gxh3 41. Bf3 h2 42. Bg2 Rf1 0-1



{PGN 63}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "McDonnell"]
[Black "La Bourdonnais"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C33"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game II., p. 178."]
[PlyCount "60"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Bc4 Qh4+ 4. Kf1 g5 5. Nc3 Bg7 6. d4 Nc6 7. e5 Nge7 8. Nf3 Qh5 9. Ne4 h6 10. Nf6+ Bxf6 11. exf6 d5 12. Bd3 Nf5 13. Qe1+ Kd8 14. Ne5 Nfxd4 {Had Black checked with his Kt. and taken the Rook, he would have been mated in five moves.} 15. c3 Nxe5 16. Qxe5 Nc6 17. Qxd5+ Ke8 18. Bb5 {This portion of the game is played by Mr. McDonnell with great judgment.} Be6 19. Bxc6+ Kf8 20. Qc5+ Kg8 21. Bf3 Qg6 22. Qd4 c5 23. Qe5 Re8 24. Be2 {It would have been better to take Qxc5.} f3 25. Kf2 {It is obvious he would have lost his Q. by taking the P.} fxe2 26. Be3 b6 27. h4 Bd7 28. Qd5 Qxf6+ 29. Kxe2 Bg4+ 30. Kd2 Rd8 0-1



{PGN 64}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Perigal"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C33"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game III., p. 178."]
[PlyCount "38"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Bc4 Qh4+ 4. Kf1 g5 5. Nc3 Bg7 6. g3 fxg3 7. Kg2 Bxc3 {This is not advisable play.} 8. Nf3 Qg4 9. Bxf7+ Kf8 {Taking the Bishop would evidently involve the loss of the Queen.} 10. h3 Qxe4 11. dxc3 Kxf7 12. Re1 Qc6 13. Qd4 Nf6 14. Bxg5 Re8 15. Rxe8 Nxe8 16. Qf4+ Nf6 17. Kxg3 Qd6 18. Ne5+ Kg7 19. Bh6+ Kg8 $18 {White mates in two moves.} 1-0



{PGN 65}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "Staunton, Howard"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C33"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game IV., p. 179"]
[PlyCount "44"]
1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Bc4 d5 4. exd5 {It is better to play Bxd5.} Nf6 5. Qf3 Bd6 6. h3 O-O 7. c3 c6 8. dxc6 Nxc6 9. d4 Ne4 10. Bxf4 Qh4+ 11. g3 Nxg3 12. Bxd6 Nxh1+ 13. Kf1 Be6 14. Bd3 Rad8 15. Bh2 Bd5 16. Qf4 Qh5 17. Nd2 Ne7 18. c4 Ng6 19. Qg4 Qh6 20. Rd1 Qe3 21. Qf5 Bg2+ 22. Kxg2 Nh4+ $19 0-1



{PGN 66}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Desloges"]
[Black "Kieseritzky"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C33"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game V., p. 180."]
[PlyCount "75"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Bc4 b5 4. Bxb5 Qh4+ 5. Kf1 g5 6. Nf3 Qh5 7. Be2 g4 8. Nd4 d6 9. h3 Bg7 10. Nb3 f3 11. gxf3 gxh3 12. f4 Qh4 13. d3 h2 14. Bf3 Nc6 15. d4 Ba6+ 16. Kg2 Nh6 17. Rxh2 Qf6 18. Be3 Rg8 19. Qh1 Nxd4 20. Nxd4 Qxd4 21. Bxd4 Bxd4+ 22. Kh3 Bc8+ 23. Kh4 Bf6+ 24. Kh5 Rg6 25. Rg2 Ng8 26. f5 Rh6+ 27. Kg4 Rxh1 28. c3 Be5 29. Be2 Nf6+ 30. Kf3 Nxe4 31. Rg8+ Ke7 32. Rxc8 Ng5+ 33. Kg4 h5+ 34. Kxg5 f6+ 35. Kg6 Rg1+ 36. Kh7 Rxc8 37. a3 Rcg8 38. Bc4 $19 {And Black mates in three moves.} 0-1



{PGN 67}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Morphy"]
[Black "Bornemann"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C30"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game I., p. 183."]
[PlyCount "61"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 Bc5 3. Nf3 d6 4. c3 Bg4 5. Bc4 Nf6 6. fxe5 Bxf3 7. Qxf3 dxe5 8. d3 Nc6 9. Bg5 a6 10. Nd2 Be7 11. O-O-O Qd7 12. Nf1 O-O-O 13. Ne3 h6 14. Bh4 g5 15. Bg3 Rdf8 16. Nd5 Ne8 17. d4 exd4 18. cxd4 Nd6 19. Bb3 Bd8 20. Rhf1 Nb5 21. Qe3 f5 22. exf5 Rxf5 23. Nb6+ {A manoeuvre altogether unforeseen by M. Bornemann.} cxb6 24. Be6 Rd5 25. Rf7 Ne7 26. Kb1 Re8 27. Rc1+ Nc7 28. Bxd7+ Rxd7 29. d5 {Capitally played. Black can take it only at the expense of a Piece.} Nc6 30. dxc6 Rxe3 31. cxd7+ { And Black gives up the battle, after fighting for above nine hours.} 1-0



{PGN 68}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Montgomery, H. P."]
[Black "McAdam, W. R."]
[Result "1-0"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game II., p. 184."]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/R1BQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"]
[PlyCount "65"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 Bc5 3. Nf3 d6 4. h3 Nc6 5. c3 Nf6 6. Qc2 O-O 7. b4 Bb6 8. b5 Ne7 9. fxe5 dxe5 10. Nxe5 Ng6 11. Nf3 Qe7 12. d3 Nd5 13. Be2 Ne3 14. Bxe3 Bxe3 15. d4 f5 16. e5 f4 17. Bc4+ Kh8 18. h4 Bf5 19. Qe2 Qa3 20. Bb3 Ne7 21. Ng5 Bg6 22. h5 Bf5 23. h6 g6 24. g4 Qa5 25. Qc4 Bxg4 26. d5 Nxd5 27. Rc1 Bxc1 28. Qxd5 Qxc3+ 29. Kf1 Be2+ 30. Kxe2 Qe3+ 31. Kf1 Bd2 32. Qg8+ Rxg8 33. Nf7# 1-0



{PGN 69}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Pillsbury, H. N."]
[Black "Schlechter, Carl"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "D55"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, p. 188."]
[PlyCount "88"]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. Nf3 Nbd7 6. e3 b6 7. Rc1 {Notes by W. Steinitz.--White's game has been modelled chiefly after Steinitz's favorite attack.} ({Preferable is} 7. cxd5 exd5 8. Bb5 Bb7 9. Ne5 $40) 7... Bb7 8. cxd5 exd5 9. Bd3 O-O 10. O-O c5 11. Bb1 {As often shown in my annotations in similar positions, it is absolutely injurious to White's game to allow three well-supportable Pawns against two to be established on the Queen's side. The prospect of a King's side attack on which White speculates is quite unreliable in comparison to the disadvantage on the Queen's side to which he is subjected. At any rate, Pawns ought to be exchanged first, and thus Black's centre weakened.} Ne4 {It was better to make sure of his superiority on the Queen's side by c4 at once.} 12. Bf4 Nxc3 13. Rxc3 c4 14. Ne5 f5 {He had sufficient force on the King's side to ignore any hostile attack in that direction, and systematic operations on the other wing, commencing with b5, were most in order.} 15. Kh1 Nxe5 16. Bxe5 Bd6 17. f4 Bc8 {The combination of this with the next five moves, more especially with the two closely following, is full of high ingenuity, which, however, is wasted on an imaginary danger. For all purposes of defence it was only necessary to advance g6 at the right time, and then to play Rf7, followed by Bf8 eventually. The Queen's wing was still the proper point of attack to which he should have directed his attention more promptly.} 18. Qh5 a6 19. Rf3 Ra7 20. Rh3 g6 21. Qh6 Bxe5 22. fxe5 Rg7 23. Rf3 b5 24. Rc1 Qe7 {For aggressive purposes on the Queen's side, the Queen was better placed at c7.} 25. Rcf1 Rff7 26. h4 Be6 27. g4 {This rash attack and Black's timid reply were only to be accounted for as results of time pressure on both sides.} Qd7 {There was not the slightest danger in capturing the Pawn with a Pawn ahead, while this loses one.} 28. gxf5 gxf5 29. Qh5 Rg6 30. Bxf5 Bxf5 31. Rxf5 Rxf5 32. Rxf5 b4 33. Qf3 c3 34. bxc3 bxc3 35. Rf8+ Kg7 36. Rb8 Qe7 37. Qf4 h5 38. e6 {A fatal miscalculation.} (38. Rc8 {led to a most probable draw, for if} Rg4 39. Qf6+ {etc.}) 38... Rxe6 39. Rc8 Re4 {Black seizes his opportunity with scientific exactitude.} 40. Rc7 Rxf4 41. Rxe7+ Rf7 42. Re5 c2 43. Rg5+ Kh6 44. Rg1 Rb7 0-1



{PGN 70}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Marshall, Frank J."]
[Black "Janowsky, D."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D63"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, p. 190."]
[PlyCount "69"]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Nbd7 5. Nf3 Be7 6. e3 O-O 7. Rc1 { Marshall abandons his favorite variation Qc2.} Re8 {Janowsky also changes c5, played in the earlier games.} 8. Bd3 dxc4 9. Bxc4 a6 {Janowsky's favorite manoeuvre, which might have been expected. Therefore Marshall could have played cxd4 previous to Bd3.} 10. O-O {a4 would have prevented the Bishop being dislodged; but as he manages eventually to prevent Black from keeping the majority of Pawns on the Queen's side, there is nothing to be said against it--except that he only keeps about an even game.} b5 11. Bd3 Bb7 12. Qe2 c5 13. dxc5 { This is compulsory, because of the threat c4, followed by b4.} Nxc5 14. Bc2 {Bb1 might be followed by b4, when Qe1 would take up the place which the R at f1 intends to occupy; but the move would have been better, nevertheless.} Nd5 15. Bxe7 Qxe7 16. Nxd5 Bxd5 17. b3 Rac8 18. e4 Bb7 19. b4 {It is doubtful whether the advance might not have been dispensed with, because of the threat Nd7, Nb6, and Nc4 eventually. But Marshall plays still for attack, not content with a draw in an even position.} Nd7 20. Rfd1 Nf8 21. a3 Rc3 {Black has now the better game.} 22. Bd3 Rec8 23. Rxc3 Rxc3 24. Qb2 Rc8 {Notes By L. Hoffer.--Qc7 could be played here.} 25. Rc1 Rd8 ({An alternative would be} 25... Qf6 26. e5 Qd8 27. Rxc8 Qxc8 28. Qc2 Qxc2 29. Bxc2 Nd7 {winning the King Pawn.}) 26. Bb1 Nd7 {Qd6 or Qc7 could be played. The text move gives White a chance to bring his Queen effectively into play.} 27. Qd4 Nf6 28. Qe5 Ng4 29. Qf4 Nf6 30. h3 Ne8 31. Ne5 Nd6 32. Ng4 Nc4 {Ne8 would have been safer.} 33. e5 Kh8 34. Nf6 gxf6 {Marshall did not expect this complaisance, and Janowsky would not have obliged him had he seen the fatal 35. Qh4. 34...Nxe5 should have been played.} 35. Qh4 {Marshall risked losing the game in trying to win. His boldness was rewarded, but the verdict should be: Don't try it again.} 1-0



{PGN 71}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Lasker, Dr."]
[Black "Tarrasch, Dr."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C12"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game I., p. 199."]
[PlyCount "55"]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Bb4 5. exd5 Qxd5 6. Nf3 {The best line of play against the McCutcheon defence. It was played in a game Sjoberg vs. Giersing, Stockholm, 1906.} c5 {Out of place in this position. Nd7 or Ne4, would be alternatives--the former move in preference.} 7. Bxf6 gxf6 8. Qd2 Bxc3 9. Qxc3 {This excellent move was probably not taken into consideration by Tarrasch when advancing c5.} Nd7 10. Rd1 Rg8 ({If} 10... cxd4 11. Rxd4 {and Black could not challenge the Queen with} Qc5 {because of} 12. Bc4) ({Nor could} 10... Ke7 {be played, because of} 11. dxc5 Qxc5 {would be answered with} 12. Rxd7+ {winning the Queen, and as the continuation in the text is hopeless, there remains the only alternative of 10... O-O with a good enough game, all things considered.}) 11. dxc5 Qxc5 12. Qd2 {Simply posi tion play. Black's forces are paralyzed, and the King fixed on the middle of the centre.} Qb6 {Qc7 at once seems comparatively better, and if necessary Castles, and the case is not altogether hopeless.} 13. c3 a6 14. Qc2 f5 15. g3 Nc5 16. Bg2 Qc7 17. Qe2 b5 18. O-O Bb7 19. c4 b4 20. Qd2 Rb8 21. Qh6 Bxf3 22. Bxf3 Qe5 23. Rfe1 Qxb2 {Not a judicious capture, to say the least.} 24. Qf4 Rc8 25. Qd6 f6 {This move, or resigning. There is nothing else. The latter course would be more to the purpose, unless a miracle is expected.} 26. Bh5+ Rg6 27. Bxg6+ hxg6 28. Rxe6+ 1-0



{PGN 72}

[Event "Blindfold Exhibition"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Morphy"]
[Black "Bierwirth"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C00"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game II., p. 200."]
[PlyCount "67"]

{Played by Mr. Morphy without seeing the Chess-board or men, against M. Bierwirth.} 1. e4 e6 2. d4 c6 3. Bd3 d5 4. exd5 exd5 5. Nf3 Bg4 6. O-O Bd6 7. h3 Bh5 8. Be3 Nd7 9. Re1 Ne7 10. Nbd2 Bxf3 11. Nxf3 h6 12. Qd2 Qc7 13. c4 dxc4 14. Bxc4 f5 15. Ne5 O-O-O 16. Be6 Bxe5 17. dxe5 Kb8 18. Qc3 {A very ingenious move. If Black takes Qxe5, he of course loses her by "Bxa7+, etc." and if with the Kt. it costs him at least a Piece.} Nb6 19. Qa3 Nbc8 20. Rac1 g5 21. f4 gxf4 22. Bxf4 Rd4 23. Qe3 Re4 24. Qf3 Qb6+ 25. Kh2 Rxe1 26. Rxe1 Qb4 27. Re2 Ng6 28. Bd2 Qb5 29. Bxc8 Rxc8 30. Bxh6 Rh8 31. Bg7 Rh7 32. Bf6 Rf7 33. Qh5 Nf4 34. Qxf7 {And Black surrenders, after a struggle of nearly nine hours.} 1-0



{PGN 73}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1854.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Pindar"]
[Black "Montgomery, H. P."]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C10"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game III., p. 201."]
[PlyCount "68"]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 Qxd5 4. Nc3 Bb4 5. Nf3 Nf6 6. Bd3 {A favorite move with several of the strongest of modern players.} c5 {If White take dxc5, the Black {K. B.} is brought into play; and if not, the advance c4 is threatened.} 7. Bd2 Bxc3 8. Bxc3 c4 9. Be2 Ne4 10. O-O Nxc3 {Chiefly to double White's Pawns.} 11. bxc3 Nd7 {Black foresaw the intended attack on c4, and by providing for it in this way brought another Piece into action.} 12. Nd2 Nb6 13. a4 {White keeps up the attack on c4 with a great deal of vigor. The move of a4 was a very good one.} a5 14. Rb1 Qc6 {The best move.} 15. Bf3 Qc7 16. Ne4 Nxa4 17. Qd2 O-O 18. Rb5 {The R. is well posted--for attack and defence.} f5 {Black has now resumed the offensive.} 19. Ng3 Rb8 20. d5 Qd7 {Threatening to take QxQ if dxe6, and attacking Q. R. at the same time. There was still another motive for this move, viz.: to induce White to Rxa5, foreseeing the R. would be lost subsequently.} 21. Rxa5 b5 {To enslave the Rook.} 22. Qf4 {An excellent move. In this and the succeeding moves, White played very well. His efforts were directed to saving his R., but, as the result showed, without success.} Qb7 {Apparently hazardous, but justified by the gain of time.} 23. dxe6 Qb6 24. e7 Re8 25. Re1 Be6 {We believe his best move.} 26. Rxa4 {White was obliged to lose the exchange, although he fought manfully against it.} bxa4 27. Qe5 {Another very good move in White.} Rxe7 28. Nxf5 Rf7 29. Nd6 Rf6 30. Ne4 Rf5 31. Qg3 Rd8 {Black's advantage in the exchange begins now to tell on the game.} 32. Ng5 Bd5 33. Bxd5+ Rdxd5 34. Ne6 Qxe6 {And Black wins.} 0-1



{PGN 74}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1857.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Philadelphia"]
[Black "New York"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B40"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game IV., p. 202"]
[Mode "PM"]
[PlyCount "81"]

1. e4 c5 2. d4 cxd4 3. Nf3 e6 4. Qxd4 Nc6 5. Qd1 Bc5 6. Bd3 Nge7 7. Nc3 d5 8. exd5 Nxd5 9. Ne4 Bb6 10. Bb5 O-O 11. Bxc6 bxc6 12. O-O f5 13. Ng3 Qc7 14. c4 Nf6 15. Qc2 c5 16. b3 Bb7 17. Ng5 Qc6 18. f3 Bc7 19. Re1 Rae8 20. Bb2 g6 21. Re2 e5 22. Rae1 e4 23. fxe4 Bf4 24. Nh3 Bxg3 25. hxg3 Nxe4 26. Ng5 Nxg5 27. Qc3 Qxg2+ 28. Rxg2 Rxe1+ 29. Qxe1 Nf3+ 30. Kf1 Nxe1 31. Rd2 f4 32. gxf4 Ng2 33. Rd7 Rxf4+ 34. Kg1 Be4 35. Rg7+ Kf8 36. Rxh7 Ne3 37. Rh8+ Kf7 38. Be5 Rf1+ 39. Kh2 Nf5 40. Kh3 g5 41. Rc8 {And Philadelphia announces mate in six moves.} 1-0



{PGN 75}

[Event "Blindfold Exhibition"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Morphy"]
[Black "Preti"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B21"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game V., p. 203."]
[PlyCount "47"]

{Played by Mr. Morphy without seeing the Chess-board or men, against M. Preti.} 1. e4 c5 2. d4 cxd4 3. Nf3 e5 4. Bc4 Bb4+ 5. c3 dxc3 6. bxc3 Bc5 7. Nxe5 Qf6 8. Bxf7+ Kf8 9. Nd3 Bb6 10. Bb3 d6 11. Ba3 Nc6 12. O-O Nh6 13. e5 Qg6 14. Nf4 Qg4 15. Ne6+ {This is more effectual than Qxd6 at once.} Bxe6 16. Qxd6+ Kf7 17. Qd7+ Kg6 18. Bxe6 Qg5 19. Bd5 Nxe5 20. Be4+ Nf5 21. Qe6+ Qf6 22. Bxf5+ Kh5 23. g4+ Nxg4 24. Bxg4+ {And Black surrenders.} 1-0



{PGN 76}

[Event "?"]
[Site "Philadelphia, PA., USA"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Clements"]
[Black "Lewis, Dr."]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B40"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game VI., p. 204"]
[PlyCount "125"]

1. e4 c5 2. d4 e6 {The proper move.} 3. Nf3 d5 4. exd5 exd5 5. Bb5+ Nc6 6. O-O Nf6 7. Ne5 Qb6 8. Bxc6+ bxc6 9. Re1 Be6 10. Qe2 {Well played.} cxd4 11. Nxf7 {This move, properly followed up, should have given White the game.} Ne4 12. Nxh8 O-O-O 13. Qf3 Bc5 14. Rxe4 dxe4 15. Qxe4 Re8 16. b4 Bd7 17. Qxe8+ Bxe8 18. bxc5 Qxc5 19. Ba3 Qxc2 20. h3 d3 21. Bb4 Qb2 22. Bc3 Qc1+ 23. Kh2 c5 24. Bd2 Qc2 25. a4 Bc6 {Allowing the escape of the Knight.} 26. Nf7 Qd1 27. Nd6+ Kd7 28. Nc4 Be4 29. Bc3 Qc2 30. Ncd2 Bd5 31. Bxg7 c4 32. Bc3 Qd1 33. Na3 Qh5 34. Nb5 Qg6 35. f3 h5 36. Re1 h4 37. Re5 Bc6 38. Nxa7 Bxa4 39. Nxc4 Bb3 40. Rd5+ Kc7 41. Be5+ Kb7 42. Rd7+ Ka6 43. Rd6+ Qxd6 44. Bxd6 Bxc4 45. Bb4 Kxa7 46. Kg1 Kb6 47. Bd2 Kc5 48. Kf2 Kd5 49. Be1 Ke5 50. Ke3 Kf5 51. Bxh4 d2 {From this poin t, we believe Black can draw the game against White's best possible play. The latter part of the game is well played by Black.} 52. Kxd2 Kf4 53. Ke1 Bd3 54. Kf2 Kf5 55. g3 Bc4 56. g4+ Kg6 57. f4 Bd5 58. f5+ Kg7 59. g5 Be4 60. f6+ Kg6 61. Kg3 Bd5 62. Kg4 Be6+ 63. Kg3 1/2-1/2

{PGN 77}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1858.10.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Thompson, James"]
[Black "Montgomery, H. P."]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B20"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game VII., p. 206."]
[PlyCount "68"]
1. e4 c5 2. c4 e5 3. Nc3 f5 4. exf5 Nf6 5. Nd5 d6 6. Bd3 Nc6 7. g4 Nxd5 8. cxd5 Nd4 9. Nf3 h5 10. gxh5 Nxf5 11. Bb5+ Bd7 12. Bxd7+ Qxd7 13. Ng5 Nd4 14. d3 Qf5 15. Be3 O-O-O 16. Rc1 Be7 17. Bxd4 exd4 18. Ne4 Rde8 19. Rg1 Bg5 20. Qe2 Qf4 21. Rc2 Bf6 22. h3 Kb8 23. b4 Qh2 24. Qg4 Rhf8 25. Kd1 Rxe4 26. dxe4 d3 27. Rd2 Qe5 28. Rxd3 Qa1+ 29. Ke2 Qxa2+ 30. Kf1 cxb4 31. Qe2 b3 32. Rd1 b2 33. Qc2 Bd4 34. Rg2 b1=Q {And wins.} 0-1



{PGN 78}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Morphy"]
[Black "Anderssen"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B01"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game VIII., p. 206."]
[PlyCount "49"]

1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qa5 4. d4 e5 5. dxe5 Qxe5+ 6. Be2 Bb4 7. Nf3 Bxc3+ 8. bxc3 Qxc3+ 9. Bd2 Qc5 10. Rb1 Nc6 11. O-O Nf6 12. Bf4 O-O 13. Bxc7 Nd4 14. Qxd4 Qxc7 15. Bd3 Bg4 16. Ng5 Rfd8 17. Qb4 Bc8 18. Rfe1 a5 19. Qe7 Qxe7 20. Rxe7 Nd5 21. Bxh7+ Kh8 22. Rxf7 Nc3 23. Re1 Nxa2 24. Rf4 Ra6 25. Bd3 1-0



{PGN 79}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Morphy"]
[Black "Anderssen"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B01"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game IX., p. 207."]
[PlyCount "105"]

1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Nf6 3. d4 Nxd5 4. c4 Nf6 5. Nc3 Bf5 6. Nf3 e6 7. Be3 Bb4 8. Qb3 Bxc3+ 9. bxc3 Be4 10. Nd2 Bc6 11. Bd3 Nbd7 12. Qc2 h6 13. O-O O-O 14. Rae1 b6 15. h3 Qc8 16. Kh2 Kh8 17. Rg1 Rg8 18. g4 g5 19. f4 Qf8 20. Rg3 Rd8 21. Nf3 Bxf3 22. Rxf3 Qd6 23. Kg2 Nh5 24. fxg5 hxg5 25. gxh5 g4 26. hxg4 Rxg4+ 27. Kf1 f5 28. Qf2 Ne5 29. dxe5 Qxd3+ 30. Qe2 Qe4 31. Bf2 Qc6 32. Rd1 Rxd1+ 33. Qxd1 Qxc4+ 34. Qd3 Qxa2 35. Rg3 Qc4 36. Qxc4 Rxc4 37. Rg6 Rc6 38. c4 a5 39. Ke2 Rxc4 40. Rxe6 Rc2+ 41. Kf3 a4 42. Rg6 Rc4 43. Rg1 a3 44. e6 a2 45. Ra1 Re4 46. Rxa2 Rxe6 47. Kf4 Rd6 48. Kxf5 Rd5+ 49. Kg4 b5 50. Ra8+ Kh7 51. Ra7 Rd7 52. Bg3 Rg7+ 53. Kh4 1-0



{PGN 80}

[Event "?"]
[Site "Philadelphia, PA. USA"]
[Date "1859.03.10"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Jones, Dr."]
[Black "Montgomery, H. P."]
[Result "0-1"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game X., p. 208."]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "rnbqkbnr/ppppp1pp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"]
[PlyCount "91"]

1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Bd3 Nc6 4. Be3 e5 5. d5 Ne7 6. Ne2 Ng6 7. h3 Nh4 8. O-O Bxh3 9. gxh3 Nf3+ 10. Kg2 Nh4+ 11. Kh1 Qd7 12. Ng1 h6 13. f4 exf4 14. Bxf4 O-O-O 15. Bh2 Be7 16. Nc3 g5 17. Bb5 c6 18. dxc6 bxc6 19. Be2 h5 20. e5 Nh7 21. Bxh5 Kb8 22. Bg4 Qb7 23. Bf3 d5 24. Qe2 Rhf8 25. Qd3 Bc5 26. Nce2 g4 27. Bxg4 Ng5 28. Qb3 Bb6 29. Bg3 Ng6 30. Rf6 Rxf6 31. exf6+ Ka8 32. Qd3 Ne4 33. b3 Ne5 34. Qd1 Nxg4 35. hxg4 Rh8+ 36. Kg2 Qh7 37. Qd3 Qh1+ 38. Kf1 Rf8 39. Be5 Nxf6 40. Bd6 Rf7 41. Qf5 Qh8 42. Kg2 Rg7 43. Be5 Nxg4 44. Bxg7 Ne3+ 45. Kf3 Qh1+ 46. Kf4 $19 {And Black wins.} 0-1



{PGN 81}

[Event "?"]
[Site "Philadelphia, PA. USA"]
[Date "1859.03.12"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Jones, Dr."]
[Black "Montgomery, H. P."]
[Result "0-1"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game XI., p. 209."]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "rnbqkbnr/ppppp1pp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"]
[PlyCount "48"]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 c5 3. d5 Nf6 4. Bg5 Qa5+ 5. Bd2 Qc7 6. Nc3 Be7 7. f4 O-O 8. Nf3 a6 9. a4 c4 10. Be3 Ng4 11. Qd2 Nxe3 12. Qxe3 Bc5 13. Nd4 e5 14. fxe5 Qxe5 15. O-O-O b5 16. Kb1 b4 17. Nce2 d6 18. Ng3 Bg4 19. Rd2 c3 20. bxc3 bxc3 21. Qxc3 Nd7 22. Ka2 Rab8 23. Nge2 Qe8 24. Rd1 Nb6 $19 0-1



{PGN 82}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Harrwitz"]
[Black "Morphy"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A85"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game XII., p. 210."]
[PlyCount "108"]

1. d4 f5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. e3 O-O 6. Bd3 b6 7. Nge2 Bb7 8. O-O Nh5 9. Bxe7 Qxe7 10. Ng3 Nxg3 11. hxg3 d6 12. f4 Nc6 13. g4 Nb4 14. gxf5 exf5 15. Qe2 Rae8 16. Rae1 Qh4 17. Bb1 Re6 18. Qf2 Qh5 19. d5 Rh6 20. Qf3 Qh4 21. a3 {Surely it would have been wiser to play Ne2.} Na6 22. b4 Nb8 23. Ne2 Nd7 24. Ng3 g6 25. Kf2 Nf6 26. Rh1 Ng4+ 27. Kg1 Qf6 28. Rxh6 Nxh6 29. Qd1 Ng4 30. Qd2 Qh4 31. Nf1 Re8 32. g3 Qh3 33. b5 Nf6 34. Qg2 Qxg2+ 35. Kxg2 a6 36. a4 axb5 37. axb5 Ra8 38. Nd2 Ra3 39. e4 fxe4 40. Nxe4 Nxe4 41. Bxe4 Rc3 42. Bf3 Kf7 43. Re4 Bc8 44. Be2 Bf5 45. Rd4 h5 46. Kf2 Kf6 47. Rd2 Bc2 48. Ke1 Be4 49. Kf2 Kf5 50. Ra2 h4 51. gxh4 Kxf4 52. Ra7 Rh3 53. Rxc7 Rh2+ 54. Ke1 Ke3 0-1



{PGN 83}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Harrwitz"]
[Black "Morphy"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D35"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game XIII., p. 211."]
[PlyCount "109"]

1. d4 e6 2. c4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bf4 {A favorite move of Mr. Harrwitz, though decried by the chief authorities.} a6 5. e3 c5 6. Nf3 Nc6 7. a3 cxd4 8. exd4 dxc4 9. Bxc4 b5 10. Bd3 Bb7 11. O-O Be7 12. Be5 O-O 13. Qe2 Nd5 14. Bg3 Kh8 15. Rfe1 Bf6 16. Qe4 g6 17. Nxd5 Qxd5 18. Qxd5 exd5 19. Ne5 Rad8 {Had he taken Nxd4, White would have won at least the exchange by moving Nd7.} 20. Nxc6 Bxc6 21. Rac1 Rc8 22. Bd6 Rg8 23. Be5 Kg7 { Fearing to take the Bishop lest White should obtain an entrance with the Rook.} 24. f4 Bd7 25. Kf2 h6 26. Ke3 {All this is exceedingly well played by White.} Rxc1 27. Rxc1 Rc8 28. Rc5 Bxe5 29. fxe5 Be6 30. a4 {The coup juste. From this point it would not be easy to improve on White's moves.} bxa4 31. Bxa6 Rb8 32. Rb5 Rd8 {Better, perhaps, to have played the Rd8 at once.} 33. Rb6 Ra8 34. Kd2 Bc8 35. Bxc8 Rxc8 36. Rb5 Ra8 37. Rxd5 a3 38. bxa3 Rxa3 39. Rc5 Kf8 40. Ke2 Ke7 41. d5 Kd7 42. Rc6 h5 43. Rf6 Ke7 44. d6+ Ke8 45. e6 fxe6 46. Rxe6+ Kf7 47. d7 Ra8 48. Rd6 Ke7 49. Rxg6 Kxd7 50. Rg5 Rh8 51. Kf3 Ke6 52. Kg3 h4+ 53. Kg4 h3 54. g3 Kf6 55. Rh5 1-0



{PGN 84}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Anderssen"]
[Black "Morphy"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A00"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game XIV., p. 212."]
[PlyCount "84"]

1. a3 e5 2. c4 Nf6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e3 Be6 6. Nf3 Bd6 7. Be2 O-O 8. d4 Nxc3 9. bxc3 e4 10. Nd2 f5 11. f4 g5 12. Bc4 Bxc4 13. Nxc4 gxf4 14. exf4 Qe8 15. O-O Qc6 16. Qb3 Qd5 17. Rb1 b6 18. Qa2 c6 19. Qe2 Nd7 20. Ne3 Qe6 21. c4 Nf6 22. Rb3 Kf7 23. Bb2 Rac8 24. Kh1 Rg8 25. d5 cxd5 26. cxd5 Qd7 27. Nc4 Ke7 28. Bxf6+ Kxf6 29. Qb2+ Kf7 30. Rh3 Rg7 31. Qd4 Kg8 32. Rh6 Bf8 33. d6 Rf7 34. Rh3 Qa4 35. Rc1 Rc5 36. Rg3+ Bg7 37. h3 Kh8 38. Rxg7 Rxg7 39. Rc3 e3 40. Rxe3 Rxc4 41. Qf6 Rc1+ 42. Kh2 Qxf4+ $19 0-1



{PGN 85}

[Event "?"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "????.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Zukertort, J. W."]
[Black "Steinitz, W."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C25"]
[Annotator "The Blue Book of Chess, Game XV., p. 213."]
[PlyCount "39"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. f4 exf4 4. d4 Qh4+ 5. Ke2 d5 {The ingenious attack instituted hereby was invented by Zukertort.} 6. exd5 Bg4+ 7. Nf3 O-O-O 8. dxc6 Bc5 9. cxb7+ Kb8 10. Nb5 (10. dxc5 Nf6 $1 11. Qxd8+ { obtains three pieces for the Q., but loses the game. Qe1, here or on the following move, offers the only defence.}) 10... Nf6 11. Kd3 {Zukertort's analysis, which filled pages and pages of the Neue Berliner Schachzeitung, considered every conceivable move of White's down to a3, but this one, upon which, in conjunction with the following K. move, Steinitz rested his gambit. 11. c3 has been refuted in an elaborate analysis by Mr. Walter Penn Shipley, of Philadelphia.} Qh5 12. Kc3 Bxd4+ (12... a6 13. Kb3 axb5 14. c3 Rxd4 $1 15. cxd4 Qd5+ 16. Kc2 Bf5+ 17. Kd2 Bb4+ 18. Ke2 Ng4 $1 {as played by Messrs. Honegger and Raubitscheck in a consultation game against Steinitz at the Metropolitan Chess Club, 1897. If, instead of Kb3, 13. Nxc7 Black wins by Rxd4!.}) 13. Nbxd4 Qc5+ 14. Kb3 Qb6+ 15. Bb5 Bxf3 16. Qxf3 Rxd4 17. Qc6 Qa5 18. c3 Rd6 19. Qc4 g5 ({Had Black, instead of his last move, pinned the B., the game would have proceeded as follows} 19... Rb6 20. a4 a6 21. Bxf4 Rxb7 22. Kc2 axb5 23. axb5 Qxb5 24. Bxc7+ {and wins.}) 20. Kc2 {White has brought his K. into safety and will remain a piece ahead.} 1-0



End of PGN Supplement

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